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Shapechanger's Song (Chronicles of the Cheysuli, Bk. 1: Shapechangers and Bk. 2: The Song of Homana) Mass Market Paperback – March 1, 2001


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Frequently Bought Together

Shapechanger's Song (Chronicles of the Cheysuli, Bk. 1: Shapechangers and Bk. 2: The Song of Homana) + Legacy of the Wolf: Cheysuli Omnibus #2 + The Lion Throne (Chronicles of the Cheysuli - Omnibus Four)
Price for all three: $24.27

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: DAW (March 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0886779766
  • ISBN-13: 978-0886779764
  • Product Dimensions: 1.4 x 4.1 x 6.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #489,198 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jennifer Roberson is the author of the Sword-Dancer Saga and the Chronicles of the Cheysuli, and collaborated with Melanie Rawn and Kate Elliott on the historical fantasy The Golden Key, a finalist for the World Fantasy Award. She has also published three historical novels, and several in other genres. An exhibitor and breeder of Cardigan Welsh Corgis, she lives on acreage in Northern Arizona with eight dogs and two cats. She is currently working on the third Karavans novel, with prologue available at her website, http://www.cheysuli.com/author/Index.html.

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Customer Reviews

All in all I would recommend this book to all fantasty lovers out there.
Angie
The main character is a poor female heroine, I can't really see anything in her I admire or even relate to.
Amazon Customer
I couldn't even finish book 7, let alone read book 8, because it was so repetative.
J. H. Staib

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Angie, When will those clouds all disappear? on August 2, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
First of all, I'd like to say that I hate when reviewers tell others to ignore those reviews that disagree with them, as if only their own opinion is valid. I hope any who reads these reviews in order to decide whether it is a book they want to read will look at them all with an open mind. That said...

I loved the intricacy of the world, and became infatuated with the Cheysuli as a race. I had a bit of a love/hate relationship with the characters, however. The only characters I consistently liked were the Lir. Reasons: I got really tired of Alix's hypocrisy very quickly. Her cries against racial prejudice while possessing the same got old fast. I was relieved when she finally seemed to get over it, but I would have appreciated it never having been there to begin with, since it was an inconsistency in her character.

I also had a few problems with the Cheysuli. Their attitude toward women rather surprised me coming from a female author. They seem to place a woman's value ENTIRELY on her ability to bring children into the world. As if that isn't enough, Finn (who for some reason some reviewers are in love with) admits that he's willing to commit rape in order to try to replenish their dwindling numbers. I see no shame from him about this fact, and it wouldn't bother me if he was a villain. But Finn is a character I am expected to like. I am expected to like an unrepentant would-be rapist.

The author has an unhealthy love of adverbs as well. Candles should flicker, not glow flickeringly. People frown at other people. Don't stare frowningly, that sounds ridiculous. Her editor should be slapped for allowing such abuse of grammar. It comes across as incredibly unprofessional.

I will continue reading this series because the world has a lot of promise, and I'm going to hold onto some hope that these problems might be worked out and it might be improved upon. I'll cross my fingers.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Smart Little Magpie on January 17, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'm sure you can find better reading on shapeshifters, if you like the idea. I hadn't read any books on this particular fantasy concept before, so I read this whole volume (containing the first 2 books in this series) when a friend gave it to me. I don't know how I got through both books; maybe for the same reason I can watch one or two episodes of a Bravo show when I'm really, really bored and want to watch some heavy-handed made-for-TV epic interpersonal interaction failures. But at least that takes less time!

Pros of this book:
- makes you feel good about your own amateur writing skill
- I actually liked the phonetics of most of Roberson's race and place names and of her created language
- the intro is hilarious; the author basically brags about her "success" when in actuality, she tells us about how much she has always sucked

Cons:
- Astounding levels of traditional sexism. Roberson says in her intro that male readers wrote to her about how another story she wrote "opened their eyes to women as people," so I was expecting to see some strong female characters here as well. However, for all that Alix has special powers, her real value in the story lies in her womb. Her "strong will" is just pig-headed stubbornness, which leads to stupid decisions that magically work out due to her main-character glow. The potential for her to defy expectations, break down gender roles, and become a powerful player in her own right, comes to nothing by the end of the first book, at which point it dies because the second book is about Carillon. So in sum, Alix is only special because of her racial heritage, not because of her personality or actions.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By stephanie on April 16, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This first book in a set of eight draws you into a world of magic and intrigue. It starts with Alix, a croft girl infatuated with the prince of her homeland, when both are kidnapped by a Cheysuli Shapechanger they are forced to acknowledge their own personal beliefs about the treatment of the exiled Cheysuli. Alix must come to accept her true (Cheysuli) heritage and ultimately her place in the prophecy that governs this magically race. The entire set is so well written a person gets lost in the story and will find herself reading for hours, so intranced, she feels she is part of its happenings and eager to find out what will happen next. The Chronicles span nearly 100 years and the intertwining of Cheysuli and four other races to complete the prophecy. There is danger and mystery, love and loss and enough emotion to move even the hardest of hearts. Ms. Roberson makes a person feel as if each emotion is her own. I have had the complete set for years and find myself re-reading it over and over again just to relive it all. I just hope that Jennifer Roberson will see fit to add to the collection and epic so we can all go back to Homana and the power of the Cheysuli.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Fionwe on November 7, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I barely made it through the first book before giving up on this series. Around 60% of the story seems to consist of the exact same circular conversations and arguments over and over and over and over... There are many other problems, the grating nature of almost all of the characters, the lack of world building (which was sad because the Cheysuli had the potential to be quite interesting), but it's the repetition that really got to me. Conversations that had to happen once, maybe twice just kept resurfacing, which finally made me realize, this apparently "strong-willed" heroin never actually does anything, never takes action to change her situation other than to whine about it again and again. This apparently fascinating culture is never actually explained except when the characters mumble sagely (and vaguely) about "the prophesy", which they do again and again so that the culture never acquires any depth.
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