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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a great girl power story for baseball lovers and others, November 10, 2010
By 
M. Tanenbaum (Claremont, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story (Hardcover)
This new biographical picture book about Effa Manley, the first--and only--woman inducted into the august National Baseball Hall of Fame is a terrific read for kids and adults as well. No, she was not a baseball player herself, rather she was the proud co-owner and manager of the Newark Eagles, a Negro League team, and an advocate for civil rights.

Effa always loved baseball, and after moving to New York loved to see Babe Ruth play for the Yankees. She was also an early civil rights organizer, establishing the Citizens' League for Fair Play in Harlem, to pressure Harlem's largest department store to hire black salesclerks. "Don't Buy Where You Can't Work!," said their picket signs. In 1935, Effa and her husband Abe started a new baseball team, the Eagles, that was part of the new Negro National League that her husband helped to establish. Effa handled the team's business and attended league meetings, despite complaints from other owners that baseball was no place for a woman. Her players called her their "mother hen," and she took care of them, even helping them find off-season jobs.

After Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in major league baseball, the Negro League stated losing fans and top players, and eventually disbanded. But Effa's efforts on behalf of her players didn't end. She feared the Negro Leagues would be forgotten, and began a campaign to convince the National Baseball Hall of Fame to consider the best Negro League Players for membership. Due to her efforts, nine Negro League players were inducted between 1971 and 1977, but not enough according to Effa. She continued to advocate for dozens of Negro League stars until she died in 1981.

Not until 2006 were many of Effa's favorites, including stars from her team, inducted in Cooperstown. That year she, too, was inducted. Author Audrey Vernick writes, "She was recognized for all she did for her players, for her civil rights work, and for getting the major leagues to treat Negro League teams with respect."

This is a terrific book on so many levels; it touches on themes of women's rights and roles, civil rights, baseball history, and so much more. It would be an excellent book for classroom use or for parents to share with their children, particularly those who are baseball fans. The vibrant full-color acrylic illustrations by Don Tate, in a style he calls "in between realistic and cartoony," add immeasurably to the book's visual appeal. A teacher's guide for this outstanding book is available on the author's website. The teacher's guide includes an interview with both the author and the illustrator.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Love This Story (And Baseball), October 26, 2010
This review is from: She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story (Hardcover)
This is the story of Effa Manley the first woman inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.Vernick first introduces us to a young Effa Brooks in first grade. Effa loved playing baseball with her brothers but wasn't allowed because she was a girl and was lighter in skin tone. In 1932 after finishing high school Effa moves from Philadelphia to New York City.

Upset by the unfair treatment of Blacks. Effa gets involved to make a difference. White store owners were refusing to hire Black workers.

"She organized the Citizens League for Fair Play, a group of community leaders. They urged Harlem's largest department store to hire black salesclerks. The owner said no. Nobody believed a group of Black people could change a White bussinessman's mind, but the league fought anyway. For weeks they marched in the street. They convinced their neighbors to shop elsewhere. The store lost money. But still no Black salesclerks. The league kept marching. Finally they won. Newspapers reported the boycotts success."

In 1935 Effa marries Abe Manley. The couple started the Brooklyn Eagles, in the newly formed Negro National League. Effa played a vital roll in the teams sucess, even after they moved to New Jersey in 1936. She always fought for the rights of her players. In 1970, decades after the end of the Negro Leagues, Effa Manley started a letter writing campaign to get some Baseball Hall of Fame to induct some of the best Negro League players.

When I finished this biography, (which I loved, in case that's not obvious) my first thought was why, am I just know hearing about Effa Manley. As much as I love baseball and its history, Effa Manley is someone who I should know. And now I do.

This was a serious trifecta for me. 1. A woman who loved baseball. 2. a woman who refused to be stop because of her gender or race 3. It bridges the gap between the Negro Leagues and Majors.

Two of the players on the Eagles last team were Monte Irvin and Larry Doby. * Vernick also seamlessly includes 1946 Negro League world series between, the Newwark Eagles and the Kansas City Monarchs. Vernick makes the reader feel the excitement of that last game in the series.

Don Tate's colors and style have a very open feel , making them a perfect fit for this story. Tate paid close attention to details from the clothes to the model of the bus the team used. Towards the end there's a close up of Effa Manley that's simply beautiful.

When I read that in 2006 Effa Manley was the first woman ever to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, I got a little choked up. Thanks to Vernick and Tate, they did such a great job telling Effa Manley's stories. This is a must read for baseball fans of all ages.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An all-star story about the first woman inducted into the baseball hall of fame, November 6, 2010
This review is from: She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story (Hardcover)
Want to read an all-star of a story about the first woman inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame? She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story will have you inspired by the courage of one woman who was determined to fight for what was right.

When Effa was in first grade, she was scolded for playing with "those Negroes in the schoolyard." But "those negroes" were Effa's brothers and sisters. While Effa's skin was light, like her mother's, her siblings were dark and Effa was taught that discrimination was just the way things were.

