Seventy-Seven Clocks: A Peculiar Crimes Unit Mystery and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Seventy-Seven Clocks: A Bryant & May Mystery (Bryant & May Mysteries) Mass Market Paperback – November 29, 2005


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$0.98
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.99 $0.01
Audio CD
"Please retry"
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Blockbuster Mysteries
Check out December's new blockbuster mysteries, featuring titles by James Patterson, David Baldacci, and Preston & Child. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Bryant & May Mysteries
  • Mass Market Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam (November 29, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553587153
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553587159
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,287,750 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Set in 1973, Fowler's bloody and compelling third mystery to feature eccentric London detectives Arthur Bryant and John May details how the pair first joined Scotland Yard's Peculiar Crimes Unit. The murders Bryant and May investigate more than fit the unit's mission to handle cases outside the norm—an elderly lawyer is found poisoned in a hotel lobby, apparently from a snake bite, while other victims are killed by toxic makeup and a starved tiger. The odd sleuthing couple find that these terrifying crimes are all connected with the strange Whitstable family, whose Victorian patriarch founded a bizarre group called the Alliance of Eternal Light. Fans of the previous books in the series, Full Dark House and The Water Room, will appreciate the portrait of a younger Bryant and May, but even they are likely to feel let down by the far-fetched solution. Still, that won't erase the pleasure of a twisty thriller, full of action and plot surprises.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Highly unusual ... exciting and original.... It starts with a violent death in the lobby of the legendary Savoy Hotel and quickly expands to include art vandalism, Gilbert and Sullivan, and a host of other peculiarities."—Chicago Tribune

"A twisty thriller, full of action and plot surprises."—Publishers Weekly

More About the Author

Christopher Fowler was born in Greenwich, London. He is the multi award-winning author of thirty novels and twelve short story collections, and the author of the Bryant & May mystery novels. His first bestseller was 'Roofworld'. Subsequent novels include 'Spanky', 'Disturbia', 'Psychoville' and 'Calabash'. His books have been optioned by Guillermo Del Toro ('Spanky') and Jude Law ('Psychoville'). He spent many years working in film. His memoir of growing up without books, entitled 'Paperboy', was highly acclaimed, and was followed by a sequel in April 2013, 'Film Freak'. After this came his dark comedy-thriller 'Plastic' in July 2013.

He has written comedy and drama for BBC radio, including Radio One's first broadcast drama in 2005. He writes for the Financial Times and the Independent on Sunday, Black Static magazine and many others. His graphic novel for DC Comics was the critically acclaimed 'Menz Insana'. His short story 'The Master Builder' became a feature film entitled 'Through The Eyes Of A Killer', starring Tippi Hedren and Marg Helgenberger. In the past year he has been nominated for 8 national book awards. He is the winner of the Edge Hill prize 2008 for 'Old Devil Moon', and the Last Laugh prize 2009 for 'The Victoria Vanishes'.

He wrote the 'War Of The Worlds' videogame for Paramount with Sir Patrick Stewart. He is currently rehearsing his play 'Falling Stars' in preparation for a London debut.

Christopher has achieved several pathetic schoolboy fantasies, releasing a terrible Christmas pop single, becoming a male model, writing a stage show, posing as the villain in a Batman graphic novel, running a night club, appearing in the Pan Books of Horror, and standing in for James Bond.

His short stories have appeared in Best British Mysteries, The Time Out Book Of London Short Stories, Dark Terrors, London Noir, Inferno, Neon Lit, Cinema Macabre, the Mammoth Book of Horror and many others. After living in the USA and France he is now married and lives in King's Cross, London and Barcelona, Spain.

Customer Reviews

A gripping mystery, well drawn characters, and an impressive sense of environment.
Matthew Dow Smith
Having just recently discovered the Bryant and May series, I have been determined to read the books in order.
Pax Deo
The problem with the book is the plot- it is just a little bit too far-fetched, even for the PCU.
olshaggy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By L. J. Roberts TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 8, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I absolutely loved the first two books of this series. The writing was such that I'd read passages aloud to others. This didn't have that same cache'. There didn't seem to be as much interaction between the two protagonists until well into the book. Fowler loves introducing twists to the plot which is fun, but the solution to the mystery really strains credibility. There is a secondary protagonist in Sam Gates, a receptionist at the Savoy, but the outcome of her fear of the dark really bothered me. I enjoyed the story, but didn't feel it was nearly as good as the first two books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By DayLily on February 2, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I love these old school detectives- no fingerprints, no fiber evidence here, just two cops bouncing ideas off of each other as they interview witnesses and suspects. Each book is set in London, and the city's rich history and geography play a part in each book.

