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The Ship Avenged (Brainship) Mass Market Paperback – January 1, 1998


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Product Details

  • Series: Brainship
  • Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Baen; 1ST edition (January 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671878611
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671878610
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #567,263 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

Another entry in the Brain/Brawn series created by Anne McCaffrey, and a direct sequel to the paperback The City Who Fought (McCaffrey and Stirling); ``brains'' are humans wired directly and immovably into their spaceships, ``brawns'' their mobil human partners. Planet Bethel bigwig Amos ben Sierra Nueva and his daughter Soamosa are kidnapped by the evil mutant, Belazair of Kolnar, in revenge for a previous defeat; Belazair plans to infect Amos with a contagious brain-destroying virus and then send him back to Bethel. So, after some arm-twisting by secret agent Bros Sperin, spaceship Wyal (brain: Rand; brawn: Joat Simeon-Hap) speeds to the rescue, though Joat and Rand don't yet know about the virus. But then Belazair's kindly son, Karak, refuses to torture Soamosa; instead he falls in love and escapes with her. Joat, meanwhile, discovers that one of Belazair's key associates is the drug-ruined uncle who, when she was a small girl, sold her into slavery in settlement of a gambling debt. Not to worry, though: In McCaffrey universes, the good guys always win in the end. Pretty good ersatz McCaffrey, despite the feebly unconvincing love story. -- Copyright ©1996, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"... Stirling proves that the space-opera appeal of the Ship books continues.... Clever technological toys, cute Al programs and really nasty biochemical poisons abound..".

-- Publishers Weekly


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Customer Reviews

Not too female.
Joe
The end of the book is riddled with plotholes and dangling plot lines that the author tried to tie up neatly at the end, but just...didn't.
Kenvee B
Bad endings are bad.
L. Magee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Kenvee B on April 3, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I really enjoyed "The City Who Fought", especially the character of Joat, so I was thrilled when I finally found out there was a sequel. Well...it was all right. Not bad, not great, certainly not what it could have been. All the right moves were made in the beginning to set up a truly fascinating read, but it just never came together. The end of the book is riddled with plotholes and dangling plot lines that the author tried to tie up neatly at the end, but just...didn't. It wasn't just that the romance felt horribly contrived, but ALL the character relationships towards the end started feeling like actors reading lines that didn't quite add up. And unfortunately, some of the most important action of all was glossed over by an "overview" last chapter that left me screaming. The book would've benefitted from an extra fifty pages or so to tie up all the complications that were brought in at the last minute.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Tristan Lawrence on November 20, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book just isn't up to the standard of the other episodes in the BrainShip series. The plot and the characters show promise, but the polish and fun of the other books is missing. The main villian is absolutely flat and serves mainly as a blatent plot device. The various logic inconsistancies pile up until the plot collapses totally about 75% of the way into the story. I also noticed a large number of editing errors. "ass" instead of "ask", "hum" instead of "him", and so forth. Not recommended for anybody but a die-hard fan.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 1, 1997
Format: Hardcover
You gotta read the brainship series. They are all entertaining. Stirling tones down the
evil mutants and shows the potential for some reconciliation. Still some nasty folks to
contend with but off set by a new alien and a likable AI. Joat could be a good focus point
for some entertaining tales digressing from the brainships. Her confrontation with her personal devil is skewed enough to be reasonable. No skull sweat but
recreational reading doesn't have to be demanding, read it if you read the rest, you'll be
sorry if you miss it.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Chrijeff VINE VOICE on January 10, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In this authorized sequel to McCaffrey & Stirling's "The City Who Fought," it's 10 years since the barbarian spacegoing raiders the Kolnari captured Space Station SSS-900-C and were sent scurrying with tails between legs by Simeon, the Brain that runs it, and Joat, the 11-year-old technodemon who lurked in its conduits. In gratitude, Simeon and his Brawn, Stationmaster Channa Hap, adopted Joat and saw that she received an education. Now Joat is out on her own, a dropout from Brawn school with a small ship called "WYAL" (for While You Ain't Lookin') and her very own AI, Rand, who, while not a Brain, functions almost as well as one.

Unfortunately the Kolnari have neither forgotten nor forgiven their defeat, and their warlord, Belazir t'Marid, has succeeded in acquiring a virus that attacks the cognitive centers of the brain and, in effect, brings on a kind of artificial Alzheimer's Disease. To spread it, he must create a human carrier, then return that carrier to his own planet and wait for the virus to do its work. The carrier he selects is Amos bin Sierra Nueva, Prophet and leader of the religiously-oriented colony world of Bethel, which played a major role in the Kolnari defeat a decade before. So that Amos can't warn his people of his state, Belazir injects him with a paralyzing agent and advertises, through his underground contacts, for a free ship to carry his "package" home. The "WYAL"--which, unknown to Belazir, has been hired by Central Worlds master spy Bros Sperin to look into the man Belazir uses as a contact and fence--responds, and in short order the fate of Bethel, Station Simeon, and much of the civilized Galaxy hangs on Joat, Rand, Sperin, a Sondee scientist named Seg !T'sel, Joat's one crewmember Alvec, and Amos's close friend and head of security, Joseph.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Pauline on May 23, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is NOT a brain ship story.
If you like McCaffrey, you'll read and like it well enough. However, when I first read it, I thought it was a CHEAT.
All the previous brainships were human minds and the stories related to the ship as protagonist. This ship is simply an artificial intelligence used to fake a brain brawn story with Joat, a character introduced in an earlier book.
Joat is the main character and the story is ok, but I'd have liked it better if this had been about some way of getting Joat into a real brain/brawn relationship in spite of impossible odds.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 4, 1997
Format: Hardcover
I am a diehard Stirling fan, and this is the weakest of his books. "The City who Fought" was wonderful, and this is just uninspired. I conjecture that working out of his own universe took its toll. Go back and read any of his other books, and give this one a miss. Even Joat is toned down. When she confronts her Uncle, all she does is punch him in the nose!!. Not the old rip their eyes out Joat we knew and loved in "City who Fought"
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lia on February 2, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I really liked 'The City who fought', so I was thrilled to find this sequel. However, despite meeting the likeable characters from the first book again, this one was a disappointment. It started well enough, but the end fell through completely. I felt cheated and even went back to see if I'd got a faulty copy with pages missing!

The tension builds up, the characters are all in trouble, separated and discovered by the enemy and the next thing is that the heroine wakes up and all the action is OVER! A few loose ends are wrapped up (including the less than believable romance), but a lot more are left dangling. Maybe the author is planning a third book to the series, but I for sure won't pick that up.
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