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Seven Roads to Hell: A Screaming Eagle at Bastogne Mass Market Paperback – May 9, 2000


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Dell; Reprint edition (May 9, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440236274
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440236276
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.8 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (100 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #241,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Burgett is a veteran of the 101st Airborne and the author of Currahee!, a memoir of the Normandy invasion written shortly after World War II. This is a memoir of Burgetts experiences during the momentous Battle of the Bulge. His narrative flows from one experience to the next with compelling momentum, and his harrowing accounts of battle will leave readers in awe of the courage of soldiers. Burgett provides enough background and description to set the stage for each part of the battle that swirled around him, and numerous maps and photographs detail the action. Burgetts story is not one that he lived through some distance from the lineshis division was right in the thick of battle. He provides a complete picture of the brutality of war and an excellent account of one of the wars most pivotal battles. Recommended for both public and academic libraries.Mark E. Ellis, Albany State Univ., GA
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

Burgett follows Currahee!, his memoir of the Normandy invasion with the 101st Airborne Division--the "Screaming Eagles" --with the story of the legendary stand at Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge. There, surrounded and outnumbered, the 101st and a few other units held the vital junction of seven roads. Burgett's account is unsparingly realistic about the lot of even the elite infantryman. Only partially recovered from its campaign in the Low Countries, the 101st was rushed into combat. For much of the Battle of Bastogne, it was short of ammunition and medical supplies, without air cover, with little or no winter clothing, and with only a motley array of weapons, some of them captured from the Germans or borrowed from other American units. Burgett is eloquent about the hardships and hazards that he survived, while many good friends did not, as well as about some of the 101st's supporters, including an African American howitzer battalion that fought to the limits of its ammunition supply. A sterling addition on the infantryman's World War II. Roland Green --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

God bless the American soldier!
Hawkeye
It is very well written, easy to read, accurate to the finest detail without ever losing the story.
Toe Tag
This book should be read by all who are interested in the history of WWII.
William E. Stauffer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Henry E. Shelnutt on December 31, 1999
Format: Hardcover
As a former paratrooper, and having several uncles and older cousins who served in airborne units in World War II, I can only say that Mr. Burgett captures the essentials of airborne combat in WWII. One of my uncles had great difficulty reading this book. "It brought back too many memories". Mr. Burgett's earlier book, "Currahee", brought the reader to England prior to the NOrmandy invasion, and then to Normandy with all the confusion, savage combat and gallows humor found in line outfits. This volume continues in that line, and complements greatly works like "A Time For Trumpets" and Toland's "Battle". The book offers no political insights, second guessing of commanders. It offers the insight and observations of a young American GI fighting far away from home, watching friends die, and wondering who was next. A fine job!
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Paul H. on December 19, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Mr. Burgett was a 19 year old paratrooper in the 101st airborne who had the luck (good or bad) to witness some of the fiercest fighting that took place during the second world war. This book provides you with the feel from the trenches of those terrible dark days when it looked like the Wehrmacht and Hitler's Germany were striking forward again. The terrible cold, fear, and the brutality of the combat spring to life in this well written account. This text is an easy and quick read, I finished it on one 3 hour plane flight.
Mr. Burgett participated in multiple attacks and defenses and his writing of them is extremely detailed as I suppose those memories linger quite clearly. This is not a book of strategy or an overview of the Battle of Bastogne, but simply how one man experienced the combat and the losses. No quarter was given or asked for. Prisoners were given no solace as there was no food, medicine or even men to guard them. This was combat in its rawest form. A good reminder to all of what war really is in its basic form - young men killing other young men. Mr. Burgett experienced this at arms length and is kind enough to share his experiences. Read this and be thankful for the freedom from fascism that we share!
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Greg Castro on September 5, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the finest account of paratroopers in the Bulge that I have ever read, barring none, including Ambrose. That is not to say that Burgett is a better writer - Burgett does a fine job for a former free-lance roofer - but Don's story in Seven Roads to Hell is so utterly captivating, so riveting that I found myself unable to stop reading and read the entire book in a single night.

Burgett will help you feel the overwhelming futility of brave men, who after the Battle of Noville, after their unspeakable losses, being told just two days later that they must go into action again. Burgett will stab you with the lonely bitternes of exhausted men, scrambling for a hot meal over a small cooking fire, being ordered out to clear the Bois Jaques Woods of a battalion of Germans and then returning the same day, with more losses of heroic men - the dead men's un-claimed mess kits by the cold fire.

Surely these are some of the most touching images ever laid to paper.

I should add, that if you have never read an account of the battle of Noville and Bois Jaques Woods, you must buy this book. Buy it for this reason alone, and love it for so many others.

The personal heroism of the American paratrooper looms into full focus in these pages, framing the phrase, "The greatest generation" like nothing else can.

The sacrifice of these great Americans is more carefully and painfully detailed here than in any other book I have read.
We all indebted to Don Burgett. And not just for his fine book.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Chad R. Reihm on December 30, 2000
Format: Hardcover
If you are looking for a personal account of the siege of Bastogne during the battle of the bulge and the tremendous feat of the 101 Screaming Eagles or are just looking for a great non fiction thriller then get this book. Burgett was a member of the 506th and fought in some of the most bloody battles around Bastogne. But besides the awesome fighting sequences he describes the misery of the foxhole, freezing temps and patrols. But look for the cheap 5 dollar version of the books because it is the same thing including the pics. And if you like this then go back to the start and read Burgetts Curahee...an awesome account of his part in the airdrops during Normandy, also available in the cheap version...
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 24, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Burgett's heart-stopping account of his role in the Battle of the Bulge is very skillfully written in his latest book Seven Roads to Hell. This book by far surpasses any other war book I have come across. The story is told to the T, with all the stops pulled. If you are looking for the real and unbridled version of World War II, then this book is a must-have. I recommend this book to the best of my ability. Terrific job Burgett!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 8, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Having read Burgett's book in one 3 hour sitting, I can't say enough about it. I can't help but feel a need to meet him personally to thank him for the courage to endure the most extreme of circumstances. The book is a fast read and one is able to get a great sense of the horror, fear, desperation and drudgery of war. How men withstood the conditions is beyond me. The courage of these men is felt throughout the book and their ability to answer the call of duty in a hostile foreign land is without comparison. To think Burgett was a mere 19 at the time is amazing, yet the honor with which these men faced such tribulation is not known by anyone in our present society. His descriptions of the grind and wait between fierce attacks was compelling. Also his unabashed hatred for the enemy was brought vividly to the forefront of the book. One can't help but feel, why did some survive and others perish. Burgett details the enormous amount of skill and luck that enabled one to become an "old man" in the platoon. His gruesome descriptions of the horror and reality of war were riveting. Yet just as compelling was his matter of fact attitude that there was a duty to be done. I couldn't put this book down.
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