However, this book is not the strongest in the series. There are a couple of coincidences that don't work for me, and the plot is just so complicated that it strains belief.

Read them in order, starting with Full Dark House. By the time you get to Seventy Seven Clocks, you'll forgive the author of any mistakes he has made.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By OolooKitty on June 15, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It would have been nice if somewhere, anywhere, in this book -- the copyright date, the title page, a note to the reader, anything -- it might have been mentioned that this is little more than a reworking of an early Bryant/May mystery, "Darkest Day". I always enjoy Fowler's books, but not so much that I need to buy them twice over.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tigger VINE VOICE on June 3, 2011
Format: Paperback
I'm growing very fond of this series, despite - or maybe due to - its extremely improbable storylines. That's to be expected from Scotland Yard's PCU (Peculiar Crimes Unit), though, and the very implausibility is what gives it its charm. This episode is set in 1973, which was neat - modern era, but before cell phones and PC's. Starts off with a lively, two-prong bang: the bizarre poisoning death of an elderly man in the lobby of the famous Savoy Hotel, and an Edwardian-garbed maniac storming into the National Gallery of London to deface a Waterhouse painting. More curious and rather gruesome deaths occur, along with much dry wit (but not overdone; kudos to Fowler for perfect pitch). All is connected with one strange wealthy family, a secret society, and the ever-fascinating, labyrinthine history of London, which seems to be Fowler's niche. I love the two crotchety old English detectives, Arthur Bryant and John May, and as with The Water Room, additional character POV's are equally satisfying (the young, privileged Geraldine `Jerry' Gates in this case).

I'm rarely one to stick with any series for too long, or at least not consistently, but so far I'm game for a few more on this one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Blue in Washington TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 22, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
"Seventy-Seven Clocks" has its fine moments as all of the Bryant and May mysteries do. Set in 1973 London, this is the story of the serial murders of members of a large, wealthy British mercantile family who are singularly unlikable, unproductive and disagreeable down the last young child. And here is one of the problems with this book, the reader cannot care a whit about the victims, let alone the killer(s).

In any event, author Christopher Fowler, has crafted an intricate plot that has its roots in the Victorian hay days of the British Empire and offers little clue before the last 100 pages (of nearly 500) as to how the tale will sort out. The route to the final solution is littered with many, many bodies, killed off in some pretty ingenious ways. Along the way, Fowler has much to say (through his two detective protagonists) about the rottenness of the British class system--particularly the upper middle class--which he effectively portrays as
destroying the country.

I did enjoy most of this book, mainly because Fowler has such a large bag of tricks that he has dragged out here. But I agree with another reviewer, who advised that this was not the best Bryant & May Mystery to start with. The series is grand and has several other gems that shine brighter.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Sozaeva VINE VOICE on February 27, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Although the book is a recent release (relatively), the plot takes place in 1973, which Fowler uses to good effect in creating atmosphere. Bryant & May, the main characters, are old-school English detectives in charge of the Peculiar Crimes Unit - in other words, crimes that are odd or unusual. I enjoyed the book and enjoyed following them as they trailed their criminal and tried to figure out how and why the murders were occurring. A great find for people fond of old-school mysteries and good atmospheric reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Melissa McCauley VINE VOICE on May 16, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Arthur Bryant and John May are the odd and perfectly mismatched detectives of London's peculiar crimes unit. A lawyer dies of a snake bite in the Savoy lobby, an eccentric aristocrat blows up on the tube, a starved tiger eats a family in their own home. Methodical May and Unconventional Bryant must track down a mystery rooted in Victorian superstition and class distinctions that are causing bizarre deaths in the present. Impossible to put down, a thinking person's mystery, full of deeply satisfying history and folklore, not just mutilated bodies like most mysteries nowadays.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Slick on December 23, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like the Peculiar Crimes Unit mysteries, however, this one is rather weak compared to the others. The same old lovable characters are here but, the plot is outside the realm of the feasible. No matter, I enjoyed the story because of the characters and plot suspense; as a mystery, the ending is meh.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?