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Don't Shoot That Boy! Abraham Lincoln and Military Justice Hardcover – August 21, 1999

3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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The Black Presidency by Michael Eric Dyson
"The Black Presidency"
Rated by Vanity Fair as one of our most lucid intellectuals writing on race and politics today, this book is a provocative and lively look into the meaning of America's first black presidency. Learn more
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press; 1st edition (August 21, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1882810384
  • ISBN-13: 978-1882810383
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,144,280 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
A story in today's New York Times (January 25, 2011) reveals that Mr. Lowry has confessed to changing the date on a key document cited in this book to make it appear that Lincoln issued a pardon on the same day as his assassination. Mr. Lowry has reportedly confessed to sneaking a pen into the National Archives, rubbing out the original date (1864), and changing it to 1865 so that he could appear to have made a discovery that would in turn promote his book. He has now been banned from entering the National Archives, and his book is worthless except as an example of fraud, deception, and personal gain.
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Format: Hardcover
The National Archives has confirmed that Thomas P. Lowry, a longtime Abraham Lincoln researcher, confessed to altering a presidential pardon document so he could claim credit for finding a document of historical significance. Everything he has written should now be scrutinized because the data may be suspect.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Let the book introduce itself: "This thought-provoking study is based on hundreds of court-martial documents in President Lincoln's own hand (most never seen or used before). Thomas P. Lowry tells each story, each life-or-death decision and the factors that tipped the balance one way of the other. Each man waited for the single stroke of the President's pen. Would it be life of death? Freedom or prison? A dishonorable discharge of a chance at personal redemption?" Don't forget to start reading this book from the introduction. It tells the story of a farm boy named William Scott, who fell asleep while on watch and was sentenced to be shot to death. While the story is deeply touching, the facts behind the story are most surprising. Learn for yourself, a fascinating account of a part of the war rarely told.
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