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44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
on April 22, 2005
This set is wonderful but, a few things have changed since this set was first announced. it was to be a 2 disc set and the 2 films were to be the colorized versions. What this set has is just 1 DVD and so both movies are on 1 disc and in black and white. The back of the DVD case shows the colorized photos which makes you think the films are the color versions. The menus also show colorized photos. The VHS versions which are in color looked very good but for some reason Universal decided to not include them.

The real prize of this DVD is the extra, which is Shirley's very first movie and which has NEVER before been available on VHS or DVD or 16MM or any other format. "THE RUNT PAGE".Shirley is not shown much at all during the 10 minutes this film runs. She is shown right after the opening credits and then again during the last 3 minutes. She is very adorable here and, for this first film short, she is wearing only shorts, she would be covered up more in her next 7 berlesk film shorts.

In this film short, she is aware of the camera and theres a few times where she is looking at it. She is so very adorable in her scenes and its amazing that at this time she was 3 years old!

You will really enjoy this film short as well as the 2 movies which are in super quality!

ENJOY!
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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful
I cringed when I realized that these Paramount gems had been rereleased by Universal, but I needn't have worried. Contrary to the review previous to this one, the prints look and sound quite good, even--incredibly--The Runt Page, which is the oldest feature on the disk. The captions are, for once, quite accurate, and I believe there are some other language options as well.
On the downside, the only insert is an ad for other titles in the series--no hard-copy chapter list. It also seems to me that perhaps commentary by Mrs. Black (Temple's married moniker) might have added value to the package.
If you're not familiar with Shirley Temple, be warned: you're about to witness a full-fledged phenomenon. Shirley Temple is one of the most remarkable women ever born, and is certainly the greatest child star of all time. Sadly, she--despite her subsequent political achievments--is virtually never cited for her considerable accomplishments by advocates of women's groups, presumably because her political beliefs are "incorrect." My response to this (and to them) is "phooey." Her husband was once quoted as saying that he believes his wife "is some kind of deity"; watch her do her stuff and decide for yourself.
Now, isn't it about time for Fox to do right by the little dynamo who single-handedly took them out of the red during the Great Depression?
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
This DVD collects two of Shirley Temple's earliest movies and her very first short in one pack. The movies are "Little Miss Marker" and "Now and Forever." The short is "The Runt Page." Fans of Shirley Temple will want these early films for their collection.

"The Runt Page"

Shirley Temple has a minor role in this ten minute short. She is rarely seen and has no speaking part. Actually, none of the child actors has a speaking part as adults voiced all parts. This short is a satire of "The Front Page," which was released the year before, and features a host of small children dressed in diapers acting a short vignette based on that movie. The short is fair, and by itself would probably rate only three stars. The material is dated, the sound is poor, and I found the short somewhat tedious to watch.

"Little Miss Marker"

I have seen many, and perhaps most, of Shirley Temple's later movies. Those movies feature Shirley in various states of peril. However, I was unprepared for Shirley being a marker for a bet. Though I was initially appalled that any father could use a child as a marker, the movie was actually quite well done and the only character who failed to come away improved from their contact with Shirley was Shirley's father.

Marthy "Marky" Jane (Temple) is left by her father (Edward Earle, in an uncredited role) as a marker for a bet. We do not see Marky's father again, but we learn that he lost his bet and committed suicide. We wonder what will become of Shirley, but, never fear, Shirley charms even the meanest of hoodlums. The ending provides redemption for the worst of the crowd, and foreshadows even more poignant (or maudlin, depending on your point of view) future Shirley Temple roles.

In addition to Temple, the standout actor in this film is Adolphe Menjou as Sorrowful Jones. Dorothy Dell was also quite good as a singer and marginal woman of ill repute Bangles Carson. Unfortunately, Dell's career would be cut short soon after this film when she was killed in a car accident.

The picture quality of this film is quite good and the sound is fair. I thought both were acceptable considering the age of the movie and the likely quality of the original prints. Improvements in both may be possible with newer technology, but complaints of either the picture or sound in this version are, in my opinion, unwarranted.

If you can get past the initial concept of a father betting his daughter on a horse race, fans of Shirley Temple will enjoy this cute film.

"Now and Forever"

This movie is even stranger than the previous movie. Gary Cooper plays a swindler(!), which seems strange given that he was already a star and had appeared in more than 50 movies. I found it hard to accept Gary Cooper as a crook, even if he found redemption, as most co-stars did, with Shirley Temple.

Jerry Day (Cooper) is offered the opportunity to allow his brother-in-law to raise the daughter he has not seen in years, Penelope "Penny" Day (Temple). Penny's mother died soon after Penny was born and Jerry headed out to make his living my stealing. Initially Jerry sees this offer as an opportunity to get a lot of money for a child he cares nothing about. However, after meeting Penny, Jerry is charmed and decides he wants to raise her after all.

