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Shadowglass (Shadowfae Chronicles) Paperback – March 2, 2010


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Shadowglass (Shadowfae Chronicles) + Shadowfae (Shadowfae Chronicles #1) + Blood Cursed (Shadowfae Chronicles)
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Product Details

  • Series: Shadowfae Chronicles (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 342 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; 1 edition (March 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312578016
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312578015
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,677,618 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. This engaging sequel to 2009's Shadowfae weaves rich sensual imagery and dark eroticism into a breathless thriller plot. Thieving fairies, vampire gangsters, powerful demon lords, and creepy earth-bound angels all compete in a frenetic, bloody race to gain possession of a powerful magical artifact, a tiny mirror from Hell that destroys inhibitions. Light-fingered party girl Ice, a strawberry-scented water fairy, finds herself brazenly indulging in both lust and brave anger after she steals the mirror from Kane, demon lord of decadent Melbourne. When she loses it, sexy metal fairy Indigo, attracted to Ice but fearful of connection, offers to betray alliances and help her regain the item, but his own mirror-taint makes him mercurial and impossible to trust. Hayes's characters have distinct and delightful voices, and she's developed considerable skill at blending the gritty and the supernatural. (Mar.)
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From Booklist

It’s party time at the bar in which deals are made, wings groped, substances wildly abused, and insecure, strawberry-scented Ice, a thieving fairy in a society of demons, lacks any semblance of cool as she fruitlessly throws herself at muscled-up Indigo. Drunk and horny, she settles for a quick-sex fix with “a demon lord” in the next bar stool—literally. Eros, dragon flame, vamp fangs, and barbed wings abound in this underworld in which banshee bodyguards watch over bad boys DiLuca, LaFaro, and Valenti, who unleash poisoned claws as black spines spring from their shoulder blades. Hayes’ fast-moving, graphically erotic, violence-filled fantasy alternates Ice’s first-person point of view accounts and third-person chapters as the plot revolves around a mirror Ice filches that weakens her into betraying a dear friend and shatters her self-control by giving her what she thought she wanted—namely, free-wheeling, confident bravery. She must somehow get rid of the mirror. But she still ought to be careful what she wishes for. For fans of slambang erotic fantasy action. --Whitney Scott

More About the Author

Erica Hayes was a law student, an air force officer, an editorial assistant and a musician, before finally landing her dream job: fantasy and romance writer.

She writes dark paranormal and urban fantasy romance, and her books feature tough, smart heroines and colourful heroes with dark secrets.

She hails from Australia, where she drifts from city to city, leaving a trail of chaos behind her. Currently, she's terrorizing the wilds of Northumberland.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 9 customer reviews
This series is the cure for the common urban fantasy novel.
Hailey Edwards
Urban fantasy does require a reader's suspension of disbelief, but face it: Don't give us a metalfae's wang and tell us it's not an iron rod.
Tez Miller
Kane warns Ice not to stare into the glass, but she can't help it.
Wendy L. Hines

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Baumann VINE VOICE on June 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
Plot Summary: Ice is a water faerie with a predilection for shiny baubles and late nights at the club. She years for a literal man-of-steel, a metal faerie named Indigo who constantly brushes off her advances. After a wild night spent in a demon lord's bed, Ice filches a magic mirror that poisons everyone it comes into contact with. After behaving even more wildly out of character than usual, Ice realizes that she must get rid of the wicked thing. Indigo is charged upon pain of eternal torment to get it back, and he manipulates Ice's attraction for him, but along the way he falls for her intoxicating personality.

This is a paranormal romance series like no other, and it's dark, scary, and incredibly erotic. It's also not afraid to get dirty, and it stinks of desperation sometimes. There are drugs, and drinks, and blood, and vomit, and stains of all kinds, and it's gloriously messy and vivid. I can't think of another author who drags me down to the seedy underbelly of a dark fantasy world in quite the same way, and for that reason I'll keep reading Erica Hayes' novels. She just blows me away in that regard.

The unconventional characters and their tortured romances may be tough for fans who want things a little cleaner, a little more predictable, but speaking as someone who OD'd on paranormal romances a few years ago, the Shadowfae Chronicles persuade me to dig into this genre again. The way that the faeries are portrayed is almost too realistic; they're clearly not human, and in fact, they were so alien at times that I had trouble connecting with Ice and Indigo. So that's what's holding me back on the rating, if you were wondering. I admire it like crazy, but I didn't emote with their story like I wanted to.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on March 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
In Melbourne, Ice the water fairy loves partying and petty thieving especially with her best friend Blaze the firefae. They heist some cash and diamonds from an apartment to pay their protection tab to the Valenti mob.

