Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $2.83 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used Copy With Moderate Wear Including Rubbing To The Corners - May Include Some Notes and Marks - Overall A Nice Previously Handled Copy
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Shakespeare Wrote for Money Paperback


Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.17
$6.48 $4.00

Frequently Bought Together

Shakespeare Wrote for Money + Housekeeping vs. the Dirt + More Baths Less Talking: Notes from the Reading Life of a Celebrated Author Locked in Battle with Football, Family, and Time Itself
Price for all three: $33.66

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: McSweeney's (December 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1934781290
  • ISBN-13: 978-1934781296
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #563,076 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Nick Hornby is the author of the novels A Long Way Down, How to Be Good (a New York Times bestseller), High Fidelity, and About a Boy, and of the memoir Fever Pitch. He is also the author of Songbook, a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award, and editor of the short-story collection Speaking with the Angel. He is also the recipient of the American Academy of Arts and Letters E. M. Forster Award, and the Orange Word International Writers London Award 2003.

Customer Reviews

He always engages the reader.
Ida's girl
Reading a great book about reading good books and writing, written by a great (and a personal favorite) writer.
Kelsey May Dangelo
I stumbled on this book at a library book sale last weekend.
takingadayoff

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I knew nothing about Nick Hornby's monthly "Stuff I've Been Reading" columns in "Believer" magazine until yesterday when I came across this book in my local bookstore, bought it on impulse, and then read it in a couple hours. If you too are unfamiliar with Hornby's column, it was an amiable and often humorous survey of the books Hornby had bought and those he had read the previous month. SHAKESPEARE WROTE FOR MONEY (I guess I somehow missed the source or derivation of that title) is a collection of 15 "Stuff I've Been Reading" columns, the third and last such collection.

SHAKESPEARE WROTE FOR MONEY is on the meager side (131 pages), but that is one of only two criticisms. Hornby's reading interests are diverse and eclectic, and his columns are informal and informative, never stuffy or donnish, and usually both fun and funny. The quality of the last three columns (and this is the second criticism) dropped markedly, as if Hornby was losing interest and motivation, and indeed in the last column he announces that he is quitting the gig. A bonus is the funny and kind introduction from Sarah Vowell, whose humor and style is similar to Hornby's.

Examples of Hornby's (1) wit and (2) insight:

(1) Hornby juxtposes a book about the Band and another about the Stasi: "It goes without saying that the two wires that led me to the books * * * came from different sockets in the soul, and power completely different * * * electrical/spiritual devices: [the books] are as different as a hair dryer and a Hoover. Yes. That's it. I'm the first to admit it when my metaphors don't work, but I'm pretty sure I pulled that one off. (I wish I'd hated them both. Then I could have said that one sucks, and the other blows.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By C. Ebeling on November 25, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Shakespeare Wrote For Money" is Nick Hornby's latest and last collection of his "Stuff I've Been Reading" columns from "The Believer Magazine." The format, a monthly informal essay that begins with a list of books bought and a list of those actually read, is conversational and personal. The first collection, "The Polysyllabic Spree" was a winning surprise, turbo charged with Hornby's wit, enthusiasm and authentic warmth for books, his audience and life in general, all delivered in a caffeine-jolted voice. He's the cool kid on the bus who lets us all sit with him. You get the idea he cares what we think. He never apologizes for being punch-drunk in love with reading.

Now at the end of his "Stuff" career, his voice and style are no longer a surprise but remain something to enjoy. He's not bouncing off the walls anymore, which makes one wonder if he's traded to decaf and quit smoking. He takes some breaks, too; and there's one month where football on television became a priority and another when he's reviewing films to vote in the Brit version of the Academy Awards. But when he's on, he's on, as when he wants to wholly admire "On Chesil Beach" but he can't entirely let go an unintentional anachronism author Ian McEwan lets slip in a reference to the Beatles and the Stones. He wonders what's wrong with flinching when reading "The Road" by Cormac McCarthy. This time around (columns from 2006 to his last, September 2008), Hornby discovers, for starters, a wonderland in Young Adult novels, chats up his brother-in-law's books because they deserve it, and notes how many recent books are devoted to particular years, like "1599: A Year in the Life of Shakespeare."

I came away with some titles to follow up on and a lot of fun conversation from the other side of the pond. I don't blame him for moving on, but I'll miss these columns.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A. Anderson on October 20, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I discovered Nick Hornby by accident when I picked up the The Polysyllabic Spree, the first of the three collections of his book criticism originally written for the Believer magazine. He followed Spree with Housekeeping vs. the Dirt and ends (unfortunately) with Shakespeare Wrote for Money. The title is a throw away line from the book but is also classic Hornby. This little demythifacation (is that a word?)of the Bard tells us that Hornby realizes that any writer is first, a person (like himself) who struggles to get words on paper in a satisfying order, with narrative arc and skill, who is also trying to Say Something worth reading. And, maybe, make a living. There is not an ounce of oracular pronouncement, not a whit of assuming he is better read than you or I (but, of course, he is) and he jabs at High Literary Merit criticism on a regular basis. Hornby is funnier than you and I are, in that dry British way I can only envy. Barred, he says, from saying anything unkind about any writer, he still manages to point out that some books, while they may deserve to be printed (writers need to eat, after all), do not deserve to be discussed. His enthusiasms can be enormous, but they are replaced (or augmented) a month or two later with a new enthusiasm. He takes time off to root for Arsenal (his home team), tease his friends (Sarah Vowell comes up), smoke and to be thrilled and a teeny bit jealous of the writers who conquer narrative arcs, effective language and insight.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa0a3a3cc)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?