Sherlock Holmes & The Woman In Green 1945 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

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(134) IMDb 6.9/10

Based on Conan Doyle's The Adventure of the Empty House, this "Sherlock Holmes" entry finds Holmes and Dr. Watson trying to solve the case of the "Finger Murders". Several beautiful women have been found murdered, all with their right forefingers severed from their hands.

Starring:
Basil Rathbone, Nigel Bruce
Runtime:
1 hour, 9 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Mystery
Director Roy William Neill
Starring Basil Rathbone, Nigel Bruce
Supporting actors Hillary Brooke, Henry Daniell, Paul Cavanagh, Matthew Boulton, Eve Amber, Frederick Worlock, Coulter Irwin, Sally Shepherd, Mary Gordon, Fred Aldrich, Eve Ashley, Frank Baker, John Burton, Harold De Becker, Leslie Denison, Tony Ellis, Kay Harding, Alec Harford
Studio Reel Enterprises
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 7-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

I love these old Sherlock Holmes movies.
Batterie61
The cast of characters are wonderful and well acted.
C. Denny
Plus, these old movies are very nostalgic.
M. Cooper

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 49 people found the following review helpful By C. Elliott on March 30, 2002
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Although the casting and acting are right on the money (as you'd expect, and usually get from classic Hollywood films), I'm sorry to say that the quality of the video itself is not up to snuff.
The picture is fuzzy, and the soundtrack unclear. This Canadian made video looks as if it was boot-legged in someone's home using amateur equipment.
Before I ordered this title, I kinda thought that three movies on one cassette for such a low price was too good to be true - I was right.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Bobby Underwood VINE VOICE on August 26, 2005
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
This spiffy little entry in the Sherlock Holmes franchise starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, who will forever be Holmes and Watson to moviegoers the world over, has a good cast and story and loads of atmosphere that make it one of the best in the series.

London is being terrorized by a Jack the Ripper type killer preying upon young women; murdering then mutilating them by severing the right forefinger from each victim. Scotland Yard is at a loss to find the killer or prevent the murders from continuing. It is time to call in the one man who may be able to put an end to the terror, Sherlock Holmes.

A chance encounter at Pembroke House where Holmes sees an attractive woman named Lydia (Hillary Brooke) will be the key to what's really behind the slayings, which as Holmes explains to his old pal Watson, may involve something far more sinister than plain old murder. Every Holmes devotee knows only one mind could devise something more sinister than murder, but wasn't Moriarity hanged in Montividio?

This fast paced and exciting entry is a lot of fun for Rathbone and Bruce fans as the two have some fine moments together. The story is full of dark alleys and London fog. The morgue, hypnotism, and a deadly confrontation between Holmes and his long-time "acquaintance," Professor Moriarity, on a dangerously narrow ledge overlooking London, make this one a fine Holmes' tale well-told.

Henry Daniel is the definitive Moriarity and Hillary Brooke adds flavor in this story of blackmail and murder, all tied to hypnotism. Paul Cavanagh is good as Sir George Fenwick, who awakes one morning after a date with Lydia with no memory of where he's been. His only clue is a bloody finger in his pocket and the newsboy's chant outside his window about the latest victim.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By "laddie5" on May 20, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Rathbone and Bruce made 14 Holmes and Watson films; it's a real shame that four of the weakest are in the public domain and keep turning up while the rest are out of print. This one, from late in the series, at least has the virtue of a script by Bertram Millhauser, who wrote the best of them and was most responsible for the distinctive tone of the series: sly humor mixed with slightly horrific mystery. Two of his most memorable creations, the Spider Woman and the Creeper, went on to lives of their own in other Universal horror movies. As for The Woman in Green, it's a blend of Jack the Ripper and Conan Doyle's "The Empty House," with a nice film noir ambience and some clever twists. Unfortunately, the ending is lame and one senses the fact that, after seven years, 10 films, and hundreds of radio broadcasts, Rathbone has begun to weary of playing Holmes. Film trivia note: someone colorized this a few years ago, and didn't even bother to put Hillary Brooke in a green dress. Go figure.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 3, 2004
Format: DVD
While The Woman in Green is not based on any of the stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, it does manage to place Sherlock Holmes in his element, trying to figure out the diabolical plot behind a series of gruesome murders. Scotland Yard, despite investigators' best efforts, is clueless, so Inspector Gregson sucks up his pride and seeks the help of the inhabitant of 221B Baker Street when a fourth young lady falls victim to the gruesome killer. Each of the victims has had her right forefinger removed, and there seems to be nothing else linking the victims. Holmes just so happened to see Sir George Fenwick in the company of a young lady when he first spoke with Gregson. When Fenwick becomes a related victim in the murder spree, Holmes' mental gears begin turning, and he soon comes to believe that none other than Professor Moriarty, his arch nemesis (who was supposedly hanged the previous year) is behind the murders. Blackmail and hypnotism lie at the heart of the plot, and Holmes is determined to bring Moriarty to justice - to succeed, he will have to parry the wiles of a femme fatale (who is certainly no Irene Adler, I must say).

While this story lacks the inner complexity and authentic aura of a Conan Doyle original, it is a satisfying, enjoyable adventure. Basil Rathbone carries the air of Holmes throughout the film, Hillary Brooke makes a formidable female challenger in the form of Lydia Marlowe, and Henry Daniell turns in an impressive performance as Professor Moriarty. I can't help but have mixed feelings about Nigel Bruce's performance as John Watson here. One hates to see Dr. Watson portrayed as such a bumbling old dodder, but at the same time one can't help but be entertained by his comical demeanor in this film.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By AntiochAndy on December 5, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
With all due respect to Jeremy Brett and others who have taken on the role of Sherlock Holmes, Basil Rathbone was simply the best. He seemed to really BE Holmes. He not only looked like the character as Conan Doyle described him, he also had the mannerisms and demeanor cold. What I have never really understood was the decision to have Nigel Bruce play Watson as something of a buffoon. I don't mind a little humor in a story, but Doyle's written tales got on fine without it, and injecting it into these movies added a light touch that, while pleasant, wasn't necessary. And Doyle's Watson was capable of his vulnerabilities and lovable moments without being so foolish.
Rathbone and Bruce made a whole series of Holmes movies together. "The Woman In Green" is not the best of these by any means, but it is not the worst, either. During WW II there was an unfortunate (though understandable) move to bring Holmes forward in time and make a Nazi fighter out of him. That was unfortunate. The best of the series are those that were closest to actual Doyle stories. "The Hound of The Baskervilles", for example.
This one has Holmes out of his milieu, but not fighting Nazis. Hilary Brooke is fine as the mysterious and seductive "woman in green" and the fingers missing from the series of victims add to the suspense, but there is never much mystery as to who the killers are. The real issue is how Holmes will succeed against them.
As a Holmes story, this is only mediocre. There is suspense, but not much mystery, and Holmes is out of his proper context. Rathbone's portrayal of Holmes gets it four stars. If you're into Sherlock Holmes, or you just like vintage suspense movies, "The Woman In Green" is fun. Add it to your collection, but only if you've got "Hound Of The Baskervilles" already.
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