Love interest Toni Carstairs (Carole Lombard) wants to settle down in one place and wants to stop Jerry's swindling, but does not think Jerry can do it. Jerry tries hard to quit, but discovers that working at a real job does not pay enough for Penny's private school. Jerry works one last job with jewel thief Felix Evans (Guy Standing), but soon regrets what he did, courtesy of his personal conscience Penny.

The end of this movie is similar to many others with Shirley Temple. Everyone is redeemed except for one person, and though the messy details are left off camera, the ending is happy.

As with "Little Miss Marker," the quality of this film is good. The sound is probably better in this film than the previous film. I found both to be quite acceptable for a film of this era. My biggest struggle was with Gary Cooper in the role of a crook. Cooper really did not pull of this role very well. Further, Carole Lombard was too nagging as Toni Carstairs. The only person walking away from this film with their reputation intact was Shirley Temple, who was incredibly cute and the scene stealer throughout. Actually, there was one other standout performance, and that was Charlotte Granville as Mrs. J.H.P. Crane. I will leave a viewer to discover why I thought her performance was very good or even excellent.

Shirley Temple was well on her way to becoming a phenomenon when she made this movie. She rolls over Cooper and Lombard, both of whom were billed ahead of her, and becomes the real star of this movie. Fans of Temple will absolutely need this movie for their collection. Enjoy!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on September 23, 2005
This is a great opportunity to see rare Shirley Temple in pristine form. The Runt Page is Shirley's first movie with the Baby Burlesque group. Although her part is small, it is great to see her so young - Age 4. She was so cute even then. Now and Forever has a young Shirley starring with the great actress Carole Lombard. I am a big Shirley fan, but I have never seen this movie before.
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32 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on June 7, 2005
First off, this "set" only contains two full movies. That alone makes this far less of a value than Universal's many other "Franchise Collections", such as those for Abbott & Costello, "Ma and Pa Kettle", and "Francis the Talking Mule".

Secondly, the transfers are very substandard. No effort whatsoever has been made to clean up these films, and the result is a transfer equivalent to a Madacy release.

Definitely not one of Universal's better values.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 19, 2012
These are great films (some of my favorites) of shirley temple. It's easy to see in them how talented she was so young. Unfortunately the quality of this DVD just isn't up to today's standards. I expect if someone releases a film on DVD that it look better than the VHS copy I already own. Not the case here, film grain, dust, poor overall quality - not worth the money.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
LITTLE MISS MARKER:
This is one of those movies you couldn't make today, that's for sure. A gambler leaves his adorable little girl (Shirley Temple) with a bookie as a "marker" until he can go home and get the $20 he wants to bet. But he committed suicide instead, probably because he heard the race he wanted to bet on over the radio and knew he had lost. Sorrowful Jones, the bookie, thus has custody of the kid, who tells him her mommy "got awful tired and went away," by which we are to understand she died.

So Sorrowful Jones takes her back to his apartment, and there is this cute little scene where she says she can't sleep in her underwear, and so Jones takes it off for her. Imagine making a scene like that today! She also jumps into his bed as he is preparing a bed for her out of two chairs, which is something the PC censors would never accept, either. And then there is the fact that when his friend Bubbles, the night-club singer, reads about the suicide of Markie's father in the newspaper, they do not instantly turn her over to the police. In fact, a policeman comes around looking for her, since they found Jones' betting ticket in the suicide's pocket, and Jones lies about having seen the kid.

There's a lot of cuteness here, but like I say, very little that would be done these days. Also, frankly, if you subtract the cutest little kid anyone had seen in many a year, the actual story is very poorly written, the actors pretty hammy, and lots of stereotypes are perpetuated that would not be acceptable today. It did enjoy the scene where all these tough mugs dress up like King Arthur's knights of the round table, though.

It's hard to assign stars to something like this, but I'll give it one for Shirley Temple herself, and one for the rest of the cast combined.

NOW AND FOREVER:
This is one I had not seen on TV when I was a kid, the way I did with "Little Miss Marker." I think I know why. Too much sympathy for criminals. Well, the gamblers in "Marker" were criminals, too, but it wasn't quite so obvious.

Strange that Shirley Temple did so many movies with disreputable characters, isn't it?

Gary Cooper plays her father, Carole Lombard is her step-mother. When the story opens, they are in China, swindling the hotel they've been staying in for three weeks out of the $805 they owe. (Yes, three weeks in a luxury hotel for $805. This was 1934, after all.) Cooper gets a letter from his brother-in-law, who has custody of his daughter ever since her mother (the old crab's sister) died. And of course he is an old crab. Cooper is determined to sell Shirley to him for $75,000, but when he gets to know her, she charms him so much he refuses to sell her, and instead takes her away with him. They go back to Paris, where Lombard is waiting for him. She didn't know he'd be bringing the kid along, but she had disapproved of selling her to the uncle.

