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Shadows In The Banquet Hall Original recording reissued


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Audio CD, Original recording reissued, October 1, 1997
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Electric-Acoustic Mandolin Rock. Rock music with Celtic, Country, Blugrass and Jazz influences.

From the Artist

A wide range of musical styles and song writing is expressed on this Richmond band's second independent album. Often haunting - yet always uplifting - Shadows represents equal parts "ether-electrified" porch music; hyper-country/bluegrass tinged pop; blues/jazz jam concoctions, hints of Irish-traditional influenced rock and the acoustic guitar stripped bare. Colorfully lyrical, musically ambitious in style; Shadows in the Banquet Hall is a cohesive and positive album that brings you into a vibrant landscape, inviting you to share in a celebratory feast of the imagination, and to grin at life's bitter-sweet experiences. 16 page booklet includes unique artwork for each songs lyrics.

1. ) Wolftrap & Fireflies
2. ) Atica's Flower Box Window
3. ) Come Again?
4. ) Flood
5. ) Reunion Monticello
6. ) November (makebelieve)
7. ) Summer Song
8. ) Blind Session Eye
9. ) Message To Me
10. ) For The Girl
11. ) Dusk

Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 1, 1997)
  • Original Release Date: October 1, 1997
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued
  • Label: Constant Ivy Music
  • ASIN: B00003YSMD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #169,756 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Éponine Thénardier on September 18, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I absolutely adore this album! Relative to CL's other albums, it has more eloquent lyrics than "Meander," but rocks just as hard in a more intelligent way, has stand-out songs as opposed to "Ether-Inspired Porch Music" (where the songs blend together pleasantly), is far less Celtic than "Echo Echo," and not mellow at all like "Indian Summer."

The chord progressions are phenomenal -- especially in "Summer Song" and "November/Make Believe"-- the songs will go places you won't expect and it's just amazing. I've listened to this CD hundreds of times, and the musicianship never fails to astound me. The acoustic guitar-work is to die for! Barry's voice ranges from husky to uber-clear, from smooth as silk to a rockin' scream. If you've never fallen in love with that velvet-voiced cutie Barry Privett, you need to do it now. Of all the albums, this one showcases his diverse vocal talents the best.

This is one of my favorite albums ever. It's perfect for driving -- it seemed like it was meant to be listened on a bright morning drive through the Appalachians, when you're flying at 75 mph amongst the conifers. It just makes you happy; I don't think it is possible to listen to "Shadows" and not feel uplifted.

Fans of "Indian Summer" and "Ether" might be a little shocked by this at first, but give it a few runs in your CD player before dismissing it as a an album not by the Carbon Leaf you know and love. It is first and foremost a rock album; CL has mellowed considerable since this was made in the late 90s.

See these boys live if you ever have the chance. I saw them open for Guster -- and it was Carbon Leaf that got the standing ovation, not Guster. CL should have been headlining, judging from the enthusiastic crowd reaction.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Genevieve LeClerc on June 23, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Before Carbon Leaf got "ether-electrified", before Carter Gravatt began rocking on a mandolin, before Barry Privett was dancing jigs with his pennywhistle, and Jordan Medas signed on and brought his strong bass chops to the group, Carbon Leaf released Shadows In The Banquet Hall. Shadows is more of a rock album, although the distinctive acoustic guitar pluck we have come to know from Carter on subsequent albums is present. That more bluegrass-tinged acoustic guitar is apparent on several songs, including Wolftrap and Fireflies, Attica's Flower Box Window and Reunion Monticello. On the rock side of the spectrum we find songs like Blind Session Eye, with its cleverly arranged guitar licks, driving beat and hard rockin' jam at the end.

The overall flow of the album is mellow and thoughtful, due in large part to Barry's intelligent, abstract, somewhat esoteric lyrics. This is not to imply that they are inaccessable though. The songs simply require a careful listener, one who is willing to let their mind travel along with the music, through the stories and emotions being expressed. An example of this is Summer Song, which is able to convey a beautiful portrait of summers come and gone through brief lyrical phrases that impart different images in the listener's mind, but still leave them free to weave those images into their own memories and experiences. Barry has an ability to create lyrics that the listener can so openly relate to and apply to his or her own life. This great talent comes into full bloom on future albums, but is doubtless evident on Shadows too.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Michael Hardy on March 31, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This recording is less accessible than their later Echo Echo, but it rewards the patient listener. Carbon Leaf's gift is the ability to create gorgeous soundscapes that perfectly reflect the lyrics of each song. That gift is in full flower here, and the result is an album that coheres as a whole. Expect to need a few listens before it worms its way into your head, but once it does, you'll never forget it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lee Armstrong HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 13, 2008
Format: Audio CD
This CD is over a decade old. "Indian Summer" had some classic tracks from this Virginia band; so when I saw this disc @ a $2 sale, I eagerly snapped it up. "Shadows in the Banquet Hall" is quite different from the later set by Carbon Leaf. "Flood" is instrumentally a strong track, but the lead vocalist doesn't have the most expressive voice. The fancy folk guitar on "November (Makebelieve)" makes it memorable while the vocals seem to suit the unusual lyric, "Redcoats raid the Raincoats' space, soul to storm upon each face, Clouds with roving eyes set sail, cannon cottonballs of hail." The wistful verse on "Summer Song" juxtaposes with the electrified guitar storm on the chorus to create a hybrid of moods, "Bat away a hurricane's eyelash, ushering by the season past." In retrospect, "Shadows in the Banquet Hall" shows a creative emerging band. The lyrics are creative, but so strange that they often fail to create an emotional bond with the listener. The lead vocalist doesn't carry an entire CD, IMHO. I will probably pull this disc out and spin it a few more times before moving on. Enjoy!
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