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4.8 out of 5 stars
Shikar
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
My copy of Shikar arrived a few days ago and I planned to spend the weekend reading it. I was wrong. I read it straight through. I don't know if Jack Warner has another novel in him, but he already has accomplished more with this one than most who make their living at it.
I only hope Hollywood doesn't ruin it when they make the movie, which I find inconceivable will not be made. Especially since it would seem to be the right role at the right time for Sean Connery as Jim Graham.
One can only suppose it was all those years writing with such skill about reality that enabled him to craft a novel with as much horror as any Stephen King could write, along with a full spectrum of humanity's various specimens, without taking the easy route of creating either monsters or caricatures. Both people and tiger are astoundingly real.
This is not "Jaws" in the Georgia woods. It is the intriguing tale of both animal and man, out of their elements yet still driven to do what they do naturally. Warner's tiger is not some mindless evil, but an almost sympathetic character in his own right. Almost, because you can never break away from what he is doing, must do, to survive.
Here's hoping Shikar becomes the runaway bestseller of the summer, as it should. Then I can tell people it was written by the man who, by example during our years together in United Press International's Atlanta newscenter, taught me far more than I ever learned.
Helluva job.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
When I read this book, I couldn't put it down. When I was able to break away, I spent the whole time thinking about the story and characters. It made me afraid to go hiking in the woods behind my house! Well written, action-filled, great story. I want more! I'm calling friends and recommending it - something I rarely do, but this book is worth it. If you want an exciting book to read, this is it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on July 5, 2003
Format: Hardcover
On my own, I never would have read this book. However, my husband insisted, and I'm glad he did. To my surprise, I loved it. Hard to put down, which I haven't experienced in years with a book. Highly recommended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on August 15, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Take a look at the colorful cover of Jack Warner's debut novel Shikar on a display rack and you'd think it's a rip-snortin' yarn about a manhunt for a man-eating tiger. And it is. But it's also about considerably more, which puts it several cuts above the usual high-testosterone male adventure novel.
At the heart of the tornado of a tiger hunt Warner has created is a quiet Garden-of-Eden tale of innocence vs. evil centered around a nearly feral mountain boy. To miss this, or skip over it to hurry up the hunt, would be to miss the point entirely.
Warner's ability to so artfully balance these two elements, the quiet and the storm, make him an interesting writer whose next book I will eagerly await.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on August 26, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I'm not much for thrillers usually, and like many women, I'm squeamish about my gore, so why did I read Shikar? A friend recommended it. Rightly so, it turned out. While the prerequisite number of folks did show up dead, I didn't want to stop reading as I met the tiger, a young, half-feral boy, and an old hunter from India's long-gone British Rha, who enlists to kill the man-eating tiger. The writing is pure mind honey, and in an extra bonus, the story's got more tiger lore than any animal-eat-animal nature show I've ever seen. Warner's come up with something new: The literary thriller. Let's hope others follow suit.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 13, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Finished Shikar in three gulps- the last going till three one morning. I loved it; but then I am a recently retired policeman, have had a lot of professional and personal contact with reporters, know many real Georgia sheriff's and lastly I appreciate the awesome raw power of wild animals. We have lost our respect for animals through Disney, zoos and the Discovery Channel, but Warner was able to capture what happens when a wild animal gets loose among us.
In my career as a cop I encountered several smart and resilient but troubled children from dysfunctional families and was always amazed at their survival skills and intellect given their home lives. Warner has obviously encountered such a child too, and used his experience to create one of the the main characters.
I hope to get Shikar signed when Mr. Warner comes to my local book store (Chapter 11) in Atlanta next week, then put it away for a re-read this November when hiking the foothills of the Appalachian mountains.

Jack Warner has hit his target, and I thank him for creating a thoughtful and gripping tale.

LA
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 27, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Not only has Warner written a suspenseful, hair-raising page turner, he has successfully captured North Georgia mountain life. His characters are real and therefore believable; his scenery is accurate and stunning. No hillbilly stereotypes mar this beautiful work.
I strongly recommend this book to readers who enjoy a good story, to those who savor well-honed characters and to anyone who appreciates a nicely turned phrase. I am looking forward to Warner's next book.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 26, 2003
Format: Hardcover
There are few people in all the world whose writing abilities hold me in absolute awe. John G. (Jack) Warner is one of them.
Warner is responsible for some of the finest news stories I ever wrote when I worked for United Press International, lo these many years ago. UPI journalism worked like this: when you were off on a big, big story, you telephoned your information to a central bureau and the actual writing was done by a "desker" - a true craftsman who hardly ever got his byline on the story, but made it what it was. Some of the things I "wrote" were so great they were beyond belief. Jack Warner wrote them.
So, it was with a great deal of anticipation that I opened the cover of Shikar, Jack's fictional debut. Retired from UPI and the Atlanta Journal, Mr. Warner is decidedly not retired from the craft of writing. This is an outstanding novel.
Warner's story is of a man-eating Bengal tiger who escapes from a zoo in rural Georgia and does what a man-eating tiger is apt to do - enjoys some of the local for lunch. Amid a media frenzy, the town imports a game hunter to slay the beast.
We're treated not only to a page-turner, as they say in the reviews, but a fast-paced and wholly interesting story which is also filled with both respect for nature and a healthy dose of tiger lore. If you like thrillers with something extra - and are a bit tired of the chase-across-the-world-by Nazis formula books - here is a refreshing and engrossing tale told by a master of the written word.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 26, 2003
Format: Hardcover
There are few people in all the world whose writing abilities hold me in absolute awe. John G. (Jack) Warner is one of them.
Warner is responsible for some of the finest news stories I ever wrote when I worked for United Press International, lo these many years ago. UPI journalism worked like this: when you were off on a big, big story, you telephoned your information to a central bureau and the actual writing was done by a "desker" - a true craftsman who hardly ever got his byline on the story, but made it what it was. Some of the things I "wrote" were so great they were beyond belief. Jack Warner wrote them.
So, it was with a great deal of anticipation that I opened the cover of Shikar, Jack's fictional debut. Retired from UPI and the Atlanta Journal, Mr. Warner is decidedly not retired from the craft of writing. This is an outstanding novel.
Warner's story is of a man-eating Bengal tiger who escapes from a zoo in rural Georgia and does what a man-eating tiger is apt to do - enjoys some of the local for lunch. Amid a media frenzy, the town imports a game hunter to slay the beast.
We're treated not only to a page-turner, as they say in the reviews, but a fast-paced and wholly interesting story which is also filled with both respect for nature and a healthy dose of tiger lore. If you like thrillers with something extra - and are a bit tired of the chase-across-the-world-by Nazis formula books - here is a refreshing and engrossing tale told by a master of the written word.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 26, 2004
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Jack Warner is a master storyteller.
I've been privileged to enjoy Warner's work for more than 20 years, from his days as a wire-service deskman to newspaper reporter to his station in life now as a novelist. He is one of the finest writers I've encountered. He doesn't waste words or mince them; he can tell you more in two sentences than most writers can in 20. His writing is elegant and illuminating and never flabby. He is effusively efficient.
After only a few pages of "Shikar" you will feel the man-eating tiger's yellow, glowing eyes stalking you. You will also feel a strong reluctance to put the book down. You might also never look at a walk in the woods the same way again.
This is a heart-stopping thriller but also a sweet story about a noble old man and an innocent young boy with more in common than one might imagine. These are characters with hearts and souls.
My wish is that Jack Warner writes faster. I can't wait for his next book.
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