He Shall Thunder in the Sky: An Amelia Peabody Mystery and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.47
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

He Shall Thunder in the Sky Mass Market Paperback – Print, April 3, 2001


See all 20 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback, Print, April 3, 2001
$0.79 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$5.22

War Brides by Helen Bryan
War Brides by Helen Bryan
When four women reunite in an English village to commemorate the end of a war they lived through together, television cameras miss the more newsworthy angle: The women's mission is not only to commemorate—they've also returned to settle a score and avenge one of their own. Learn more | See related books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Amelia Peabody, Book 12
  • Mass Market Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Avon (April 3, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380798581
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380798582
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (171 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,306,803 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

He Shall Thunder in the Sky completes an internal quartet (which also includes Seeing a Large Cat, The Ape Who Guards the Balance, and The Falcon at the Portal) within Elizabeth Peters's legendary series starring Amelia Peabody, the intrepid Edwardian Egyptologist, her husband, Emerson, and her extended family. The quartet comprises not only Amelia's diary of those years but also parts of a mysterious "Manuscript H," an omniscient viewpoint that allows a glimpse into the minds of Amelia's son--the dashing and brilliant Ramses--and her ward, Nefret Forth, as they mature into adults with their own secrets and agendas. The Falcon at the Portal left readers hanging impatiently in the enormous rift that book's events gouged between Ramses and Nefret, both madly in love but unrelentingly proud.

The winter of 1914-15 finds the Peabody-Emerson family back in Cairo--now under British martial law, with the Suez Canal under constant threat of attack from the Ottoman Empire. The city's young Englishmen are rushing to enlist, except for Ramses, who is widely scorned for his pacifism. Yet Amelia and Emerson soon find out that Ramses is (literally) playing a mysterious and potentially explosive part in the conflict between Egyptian nationalists and the British authorities, for reasons both political and familial. Nefret, for her part, is still running a health clinic for the city's fallen women and trying to avoid the attentions of Percy, Amelia's odious nephew. In the meantime, the Emersons' excavations at Giza reveal an unexpected treasure so remarkable that the uneasy Amelia immediately senses the fine hand of Sethos, the Master Criminal (who through many previous books has alternately plagued her and protested his boundless affection for her), at work. The climax and denouement are entirely worth the price of admission--tying up a decade's worth of loose strings and explaining some nagging points so subtle that less observant readers might easily have missed them. It's Peters's great gift that in the grand scheme of things, no clues are wasted. Her plotting is wonderfully complex and intriguing, and it fits seamlessly into the detailed historical background she builds so carefully. It may have taken years for her to complete this four-part dance (she promises more Amelia Peabody mysteries in the future), but she's charmed us right out of our dancing slippers along the way. --Barrie Trinkle --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Excavating in Egypt on the eve of World War I, Amelia Peabody is in trouble with the British ex-pat community for her pacifist beliefs even as her nemesis--Sethos, the Master Criminal--reappears.
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

I have read every one of her books at least 3-4 times each.
251Ehmyay
While this is a wonderful book, if you don't read the rest of the series first you will not enjoy it one tenth as much as you could.
C P
It connects into a very important mystery that is resolved just at the end of the book.
Donald Mitchell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