But after high school, Effa moved to New York City and set out to live the big life she dreamed of. Effa enjoyed Yankee's games and met a kind, fun-loving man, Abe Manley who adored baseball. But when Effa went out on the town with Abe in Harlem, she realized that discrimination was still rampant as most businesses were owned by white people.

Effa, determined to change things, organized the Citizen's League for Fair Play, a group of community leaders who urged Harlem's largest department store to hire black salesclerks. Before long, hundreds of black people were working. Just as the business world was changing, so was the world of baseball. Abe and Effa married in 1935 and started a team in the new Negro National League. Effa had never organized schedules or ordered equipment, but Effa ended up handling almost all of the team's business. Most owners protested, stating that baseball was no place for a woman, but Effa persisted, fought for her players and became the first woman ever to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Audrey Vernick, the author of Is Your Buffalo Ready for Kindergarten?, profiles an amazing woman who fought hard for what was right and proved that she loved baseball. Not only will young readers get an introduction to civil rights, Negro Leagues, and women's rights, they'll also be inspired that anyone can create change.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love It!, May 20, 2013
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Great book for teaching biography, social issues and character traits in the common core. Wonderful story for children and adults alike.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Woman's Story for All Children, May 6, 2011
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This review is from: She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story (Hardcover)
Audrey Vernick tells an important story in a straightforward manner accompanied by evocative color illustrations by Don Tate.

Vernick describes Effa Manley's life from her childhood in Philadelphia, where she experienced discrimination at an early age, to her 1935 marriage to Abe Manley, who owned the Newark Eagles, in Newark, New Jersey, to her role as the only woman executive in Negro league baseball during the Eagles' tenure which lasted from 1936 to 1948. Vernick shows how Effa, in her fight to improve conditions for all African Americans, stood up to other team owners - all men, many of whom thought a woman had no place in baseball, to store owners who hired blacks only for menial positions, and to major league baseball executives like Branch Rickey who stole players from her. Effa showed those who had resigned themselves to just accepting life as it was, and who said to each other, "That's just the way things are," that things could be changed for the better with some daring and some effort.

Tate's illustrations set the story's context with full page images of jazz musicians, protesters, ballplayers and the bus they traveled in, Effa in action, fans in the stands, and Effa's plaque in Cooperstown.

Children of all ages will enjoy Vernick's and Tate's book and may well draw some inspiration from it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Racial and Gender Lines Don't Separate Opportunities, June 5, 2014
It's about time women take their rightful place in society, gain the respect they so rightfully deserve among all people. Gender should never hinder the opportunity for success in sports or the marketplace.
And I should know because I live this experience first hand every day of my life. My wife is a successful commercial artist with her own business. My hair stylists is a women. My doctor is a women. And the lists goes on that I could talk about all day.
In this excellent story titled: She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story, Effa shares her love for baseball from the time as a child she judiciously attended baseball games at Yankee Stadium to her successful business endeavor to own a baseball team and become the first ever and only women to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Effa believed in herself, call it confidence, fought for her rights, and let nothing stand in her way. Congratulations Effa. There are no racial or gender lines to prevent people from fulfilling their dreams. Yes! The sky is the limit.
Once again, Audrey Vernick gives the reader (kids) a straightforward biographical story about how to ride above the circumstances. The setting is baseball with an exciting story with lots of lessons to learn. I strongly recommend this book for kids and young adults of all ages and I give it five stars. Marvin P. Ferguson, author of THE UNKNOWN BASEBALL PLAYER.
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5.0 out of 5 stars great book, February 1, 2014
By 
Alyssa Hinds (Antelope, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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It was a new perspective on baseball history, the Negro League history, & one woman's very important role in both.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good, January 5, 2014
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I thought the book was informative for young readers learning about segregation.

I thought the book was good for young readers learning about segregation.
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5.0 out of 5 stars a quiet and inspirational hero, May 23, 2011
This review is from: She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story (Hardcover)
An ennobling biography of a woman who rallied for civil rights. In Harlem where Abe and Effa Manley lived, Effa organized the Citizen's League for Fair Play, where community leaders urged boycotts of establishments that did not hire black workers. They started the Newark Eagles, a team in the new Negro National League. Effa became its business manager. She understood baseball, she understood business, and she cared about people. Times changed, and Negro Leagues lost players to the majors without getting paid. Effa rallied the press for awareness of this unfairness, and a precedent was established to pay for all players from then on. In 1970, her quiet way, Effa petitioned the National Baseball Hall of Fame to induct players from the Negro Leagues. Most were inducted, but it took until 2006; Effa Manley was also inducted, as the first woman! Well-written, and Tate's illustrations are gorgeous.
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She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story
She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story by Audrey Vernick (Hardcover - October 19, 2010)
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