Buy New
$16.25
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.99
  • Save: $3.74 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Shawshank Redemption: The Shooting Script (Newmarket Shooting Script) Paperback – September 30, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-1557042460 ISBN-10: 1557042462 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $16.25
45 New from $10.67 44 Used from $4.33
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.25
$10.67 $4.33

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Visualize Your Script: Hey screenwriters, check out Amazon Storyteller, a new (and free) tool from Amazon Studios that turns scripts into storyboards. Learn more.


Frequently Bought Together

Shawshank Redemption: The Shooting Script (Newmarket Shooting Script) + Sudden Flash Youth: 65 Short-Short Stories (Karen and Michael Braziller Books) + Screenplay: Writing the Picture, 2nd Edition
Price for all three: $47.95

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Series: Newmarket Shooting Script
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Newmarket Press; 1 edition (September 30, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557042462
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557042460
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #42,545 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A miraculous triumph of art over the buck. -- Stephen King, from his introduction

Excellent ...the added value sets this book apart from other published scripts and makes it a worthy read. -- Creative Screenwriting

Frank Darabont, with this one work, declares himself a special talent. -- Gene Siskel, Chicago Tribune

Intriguing...Genuine insights and anecdotes on a film already considered by many to be a true classic. -- Fade In

About the Author

Frank Darabont's first two feature films received Best Picture Academy Award® nominations: The Shawshank Redemption (1994) and The Green Mile (1999). Other film and TV projects include The Majestic (2001), The Mist (2007), and AMC's The Walking Dead, among many others.



Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. Among his most recent are 11/22/63, Under the Dome, and the Dark Tower novels Cell, From a Buick 8, Everything's Eventual, Hearts in Atlantis, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, and Bag of Bones. His acclaimed nonfiction book, On Writing, was also a bestseller. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
17
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 21 customer reviews
Overall, the book adds depth to an already excellent cinematic experience.
Jim Carson
An interesting peek in how the movie was created from Stephen King's original story and re-made in Darabont's image.
Susan B. Iwanisziw
Now, everyone knows how good the movie is, but reading this takes it to a whole different level.
James Wotzko

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Jim Carson on July 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
The shooting script contains forewards (by Stephen King by Frank Darabont), the screenplay, changes from the screenplay to the movie, some final thoughts by Darabont, and the credits.
It's fascinating reading the screenplay after seeing the movie, then reading the changes made in to the screenplay and why. For example, in scene 36, Andy approaches Red to buy a rock hammer and they agree on ten dollars. In the movie, it just happens and we overlook the question on how Andy would have gotten the money in the first place.
In the screen play, we find out in scenes 40 and 41 where he got the money (brought in with him ... internally). However, later, the book explains how the scene read well, but didn't work well on the screen. In retrospect, we don't really *care* that he had money anyway, so the scene is easily dropped without sacrificing clarity.
The book adds some interesting "inside" information. For example, when we first see Red meeting with the parole board, the file has a picture of him when he was younger. This photo is actually a cameo by Morgan Freeman's son, Alfonso, who also provided some of the background voices during the "Fresh Fish" taunting in the early part of the movie.
Overall, the book adds depth to an already excellent cinematic experience.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Edna A. Pierce on August 29, 2001
Format: Paperback
As Frank Darabont says in the introduction of the book, who else would buy the screenplay unless they really want to know more about the film? Sticking to that idea, Darabont has given the film student/buff, and those who simply love the movie, a real treat with this book. Not only does it contain the screenplay, it's the screenplay (I emphasize) AS IT WAS WRITTEN BEFORE FILMING. He's published it exactly as he wrote it when he adapted it from King's novella. I point this out because, as Darabont himself points out in the intro, so many screenplays that are thrown out by merchandise wizards are nothing but the finished movie transcribed. And really, what good is that to someone who wants a deeper knowledge of the film?
Not only does he give us the original screenplay, he gives us a scene-by-scene comparison of the screenplay vs. the finished film, and why things got changed/added/left out. This, in particular, says a lot about Darabont to me. This is a man who wants to use his work not only to be what it is (a GREAT film), but to educate as well. This book inspires. He includes storyboards, as well (including a storyboard for a deleted scene- oh, goody, goody!) and introductions by both himself and Stephen King, and a summarizing bit of advice to budding filmmakers and screenwriters. I devoured this book in short time (one night), lol, and found myself going back to the film to compare and analyze- if you don't do the same after reading it, I'll eat my foot.. okay, maybe not. But something drastic, I warrant you. If you are at all inclined to learn about filmmaking, writing, or even if you just love "The Shawshank Redemption" (which is what lead me to the book in the first place), this is a real must-have.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 11, 1999
Format: Paperback
I really liked the book and the movie itself. Stephen King, for sure, didn't intend when he wrote Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption to emphasize a lot on the character of Andy. I think the basic character is the Morgan Freeman one. Frank Darabont, emphasized on both characters, Andy and Red. I have to ask myself, it's the redemption of who and of what? Is it the redemption of Andy, of Red, of Warren...? I think it's the redemption of all the characters in the book. At the end each one of them took what he deserved. Warren Suicide, Andy Freedom, and Red Hope. The brilliant thing about Shawshank Redemption script and movie is that the reader can't know what will happen and can estimate nothing untill the end of the story, there's no meaning of hope yet. What's hope in that movie? Is it something that we usually loose when we grow older under certain TERRIBLE conditions? Red lost all hope of getting outside Shawshank, at a certain time he wasn't willing to go out, he can never face the outside. Shawshank made him a machine man with machine heart and machine mind. Andy remind him back of his humanity, and hope is what deferenciates humans from other living species. I realized at the end that Hope is Freedom and it's not the opposite. When you have hope you can be free and when you don't you can never be free. The difference between Red and Andy is that Andy always believed in hope and that thing made him free, Red got out of Shawshank after 40 years and he was not free. Red started to feel freedom ("I think it's the excitement only a freemam can feel, a freeman at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain") when he regain hope and broke all rules and went to see his friend Andy. Hope is like dreams, when you lose it you lose your existence and therefore your humanity.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By James Wotzko on April 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
Wow. This is the first word that came to my mind after finishing reading this screenplay. Now, everyone knows how good the movie is, but reading this takes it to a whole different level. Included in this screenplay is extra scenes not seen in the final cut of the movie, a scene-by-scene analysis of the film, storyboards of important sequences, character photos, and last but not least, 2 forewords - one by Stephen King and the other by Frank Darabont, both giving insightful comments on the making of the movie and the novella 'Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption'. All in all, this is one of the most worthy purchases i've made as far as screenplays are concerned, and I recommend it to one and all - especially those interested in film analysis and movie making.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?