97 of 97 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
For all those who, like me, were frustrated by The Falcon and the Portal, this definitely makes everything worthwhile. Nefret's behavior is not forgotten, and her "transformation" in this novel is realistic as are the explanations given for her previous decisions. Amelia - who decidedly makes up for any "lack" of expressed maternal instincts in this novel -- and Emerson's deductive reasonings (though still quite slow on the uptake on Nefret and Ramses) are back on target, and resolution is at hand -- finally! In fact, the book ties up so many loose ends (including the identity of the Master Criminal) that have occurred throughout the series, I did wonder if indeed this novel was the last we see of the Peabody/Emerson clan -- I certainly hope not!
"Thunder" is in some ways a more complex read than usual, as it is carries on many, many different plots and subplots, each complete with varying subtexts, and, being ignorant myself of the Egyptian/British situation and involvement circu WWI, it was a little difficult to keep track of what was going on and why. In addition, everyone in the family has their own agenda that, for their own reasons (most are valid), they are keeping from everyone else. But, despite the complexity, it is unequivocably a wonderful, satisfying read, and worth every minute spent on its 400 pages. And, if you are, like me, a romantic at heart, the last five pages are "worth the price of admission! Enjoy, it's wonderful!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
74 of 74 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
It has arrived and all fans are rejoicing! I rushed to buy the book and couldn't wait to start reading it. Everyone who has read the previous books in this series will thoroughly enjoy this new and thrilling installment. I did and now I have to read it again more slowly since I rushed through it the first time.
If you have never read any of the Amelia Peabody books, buy this one but don't read it first. It is more fun to start at least with the first book featuring the adult Ramses, Seeing A Large Cat. Although I recommend getting to know his parents first in the first book of the series, Crocodile on the Sandbank. Why would you want to deny yourself some of the best summer reading available? These books offer adventure, romance, intrigue, mystery and some educational material about both Egyptology and the Victorian Age. You get to learn while enjoying a great read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
72 of 72 people found the following review helpful By C P on May 3, 2000
Format: Hardcover
As a faithful reader for some 10+ years now, I was a little disappointed with the previous Peabody book (A Falcon at the Portal). In fact, I nearly threw it out of the car, in which I was reading, at several points in the story. The joy I feel after finishing this book is 100 times greater than any problem I had with the last book. I am deeply indepted to Elizabeth Peters for creating characters that provoke such strong emotions. This book delivers the all wit, adventure, and plot twists I have come to expect from an Amelia Peabody mystery and more. While this is a wonderful book, if you don't read the rest of the series first you will not enjoy it one tenth as much as you could. Start with Crocodile on the Sandbank and don't stop until you've finished this one. You won't regret a minute of it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
96 of 100 people found the following review helpful By Kelly on June 1, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I've been a fan of the Peabody-Emersons for several years now, and have re-read all of the books at least 5 times. And like everyone else, Falcon left me on the edge of a cliff. Thankfully, Thunder brought me back. I arranged my schedule around buying and reading this book, and wasn't disappointed. (and yes, I had to read the last chapter first! ) but even knowing what happened in the end, I still loved every minute of Thunder. I loved the character development between Ramses and his parents -Amelia, who is told by Emerson in Mummy Case to be more demonstrative to her son, shows glimpses her strong feelings for her son through "measured looks" and "berserker rages," but I cried along with her at Ramses's bedside.
As Ramses has grown, so has his friend David (who look enough alike to be brothers) and his "sister" Nefret. Their relationship with each other, and with the Emerson Srs, gets better with each passing book. Even my mom (another longtime fan) commented that one of the best things in Thunder is the characters- Peters has stayed true to her characters, and we see how even in Falcon, she was always true to Nefret.
In Thunder, loose ends are tied up with the characters we have grown to know and love (or hate)- Abdullah, Selim, Sethos, Percy, Wardani, Asslimi, and more. The continuity and foreshadowing - Amelia's famous premonitions- is fantastic from Crocodile on the Sandbank to Thunder in the Sky.
My only hope- in the next book, can we have less international intrigue and more good old-fashioned tomb robber villians? Peters has made characters so strong that they don't need spygames to be riveting- a few of Amelia & Emerson's discussions will do the trick!
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
43 of 43 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 3, 2000
Format: Hardcover
After reading The Falcon at the Portal last fall, anticipation for Thunder built to a fever pitch. So when I obtained a copy of the book last night, I promptly ensconced myself on the sofa, blocked out the world for 3 hours, and finally put the book down with a sigh of complete -- satisfaction. Peters has done an excellent job with this one. Expectations have been so high that one might fear no mere book could meet them, but I think Thunder does. Many loose ends are tied up, mysteries unraveled, characters more fully and richly developed (including some delightful info. about Emerson and Amelia). The plot moves at a good pace, displaying what must have been extensive research by Peters on the Middle East and Egypt during World War I. Many comments on Falcon focused on the characters and relationship of NEfret and Ramses, and the supposed inconsistencies. I'll try not to give anything away, but will say that in Thunder a number of actions become plain. We are given deeper glimpses of both characters, Ramses in particular. I think he is Peter's best character, possibly because she's been working on him his entire life. There are also some great scenes between Ramses and both parents. And Sethos - how could I forget him? Yes, he appears again, and yes, his identity is finally and fully revealed. The climax of the book is so intense that for a minute it borders on melodrama ( a family proclivity, as Ramses remarks) but it manages to avoid it. All in all, an excellent book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

ELIZABETH PETERS, whose New York Times best-selling novels are often set against historical backdrops, earned a Ph.D. in Egyptology at the University of Chicago. She also writes best-selling books under the pseudonym Barbara Michaels. She lives in Frederick, Maryland.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?