Shofarot Verses

May 27, 2014 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 27, 2014
  • Label: Tzadik
  • Copyright: (C) 2014 Tzadik
  • Total Length: 49:09
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00K8K7I84
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #228,578 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Susan Frances on July 21, 2014
Format: MP3 Music
A compilation of well-formed narratives, Shofarot Verses from saxophonist Paul Shapiro converses with a bard’s instinct. His performance shows command of the sax, and his ability to share the spotlight with his fellow musicians whips up a tight rapport between them. Immensely proud of his Jewish heritage, Shapiro’s music wafts of party-imbued klezmer harnessing a gypsy flare fringed in the soulful properties of swinging bop. His recording is a vessel for modern jazz with an ethnic glimmer, drifting from such pensive odes to his Hasidic lineage as “Hashivenu” to the jubilant suite “Surfin’ Salami.” The melodic transitions are seamless, and the interpolation of the instruments musings is polished to a pristine sheen.

Numbers like “Daven Dance” and “Get Me to the Shul on Time” will have audiences jumping in the aisles at concert halls. Both songs refer to prayer though they motivate the listener to let loose and move around freely. “In Phrygia” has a reggae groove in the undertow as Shapiro’s sax flutters liberally surging with fervor. The music is stimulating and affects listeners to think and feel positively. The swirling action furnished by acoustic bassist Brad Jones, guitarist Marc Rigot, and drummer Tony Lewis enhances the positive mood.

Shapiro’s duet with drummer Adam Randolph on “With Reed and Skins” is a freestyle dialogue between the saxophone and drums stoking a swinging bop exchange that explores the diverse tonality and crispness of the two instruments. The somber texture of the sax grazes gently across “Hashivenu,” a melody inspired by the Yom Kippur service, then plunges into a surfing jazz fluster of “Get Me to the Shul on Time” reminiscent of the theme songs from the ‘60s TV show Batman.
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