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Race and the Shaping of Twentieth-Century Atlanta (Fred W. Morrison Series in Southern Studies) Paperback – August 28, 2000

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Race and the Shaping of Twentieth-Century Atlanta (Fred W. Morrison Series in Southern Studies) + Atlanta: Race, Class And Urban Expansion (Comparitive American Cities)
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Extremely well-researched, masterfully argued, and, notwithstanding the abundant detail, easily read."Journal of American Ethnic History"

Review

Ron Bayor has demonstrated the frightening intersection of race and policy in shaping the city that boasted it was 'Too Busy to Hate.' This is an important study of the making--and distorting--of a modern metropolis.--Julian Bond, University of Virginia

|This comprehensive presentation of race as the principal factor in the shaping of a city is a valuable contribution to urban and African-American history.--Reviews in American History

|Energized with insights and anecdotal information. . . . An important and ground-breaking study of Atlanta and its development during the twentieth century. Ron Bayor's book is a must-read for those who study the history of this city.--Atlanta History

|A significant historical account of deplorable, and often appalling, developments. . . . Ronald Bayor's work exposes the vast gap that existed between the pretty racial picture of Atlanta that the city's white power structure consistently tried to purvey and the racial reality.--Mississippi Quarterly

|A richly detailed, perceptive examination of the powerful force of race in shaping the American city. Bayor has expertly and graphically portrayed the enormous burden in time, energy, dollars, human pain, and wasted human resources levied by urban racism and the policy of apartheid.--American Historical Review

|A sweeping assessment. . . . The definitive case study of race relations and public policy in twentieth-century Atlanta. It is extremely well-researched, masterfully argued, and, notwithstanding the abundant detail, easily read.--Journal of American Ethnic History

|Bayor shows that despite its well known slogan, 'the city too busy to hate,' and its popular image as a progressive southern city, Atlanta's race relations were similar to other segregated cities.--Choice

|Time after time, Bayor demonstrates how racially-based policy decisions made during the era of segregation have left a corrosive legacy in Atlanta, despite shifting power relations. While legal segregation has been toppled and African Americans have made political gains, deep racial divides, increasingly intertwined with class, continue to mark the city. . . . Belong[s] on the still short but growing 'must read' list on Atlanta history.--Southern Changes

|[Bayor] displays an impressive grasp of how white citizens used public policy to segregate and subordinate black Atlantans--in everything from health care and education to residential patterns and the placement of roads, from elections and employment to parks, and police and fire services. . . . Bayor effectively documents how race, even when unacknowledged, has played a major role in shaping Atlanta.--Atlanta Journal-Constitution

|A marvelous study of the role of race in the development of Atlanta. . . . Well-written and analytically engaging, Race and the Shaping of Twentieth-Century Atlanta makes a substantial contribution toward developing a broader understanding of the importance of race in the planning, development and administration of twentieth-century urban America and will prove valuable reading for historians of African America, city planners, urban historians and anyone else who is interested in understanding the complexity of the forces at work in American cities, and how at least one American city has come to be the way it is.--Journal of Social History

|In writing his revealing portrait of Atlanta, Bayor has taken a fresh perspective by analyzing white racism as a determinant of spatial development, of the growth of social and economic institutions, and of the course of politics in the twentieth century. . . . Bayor has added significantly to our understanding of the implications of race by demonstrating the costs of segregation for white as well as for black citizens, both of whom were losers as Atlanta grew and apparently prospered.--Journal of Southern History

|[This book] breaks new ground in the urban dimension of twentieth-century race relations. In unprecedented detail Ronald Bayor demonstrates the wide gap between the rhetoric and reality of Atlanta's reputation for progressive race relations and does so in a non-preachy, restrained, and compelling manner. A real triumph.--Howard N. Rabinowitz, University of New Mexico

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Product Details

  • Series: Fred W. Morrison Series in Southern Studies
  • Paperback: 350 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press (August 28, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807848980
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807848982
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.9 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,363,816 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By eleveen on July 22, 2002
Format: Paperback
If you live in Atlanta and wonder why its Briarcliff becomes Moreland when you cross Ponce, why Marta [stinks], or why even now this vibrant city seems so segregated, you need to read this book. It is an enlightening (if at some points dense) view of the history of Atlanta from the perspective on race and especially for my generation (those who grew up after the civil rights movement) it is a book about the side of race relations you can not truly fathom until you are able to put Atlanta of the past together with Atlanta today.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 28, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Over the years, Ronald Bayor has produced compelling research on ethnicity in neighborhoods in New York. Now he brings that level of analysis to the city he has called home since 1973.

For those interested in the subject, it's a well written history. For current and former Atlanta residents it is also a difficult read. How wonderful would Atlanta be today if it had truly been "The City Too Busy to Hate?" Bayor methodically walks through the city's post-Civil War history, documenting the racist and segregationist origin of schools, streets, buildings and posts. Rather than a monolith of white vs. black, you see a range of individuals and groups, some wanting to stop the absurd fixation on race but unable to effect change. For example, in affluent areas of Southwest Atlanta, a group of affluent white families welcomed integrating with the affluent black families moving into the area. Bayor follows the families at school board meetings asking for the school system to assure it will support the school rather than giving it the low resourcing traditionally afforded black schools. But the school system was busy elsewhere. And so the affluent families left - white to the northside and black families to private school.
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Race and the Shaping of Twentieth-Century Atlanta (Fred W. Morrison Series in Southern Studies)
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