SEXUAL ECOLOGY: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sexual Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men Paperback – May 1, 1998


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$34.95 $3.99
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (May 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452277191
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452277199
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,656,666 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

There was a time, before AIDS, when gay male culture was often synonymous with multiple partners, bathhouses, and an emphasis on youth and physical beauty. Monogamy was identified with "straight" culture and therefore something to be resisted. Even when the AIDS epidemic was at its height, the gay community promoted condom use but did little to discourage risky behavior. In his groundbreaking book Sexual Ecology, author Gabriel Rotello views the epidemic in a new way: as part of an ecological system. Rotello's approach, while unique in the study of AIDS, is one familiar to the environmental movement. He sees the disease not as a discrete element, but as part of a system of "behaviors, thoughts and feelings that made gay culture so susceptible to AIDS."

Although Rotello aims his book primarily at a gay audience, Sexual Ecology has a wider appeal. His chronicle follows the growth of promiscuity among homosexual men through its promotion by bathhouse owners and the gay media. Equally fascinating is the current trend toward more mainstream values among many gay men. Finally, his suggestions for making gay culture sustainable (in the words of environmental science) instead of self-destructive provide serious food for thought and for debate. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

If gay men want to end the AIDS epidemic, they must renounce promiscuity. That is the crux of Rotello's careful exposition on why AIDS struck in the '80s, why a second wave of it hit in the '90s, and why, despite condoms, AIDS will regularly recur if promiscuity isn't curbed. The mainspring of the epidemic, Rotello insists, is the high number of other men (more than 1,000 a year) with whom each fast-lane gay man has sex. Rotello demonstrates that by closing the avenue of infection such promiscuity creates, disease prevalence must decline. Culturally, he says, closing those avenues demands reducing the allure of the acts that transmit HIV most readily and promoting sexually faithful monogamy. Rotello's restatement of an argument that is not entirely new is extremely important because of its thoroughness and because he is a gay radical who here parts company with the gay-lib party line that promiscuity is essential to gay male identity. Young gay men especially should heed him. Ray Olson --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Gabriel Rotello is an American writer, producer and director. He was born and raised in Danbury, CT, attended Knox College in Galesburg, IL, Carlton College in Northfield MN, and was an exchange student at Tribhuvan University in Kathmandu, Nepal.

After graduating from college in 1974 he moved to New York City where he became a keyboard player, musical director and producer, working with many prominent rock and R&B artists.

In 1989 at the height of the AIDS epidemic, Rotello founded OutWeek Magazine in New York and became its editor-in-chief. OutWeek quickly became a focus of gay and AIDS activism, sparking many controversies and breaking important national stories. During his tenure at OutWeek, Rotello hired many young lesbian and gay writers who went on to become well-known authors and editors, including Sarah Pettit, Jim Provenzano, Michelangelo Signorile, Victoria Starr, David Kirby, Dale Peck, James St James and Karl Soehnlein.

In 1992 Rotello became the first openly gay op-ed columnist for a major American newspaper, New York Newsday, for which he received the GLADD Award in 1995 as Outstanding Journalist. He was also a long-time columnist for The Advocate and has contributed to many publications including The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Village Voice, The Nation, The New Scientist, and the Huffington Post.

In 1997 Dutton published Rotello's seminal study of AIDS epidemiology and prevention, "Sexual Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men." He also co-authored Mel Cheren's memoir of the disco era, "My Life and the Paradise Garage: Keep On Dancin'".

Since 1999 Rotello has written, produced and/or directed dozens of documentaries and television programs, often working with the award-winning World of Wonder Productions (The Eyes of Tammy Faye) and more recently Flight 33 Productions (Life After People). His work has appears on networks such as HBO, Showtime, The History Channel, The Learning Channel, Cinemax, AMC, Bravo, Oxygen, VH1 and Comedy Central.

His website is www.gabrielrotello.com

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 2, 1997
Format: Hardcover
The truth hurts and thank god someone finally told it about AIDS. As a gay man who is tired of hearing other gay people claim that religion, educators, the government and homophobia is responsible for transmission of HIV it is refreshing to find a well-reasoned voice showing that gay culture also contributed to the disaster that AIDS is. Mr. Rotello will most likely be crucified by gay theorists but his message is undeniable; unless gay culture finds a sustainable ecology it will continue exactly where it has been for the past 10 years----mired in a disaster
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 25, 1998
Format: Paperback
Every gay man must read this book, or be made aware of its content. Even one more death is way too many. What needs taming is not "normal promiscuity" -- say 10 to 50 partners a year. (!) The problem is "hyperpromiscuity" -- gay men who are having a thousand partners a year, and a dozen in one night. This created the biological climate which enabled the spread of AIDS; without it, there would have been no epidemic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 11, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Gabriel Rotello has done a such a great service to the gay community by writing this powerful book. It is provocative and controversial only because the truth hurts sometimes. We've gone for so long not wanting to face reality in the gay world, not wanting to face the difficult challenges, not wanting to do the things that we must do if we are to alter the course of the epidemic. Rotello isn't afraid to face these things, nor is he afraid of the attacks that come when someone does raise the thorny but important issues. I thank him enormously for this book and urge every gay man to read it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Randolfe H. Wicker on November 21, 2004
Format: Paperback
I am amazed that I missed this book until a couple months ago. Indeed, it amazes me how few people have been motivated to write a review of it.

Rotello really explains in a simple sensible understandable fashion how the AIDS epidemic resulted from changes in technology , sexual role changes among gay males , social patterns of IV drug users (those in NYC shared needles in galleries while on the West Coast most used their own works at home and escaped the epidemic) and finally how hyperpromiscuity in large cities were the core centers for spreading this epidemic.

Most importantly, Rotello sees a continuing disaster in the gay community if old patterns of multi-partner 1970s promiscuity are reverted to by today's generation.

This is a must read book for anyone touched by this disease. It should get 50 stars.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again