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Sherlock Holmes Vol. 1: A Study in Scarlet Hardcover – November 10, 2009


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Product Details

  • Series: Sherlock Holmes
  • Hardcover: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Idea & Design Works Llc; Reprint edition (November 10, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1600105521
  • ISBN-13: 978-1600105524
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (492 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #518,478 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Arthur Conan Doyle's Study in Scarlet is the first published story involving the legendary Sherlock Holmes, arguably the world's best-known detective, and the first narrative by Holmes's Boswell, the unassuming Dr. Watson, a military surgeon lately returned from the Afghan War. Watson needs a flat-mate and a diversion. Holmes needs a foil. And thus a great literary collaboration begins.

Watson and Holmes move to a now-famous address, 221B Baker Street, where Watson is introduced to Holmes's eccentricities as well as his uncanny ability to deduce information about his fellow beings. Somewhat shaken by Holmes's egotism, Watson is nonetheless dazzled by his seemingly magical ability to provide detailed information about a man glimpsed once under the streetlamp across the road.

Then murder. Facing a deserted house, a twisted corpse with no wounds, a mysterious phrase drawn in blood on the wall, and the buffoons of Scotland Yard--Lestrade and Gregson--Holmes measures, observes, picks up a pinch of this and a pinch of that, and generally baffles his faithful Watson. Later, Holmes explains: "In solving a problem of this sort, the grand thing is to be able to reason backward.... There are few people who, if you told them a result, would be able to evolve from their own inner consciousness what the steps were which led up to that result." Holmes is in that elite group.

Conan Doyle quickly learned that it was Holmes's deductions that were of most interest to his readers. The lengthy flashback, while a convention of popular fiction, simply distracted from readers' real focus. It is when Holmes and Watson gather before the coal fire and Holmes sums up the deductions that led him to the successful apprehension of the criminal that we are most captivated. Subsequent Holmes stories--The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, and The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes--rightly plunge the twosome directly into the middle of a baffling crime, piling mystery upon mystery until Holmes's denouement once more leaves the dazzled Watson murmuring, "You are wonderful, Holmes!" Generations of readers agree. --Barbara Schlieper --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 7-12-In the first of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Dr. Watson, discharged from military service after suffering wounds, is at loose ends until a chance encounter leads him to take rooms with Sherlock Holmes. When Watson is drawn into the investigation of a bizarre murder in which Holmes is involved, he is unaware that it is the beginning of the most famous partnership in the history of criminal detection.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Conan Doyle's Hound of the Baskervilles is the best known Sherlock Holmes story.
David James Trapp
I liked this book because of the characters, how the story developed, and how it was written.
Jim Lyons
In conclusion, this is a very good mystery story that keeps you turning the pages.
Joseph J. Truncale

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 64 people found the following review helpful By C. Gonzalez on February 28, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I concur with previous reviews. Unacceptable copy as it is mising passages - as mentioned before - which creates the most confusion from the very start. Should be removed from the Amazon catalog as it is unbecoming of this vendor. SAVE YOUR TIME. DO NOT DOWNLOAD IT.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Deborah Teitelbaum on December 25, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a classic mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Unfortunately, this free version lacks several sections vital to solving the mystery. I have only read a couple chapters and have already found that the legend of the Baskervilles, the account of the death of Sir Charles Baskerville and a letter to Sir Henry Baskerville are missing. These omissions render this version useless, and force me to delete it from my library.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Matthew French on August 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
When I began the book, I thought it would be slow going because it was written about 100 years ago. I was SO wrong! I finished the book in a period of less than 24 hours!!! This is an absolutely fabulous book! Doyle's use of language is masterful, and you are swept away to the moor with its swamps, jagged cliffs, and massive hills. I can honestly say I was quite spooked as I was reading some of it at night!

Since this is the first novel I have ever read by Doyle, I didn't know what to expect. But the twists in the plot and the constant itching to know what was going to happen next had me hooked!

