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Seven Types of Ambiguity Paperback – January 17, 1966

ISBN-13: 978-0811200370 ISBN-10: 081120037X

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: New Directions (January 17, 1966)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 081120037X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811200370
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 0.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #159,300 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

This book really goes through the English language and the creative uses of ambiguity.
Jt Wright
It is heartily recommended to anyone with an interest in poetry, and is absolutlely essential for anyone working for a college or graduate English degree.
Ulysses
He draws the examples on which he exercizes his probative skill mostly from great writers in the English language.
HackedHacked

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

152 of 162 people found the following review helpful By HackedHacked on February 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
The prose of the author is delightful: it was originally published in 1930 when better authors had a genteel but sophisticated style. The author's original intention was to set forth a theory of metaphor by distinguishing and analyzing, as the title says, seven forms of (linguistic) ambiguity. He draws the examples on which he exercizes his probative skill mostly from great writers in the English language. But for those schooled after, say, the 1950s it is a wonderful exhortation to read, speak and write with more subtelty than is usually encountered. A corollary of the case he makes is that ambiguity--carefully crafted ambiguity, not ambiguity of the slothful kind--can be very powerful, but it presupposes a precision in reading and writing which is a precondition for well-crafted metaphor. As such it stands for OUR generations as an exhortation to lingusitic sophistication and an implicit disproof that "liberty" goes hand in hand with slovenliness. It certainly does make better readers out of those who go through his book.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Blockhed Blockhed on November 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is one of the finest introductions to the power of words ever written. I read it when I was the same age as the author, and it etched itself on my mind. I cannot think of a more convincing analysis of how poetry works, beyond the simplicities of rhyme and rhythm. Poetry compresses emotion. It makes the words work hard. That is why it is effective and memorable. A line of poetry contains multiple meanings, which is what I understand by Empson's "ambiguity". Prose attempts to eliminate ambiguity, and the result is legalese, or the writings of the denser philosophers: hopelessly boring, unmemorable, ultimately incomprehensible. This book is a guide. I have kept it with me for the last fifty years.
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Robert E. Koskulics on March 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is for people who love words. Not just love them, but have a serious lust for them, who have such a powerful desire to absorb as much as possible that you can't even fully articulate why. What this novel does is help us remember why we love poetry, and the enormous power it can have. That's not to say it can make you like poetry if you don't already have a healthy understanding of it; indeed, in order to read this book I need complete silence and total concentration. This is not a book to read before you go to bed, or while you're at the gym. This is a book to read on your day off, when you can shut off all outside distraction. That seems like a lot to ask, but the rewards are great. After reading this, take another look at your all time favorite works of literary art. Take a look at "Macbeth," or, "The Sun Also Rises," or even, "Fight Club." This book will help you get more depth of meaning than you ever suspected out of these words.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Ulysses on February 18, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is one of the great milestones of twentieth century literary criticism. Published originally in 1930, its relevance has not faded. It is heartily recommended to anyone with an interest in poetry, and is absolutlely essential for anyone working for a college or graduate English degree. It could also be profitably used by younger persons in high school honors English programs.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jt Wright on October 29, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I thought that William Empson is one of the best writers of his time and now. I have not read book like this one. This book really goes through the English language and the creative uses of ambiguity. Anyone and everyone should read this book.
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Format: Paperback
The art of close reading as a technique to glean meaning from a text involves the use of a myriad of critical reading skills that we like to think are taught in both secondary and higher education. I might have begun the next sentence with, "Alas..." but instead it might be useful to point out that the deficiencies of readers in comprehending texts is not limited to today. In the years following the end of the Great War, students then as now were increasingly slothful in their reading skills. Part of the problem was that the term "ambiguity" had received some bad press. Most readers assume that when they read a text that if they encounter a word, phrase, term, or idea that they deem ambiguous it must be the result of sloppy writing on the author's part. William Empson in Seven Types of Ambiguity rises to the defense of ambiguity by insisting that the rush to indict it as slothful thinking might just be premature. What, Empson asks, should a reader think if an ambiguous word or idea is deliberately so? Does the mere fact that this word or idea might have more than one meaning suggest that the author does not supply any helpful hints? Empson writes of ambiguity as if it were yet another close reading technique that when judiciously used induces the reader to peek under the patina of that ambiguity to uncover a richness of meaning that might otherwise lie dormant. Other New Critical writers prior to Empson have urged readers to be aware of the presence of ambiguities but mostly in the context of adversely judging the presence of an "organic unity" that might be forestalled by their presence. Ambiguities thus have a definite upside.Read more ›
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