It happens that one of Cooper's swindles was on a man who was himself a swindler, and a jewel thief, and gets Cooper involved in his schemes because of having to pay some $2,000 for Shirley's posh school. These people have gotten used to living far above their means, you know.

Cooper ends up in bed with a bullet wound, Shirley has been handed over to a rich lady who was as charmed by her as everyone always was, and there are gendarmes in Cooper's sick room ready to take him away. This story is perhaps a little better than "Little Miss Marker," and it does have Gary Cooper, looking as charming as he was able to look when he was young, but Lombard looks like she's been wearing out. I don't think it was the makeup.

Two stars, one for Cooper and one for Shirley.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 3, 2014
I have found colorized versions of Little Miss Marker (free) on You Tube. I kinda wish the one in this little-d-pack had been colorized. Otherwise, I'm quite happy with it, and wonder if you all know where I can find some more of her movies from the time when she was in her teens and getting older...Like, I've found Kiss and Tell, A Kiss for Corliss, Miss Annie Rooney, and I'll Be Seeing You, but can't find Kathleen, Since You Went Away, The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer, Honeymoon, Fort Apache, Adventure in Buffalo. Some I can find on Netflix, but the ones I can find on You Tube FREE are a blessing!
Also I wish I could find Poor Little Rich Girl, not just clips of it, and colorized would be even better. I love her and all her movies. They put me in such a good mood.
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on February 10, 2015
The Shirley Temple Darling Pack contains two early Temple features and one short.Little Miss Marker,Now and Forever and Runt Page.These films show Temple on the cusp of superstardom,and as such are integral to understanding where she had been before she was to become what she became.
Little Miss Marker(released June/34)stars,among others,Shirley Temple,Adolphe Menjou and Dorothy Dell.The story finds Shirley as the daughter of a man who leaves her behind as collateral/a marker to cover a $20 bet on a horse race.The father ends up committing suicide and Menjou, who runs the betting shop,ends up having to raise her.Between Shirley and Dell,the previously stoic Menjou ends up falling for both dolls and has a happy ending for all.The film overall is a pleasant diversion and Temple was quickly developing into quite the little actress.In a short time she would be box office gold for Fox.This was a loan out to Paramount by Fox ,who up to this point had also been under-utilizing her.When the box office returns came in Paramount offered Fox a cool $50 grand for her contract.Fox declined,much to their later delight.3 1/2 stars.
Now and Forever(released Aug/34)stars,among others,Gary Cooper and Carole Lombard.Cooper plays a wandering playboy who is always short on dough.His moll is Lombard who travels wherever Cooper goes.As the film opens they are in Shanghai and broke,with a big hotel bill to pay.Cooper poses as an accountant and re-adjusts the books/their bill.Cooper gets a letter about his daughter,something he tells Lombard about for the first time.It seems his ex father in law wants custody and Cooper will let him have her for $75 grand.As it washes out,Cooper ends up taking his girl with him instead.They go to France where Cooper ends up again out of money and desperate. He ends up stealing jewelry and hawking it.But due to his little girl's influence he has a change of heart and tries to retrieve the bangle.He ends up shooting the fence and getting shot also.Just before this he had arranged for a kindly rich dowager to take custody of Shirley.Now wounded he says his goodbyes to her and ends up fainting in pain.He recovers and he,Carole and Shirley become a proper family.This is a very cynical film and Cooper plays a nasty,very selfish part.Lombard loves him but many times has second thoughts on their lifestyle and his seemingly cavalier attitude towards his daughter.The plot,to me,doesn't play as smoothly as Little Miss Marker and tends to drag too much.2 1/2-3 stars.
The last film is a one reeler.It was part of the Baby Burlesk series of films;kind of Our Gang rip offs(they weren't the only ones doing it).There were almost a dozen shot,all self contained films.The is the first one shot and a terrible stinker and waste of celluloid.It is a send up of the film The Front Page.The kids just mouth their lines,but all are over dubbed by adults.It's trying to make kids look and act like adults,but fails miserably.The only value is that it contains Temple's very first screen appearance...and that's it brother! 1 star.
Technically speaking all films are in very good condition and are in a 1:33:1 a/r.There is only one one-sided DVD here.
All in all this is a must have for Shirley Temple fans.This showcases the worst and best of some of Shirley's early 30s work.The two films showcase her obvious talents, just as she was on the cusp of stardom.None of the films come up to a 4 star rating,but as a significant part of the Temple legacy,it is a must have and I am glad it is available.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 7, 2010
This was purchased to add to our collection of Shirley Temple movies. It did not disappoint. The movie was sent promptly and in new condition.
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