At a club where her beloved metallic fairy Indigo ignores her, Ice meets demon lord Kane. She steals a small mirror from him; an artifact he warned her not even look into, but the temptation proved too much. The mirror brought across from hell eliminates inhibitions as Ice learns first hand; everyone from mortal to supernatural want it. When she loses it, Ice fears Kane, rival demons, the mob and angels are coming for her and the missing mirror. Indigo, who stared at the mirror offers to find it, but to do so means betraying contractual partners,which Ice fears might leave her below the supernatural ooze since he has no inhibitions to adhere to any celestial code.

The second Shadowfae Australian erotic urban fantasy makes the supernatural and mafia landscape seem genuine. The story line is fast-paced from the moment the strawberry scented anti-heroine proudly wears the ice she stole and never slows down for a contractual moment. Fans will enjoy this entertaining tale as the mirror from Hell opens the soul to enable the viewer to seek what they wish for since nothing inside them will prevent them from trying.

Harriet Klausner
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tez Miller on March 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
In debt to Melbourne's paranormal mob, waterfae Ice steals jewels and other shinies, then pawns them for cash. She's also screwed-up when it comes to relationships - she's jealous of her friend Azure, who's secretly in love with their other friend Blaze, who has a thing for Ice, and she's kind of into him, too...All very daytime soap opera until the prime-time bitchiness comes out. Ice acquires a magic mirror of sorts, which communicates with those it meets. Squidgy, as Ice affectionately names it, gives its owners the courage to live out their secret desires, whether that's picking a fight with a bloke on the tram, or shagging the bloke with whom your BFF is in love. This is the more interesting plot.

And then there's Indigo. He's metalfae, which means it's difficult to discuss him without snark. Even his hair is "sharp", and bleeds Ice when she rakes it. The LSD-like descriptions are evocative, and don't cross the line into purple prose as often as one might assume. But when the time comes for Ice and Indigo to shag...the "logic-fail" really pulled me out of the story. Remember, Indigo is metalfae, but while his wang may be hard, it's still flesh. It's not a Wang of Steel. Indigo is not Iron Wang. It's a human wang, with real feelings.

Urban fantasy does require a reader's suspension of disbelief, but face it: Don't give us a metalfae's wang and tell us it's not an iron rod. Seriously.

But enough wangst about wangs, and onto the heavy stuff. Everyone has their period in this book, even the men. Not in those words, but it's evident in the characters' behaviour. So is the mirror really evil, or simply surfacing the owners' secret desires? It could be the latter, because everyone's a bitch.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MNix on July 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
For waterfae Ice, just surviving in Melbourne's paranormal underworld is a lot of work. Ice is a thief and a con artist, but she can barely make ends meet and she's overdue on protection payment to the local vampire mafia. So when Ice has a one night stand with the demon lord Kane and spies a magic mirror, she steals it. Unfortunately for Ice, the mirror isn't just a shiny showpiece; it possesses a powerful magic, one that threatens to drive her mad.

Metalfae Indigo is the one who stole the mirror for Kane and now he's in a bind. He has to steal the mirror - again - return it to its owner, and kill Ice, or face a fate worse than death. Indigo can't bring himself to destroy the fairy he desires above all others. But with demons at their back and mirror-induced madness at their front, it's clear that the clock's ticking for both Indigo and Ice.

Erica Hayes has a dark, gritty, wonderfully imaginative idea in Shadowglass that - like its predecessor in the Shadowfae Chronicles, Shadowfae - falls flat in execution. Reading Shadowglass is like being in an all-night rave...for weeks on end. It's bright, loud, shallow, and just too much. There's very little depth to be found in any of the characters, which makes sense for the fairies on some level because of their nature (though it doesn't explain the one-dimensional nature of the non-fae characters), but it makes it hard to become invested in the story. After finishing the story, the most I could really remember about Ice as a character was that she whined a lot in the beginning about being completely unattractive and no man wanted her so she got the leavings of her beautiful best friend...which I remember mostly because every major male character - except for the hero of the third book - wanted to have sex with her.
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