I watched the 1959 movie after reading this, and I have to say it was a disgrace. I don't know if I would be happy seeing any of the versions, only because I don't know if any of them could even compare to the rich world and language used by Doyle to transport you to Devonshire!! But of course, the book is always better than the movie. :)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By emilio izquierdo on November 13, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
How might anybody read a whole novel text centered? It is really annoying I wouldn't have ever purchased it if i had known. I strongly recommend not to make the same mistake.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Danielle G. on December 9, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As mentioned by the previous reviewer, this version is missing quite a bit of key content. Whether it's a formatting issue with the Kindle or the transcriber forgot to include the passages is unclear. But the story is unreadable without the missing text.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Godly Gadfly on April 26, 2002
Format: Paperback
A Study in Scarlet is a good detective story, but certainly not Doyle�s greatest. But it bears the distinction of being the novel which introduced the world to the legendary Sherlock Holmes. First appearing in 1887, it was not to be the greatest story about Sherlock Holmes, but it was the first. Doyle first introduces us to John H. Watson, a medical doctor recovering from duty in Afghanistan. Watson needs a room-mate, and a mutual acquaintance introduces both him and us to Holmes. So we come to know both Holmes, Watson, and the memorable 221B Baker Street.
Watson�s first impressions of Holmes are merely that he is a man enshrouded in mystery and eccentricity, and Watson politely restrains his curiosity by avoiding asking too many intrusive questions, despite the parade of strange individuals that come to their apartment to consult Holmes, and despite his bemusement at Holmes� passion for playing the violin and his egotism. Watson�s perplexation at Holmes� character and profession is slowly unravelled in the second chapter which Doyle appropriately titles �The Science of Deduction�. Watson observes that �his zeal for certain studies was remarkable, and within eccentric limits his knowledge was so extraordinarily ample and minute that his observations have fairly astounded me �His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge. Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing � That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to me to be such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it.�(p11). Holmes apparently is brilliant at identifying a stain on your trousers, but completely ignorant about the most elementary contemporary political events.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Inspector Gadget on November 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
I seriously raced thru this book as it was highly addictive. Holmes is brilliantly introduced to us and to Watson. Once Holmes lets a room out in his house to Watson the intrique starts. Doc is suspicous of what Holmes does and is keen to join him on his cases. When a man is found dead in a seedy house in suburban London the mystery kicks in.
Holmes uses his awesome methods of deduction to bring the killer straight into his hands. But then the story takes an unexpected and mostly inappropriate turn. We go back a few decades to the Salt Flats of Utah and follow the story of 2 lost travellers and how they are saved by fachist Mormons. It's all to unfamiliar and un-Holmes and I was glad to get it over with and back to Holmes mysteries and case-solving.
I guess that Conan-Doyle never knew where the character of Holmes would go after this. The short stories and novels that followed were much better and developed some of the minors characters. But every "franchise" has to start somewhere. I assume Conan-Doyle never imagined that Holmes would have lasted so long and parodied and imitated to much, even to this day. But this is where it all started. And it got better and better from here on.
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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 19, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Baskerville family had a myth that haunted them for ages. When it finally comes true, Mr. Sherlock Holmes must come to the rescue. The Baskerville myth of a dog that kills all descendants of the Baskervilles at night on the moor has haunted the family for ages. So, when Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead on the moor, everyone assumes it was the hound. Sir Henry, who is Sir Charles' nephew, comes and inherits the estate with Holmes closely watching. Sir Henry meets the Stapletons, a young couple that are his closest neighbors, and begins to fall in love with Ms. Stapleton. Holmes puts Sir Henry's life at stake at the end of the book, and they catch the culprit in the act. This book is an excellent read that would be the perfect story to read when you can't decide between a mystery and an adventure.

This book is an example of how much Sherlock Holmes cares about other people's feelings. When Holmes sent Watson with Sir Henry to inherit the estate , he didn't tell Watson that he would follow to make sure everything was OK, which made Watson feel betrayed and not trusted. Holmes also told Watson that Cartwright had supplied all of his needs for him, which made Watson even more upset. At the end of this story, Holmes puts Sir Henry's life on the line when he lets the hound jump on Sir Henry before he kills it, petrifying Sir Henry with fear.

The antagonist is really good at disguising himself in this book. He outsmarts Sherlock Holmes in London with a full black beard, and calling himself Sherlock Homes. The Antagonist also befriends the Baskervilles so that they would never suspect him as the culprit. His plans are very smart, from bribing Sir Charles out of his house to attempting to kill Sir Henry the way back from a friendly dinner.
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