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Sexual Suicide Paperback – January 1, 1975


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Bantam Books (1975)
  • ASIN: B000KO0D9E
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,040,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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49 of 53 people found the following review helpful By John Yuskaitis on June 1, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The Sexual Revolution is now complete - anything and everything is looked upon as normal and there are very few inhibitions, if any at all. Thirty-three years ago Gilder tried to show us why we were embarking on a suicidal mission, but we didn't receive his message very well, did we?

His most essential premise is that men and women are different, not only sexually and physically, but emotionally and even intellectually. The second important point he makes is that women are not inferior to men, and in fact are superior in sexual matters for the simple reason that they are constructed physically and emotionally to handle the new lives that result from sexual unions, whereas men lack the rudimentary necessities for doing so. This idea contrasts sharply with the feminist assertions that men consider women inferior and treat them that way. Gilder doesn't have anything very favorable to say about the feminist movement, which he feels is, in large part, responsible for the present-day attitudes about sexual relationships between men and women.

The author is an advocate of strong families, which has ALWAYS been the cornerstone of a strong society, and he reasons that the breakdown of heretofore normal sexual relationships is leading to the breakdown of families. Sure enough, 33 years later we can see just how badly the family structure is breaking down, and it is not hard to imagine the almost total demise of the family.

Gilder makes so many good points in his analysis that it is hard to zero in on which are the most important, but one such point that needs and deserves comment is the one on gender roles.
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45 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Cat Lady 67 on May 19, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I bought and read "Sexual Suicide" when it was out in the 1970's. It was an eye-opener, reminescent of Alexis de Tocqueville's "Democracy in America" [...]. Since he has written a new book (1992) called "Men and Marriage," (which I confess I have not yet read,) that might be a more up-to-date statement of the consequences of the sexual revolution than is his 1973 writing.

The value of the 1973 writing is still great, partly because it demonstrates that before the sexual revolution had "won" our society, a thoughtful sociologist could predict accurately what would be the consequences of women giving men the opportunity to sexually use them outside of marriage:

1. One MAJOR reason males married was to have a sex life. Post-Sexual Revolution, marriage becomes unnecessary to have sex,

2. so women find it difficult to find men to marry. They become increasingly willing to settle for a live-in boyfriend or a series of one-night stands.

3. The live-in boyfriend is far more likely to sexually or physically abuse his girlfriend's children than would be their own father. (The emotional and physical consequences of this abuse are immense.)

3. Children born to single mothers must either be given up in adoption (which is now rarely done), or the mother must try to go it alone financially. Especially if the mother is not through school, she will have great difficulty getting enough education to make an adequate income. She and her children often live in poverty.

4. Poverty often means attending sub-adequate school systems, and see undesirable examples of choices in the neighborhood around them.

5.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By john thames on February 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Gilder once wrote a book proving a very simple point - men should have all the jobs to equalize all the babies for women. Instead, we have foolishly given women all the jobs in addition to all the babies. Gilder correctly predicted all that has come to pass - which is why his analysis is indisputably correct. Of course, he could have mentioned that feminist movements have proved equally disastrous in the past - ancient Sparta and Rome, for instance. But that is a minor criticism of an otherwise excellent - and very prophetic - book.
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8 of 23 people found the following review helpful By C. Iverson on August 31, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This was a very interesting read for me as I am fascinated endlessly by the exploration of gender roles and its many iterations and changes.

Many observations made here do seem acute, such as the fact that young men without proper male role models and guidance from them will have greater difficulty adjusting to civil society, seeking instead the companionship of other lost boys who perpetuate an immature attitude towards women, marriage, and adult responsibility. I believe this is a very germane topic to today's young men.

However, I found some of the conclusions to be had in this book to be somewhat laughable. For instance, it seems to imply that allowing women to "infiltrate" the workplace (the MAN'S domain) will naturally make men feel threatened. The implication made is not that men should endeavor to see past biological gender and view women as equals in the workplace, but that women should stick with teaching or secretarial work... or better yet, get barefoot and back in the kitchen, leaving men their respite in the workplace as a Boys-Only Club.

Nevermind the conclusion one could reach after reading about the natural way of men as providers and women as receivers. If women were to return to the "natural" way, they would always be subject to the men they marry. Yes, some husbands would do a fabulous job with this - but not all. I refuse to accept that this "natural" way is best when it practically FORCES one individual to rely on another for survival.
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