Buy Used
$3.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Appearance of only slight previous use. Cover and binding show a little wear. All pages are undamaged with potentially only a few, small markings. Help save a tree. Buy all your used books from Green Earth Books. Read. Recycle and Reuse.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Shadow Culture: Psychology and Spirituality in America Paperback – May 2, 2000


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.96 $3.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Counterpoint (May 2, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1582430802
  • ISBN-13: 978-1582430805
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,797,844 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Although critics would have New Age spirituality deemed trendy and fleeting, author and religious scholar Eugene Taylor offers a convincing testament to the historical worthiness and longevity of the alternative spirituality movement. Taylor, who is a lecturer in psychology at Harvard Medical School, explains that the New Age movement is a historically rooted movement that blends psychology and spirit. In fact, he calls it the "Third Great Awakening" in American religious life--an awakening that always springs from a "shadow culture" (most recently, the counterculture rebellion of the '60s). What makes this a fascinating read is its extensive and smoothly presented research. Taylor documents the "First Great Awakening," which dates back to the puritans and mystics of the 1600s and 1700s. Stretching forward in time, he presents the "Second Great Awakening," with profiles of leaders such as Emerson and Thoreau. This fascinating discussion elevates the New Age movement to an evolutionary necessity, which will no doubt raise the ire or gratitude of American readers. --Gail Hudson --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Although both of these books focus on the great interest in spirituality in America today, much of which lies outside the predominant religious cultures, they are quite different. Shorto (Gospel Truth: The New Image of Jesus Emerging from Science and History and Why It Matters) considers contemporary psychiatric cases to show how many psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychotherapists have opened themselves to spiritual and religious dimensions. Freud may have dismissed religion, but now the most recent edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual includes an entry for the "religious or spiritual problem." Taylor (William James on Consciousness Beyond the Margin) presents the history, starting in the 1700s, of various spiritual and religious movements that he calls the "shadow culture"Athey lie in the shadow of prevailing cultures and religions. He discusses Quakers and Shakers, Swedenborgians, Christian Scientists, and many more, and brings us to the current American focus on a seeming connection between psychology and spirituality. Both books are extremely interesting and both tackle challenging and controversial subjects. Both also call for some background on the part of the reader. Highly recommended.AJohn Moryl, Yeshiva Univ. Libs., New York
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 2, 1999
Format: Hardcover
"Boring"--the pet phrase of the adolescent who's "little gray cells" have been overstretched by too much stimulation--is far from a correct portrayal of this fine book. It is a deeply intelligent, constantly fascinating, and highly readable account of the entire sweep of American spirituality, folk psychology, and the American visionary tradition from their beginnings in colonial days. From the visionaries and mystics of early 1700s, to the Quakers and Shakers, to Swedenborg, Blavatsky, and the New England Transcendentalists, and on to the Americanization of Jung and Freud, and finally to the modern transpersonal psychologies and spiritually inspired alternative therapies, this is a record of the passions and history of American spiritual life never before recorded with such clarity. Don't be fooled by trash reviews written by rash undergraduates (of all ages). This is a story without precedent, a landmark in American spiritual and intellectual history written by one of the foremost historians of our age.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The author's comments on the vitriol from the first reviewer of this book reinforce my earlier suspicions about that person's "shadow" agenda. The above "review" is a clear abuse of the privilege offered by Amazon in that it does not refer to the book's content but serves only as a personal whetstone for that individual's puerile and vindictive ax-grinding. It is therefore worthless as a review and should be deleted by the Amazon webmasters. That said, onto the more relevant matter of "Shadow Culture":
Taylor's articulation of the origins and history of one of the three main streams of psychology is an original and highly readable overview of the third stream of alternative spirituality and psychology (the other two being academic and clinical) which, in my 24 years of reading on the subject, has never been so well integrated into one volume. As a historian of Psychology and Psychiatry at Harvard, Taylor is a uniquely qualified "white-water raft guide" through the turbulent waters of these streams. We discover that the so-called New Age did not appear fully formed from the brow of the 1960s, but is merely the third irruption of this stream into our cultural consciousness - this time on a global scale, forming what Maslow called, "a world personality... that can adapt to a variety of different cultures but the essence of which transcends the limits of any given culture." (p.269) The latter part of the book, where Taylor explains the division of Humanistic Psychology into three subparts: Transpersonal Psaychology; Somatic and experiential therapies; and the radical "therapies" from which emerged anti-psychiatry, critical thinking and the human sciences, should be required reading for all psychology students.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Martin K. Meade, Jr. on May 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
Eugene Taylor offers a great explanation of the shadow culture in America since the first Great Awakening in this book. He explains every aspect of the spiritual history of the United States, including the Quakers, Shakers, Transcendentalists, Swamis, and even the counter-culture of the 1960s. I especially enjoyed the section on the Americanization of the theories of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. I recommend this book to anyone with an interest in psychology or religious studies. As a student of both, I found this book to be an excellent mixture of both disciplines.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is worth a read. The late Dr. Taylor has written a thoughtful and in-depth account of America's Shadow Culture. Decide for yourself if the book has merit. Don't be misled by the myopia of others.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again