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Shoot the Moon


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Product Details

  • Actors: Diane Keaton, Albert Finney, Hector Morales, George Murdock, Bill Reddick
  • Directors: Alan Parker
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: November 6, 2007
  • Run Time: 124 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000UPMZ3K
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #19,999 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Shoot the Moon" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Commentary by Alan Parker and Bo Goldman
  • Theatrical trailer

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

After fifteen years of marriage, an affluent couple divorce and take up with new partners.

Amazon.com

Two big-scaled performances fuel this bleak study of a marriage falling apart, a look at how two intelligent, civilized people can become children again when it comes to divorce. Albert Finney is a blustering writer who's found a younger woman (Karen Allen); Diane Keaton is the bewildered wife who falls into the arms of a younger man (Peter Weller), a contractor around the house. This might be comedy rather than tragedy were it not for the presence of the couple's three daughters, the oldest of whom (Dana Hill) holds a particular grudge against her father. This material was considered something of a change of pace for director Alan Parker, who'd worked in a slicker, noisier vein before (Midnight Express and Fame, for instance). Actually, Parker brings his usual over-determined approach, so the feel of the film is closer to a beautifully staged TV commercial than a searing Ingmar Bergman movie. Bo Goldman's script is heartfelt, but there doesn't seem to be much going on beneath the surface of this familiar saga. The performances by Finney and Keaton are expert, chivvying in whatever subtlety they can manage within Parker's overbearing world. The ending almost feels like a throwback to a certain strain of 1960s British cinema, and certainly doesn't let anybody--including the viewer--off the hook. --Robert Horton

Customer Reviews

Great acting by a great cast!
Johnny A. Large
This is a little film with great acting from Albert Finney and Diane Keaton.
mariano rodriguez
This mostly affects George, Faith, and their eldest daughter.
Judith T. Giles

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Siegel on July 21, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
One of the main reasons I rented and then bought this movie was because Diane Keaton was in it. Together, she and Albert Finney make this movie a truly devistating, powerful story of a couple who find that after fifteen years of marriage, it's over. Both performances were incredible, as was the performance of the oldest daughter, played by the late Dana Hill. She gave such a powerful performance, as a girl who didn't know whether to love or hate her father for leaving the family.
What made this a true gem was the relationship you see between Diane Keaton's character (Faith Dunlap) and her four children. You can automatically see how much she loves them and that she wants to protect them. At the same time, however, Albert Finney's character (George Dunlap) is taking the divorce in two separate directions: he's happy to not be living with his wife, but he misses her at the same time. You can immediately see that he loves the children as well and they love him.
The part that was very difficult to watch was when he (Finney) wanted to give Sherri (Dana Hill) her birthday present and she didn't want it. He got into the house anyway and locked Faith out and beat down his daughter's door and just let his rage out on her. It was so difficult to watch him to this, and the reaction of what he did, or realized what he did to his daughter brought tears to my eyes. Especially when Faith comforted her daughter and George saw that the two had a special relationship.
I would recommend this movie to people over the age of 18, since it is very powerful and has a lot of adult language and adult situations.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Christopher M. MacNeil on November 25, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
The disintegration of a marriage is usually red-flag matter when it's treated as an entertainment piece. But "Shoot the Moon" is, for some unknown reason, an underrated and under-appreciated (when it was released) showcase for the dynamic Diane Keaton and Albert Finney. Their marriage goes bust in this one, and in the anguish of both characters we feel likewise. The emotional fallout of the breakup of any marriage, even if its end is mutually sought, is acutely conveyed here, and Keaton and Finney manage to make us care about their characters, even if one is someone we might not otherwise want to care about. The film was one in a handful that Keaton did in her post-"Annie Hall" days but which helped catapault her to greater heights as a serious and accomplished dramatic actress ("Reds" quickly followed "Shoot the Moon" for Keaton, which garnered her a second Best Actress nomination). Why this film didn't generate more buzz when it was first released is inexplicable, but it's a hidden gem. When it's done, we have to appreciate its honesty: there's no "happily ever after" that neatly ties this one up.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Sean T. Maloney on September 19, 2007
Format: DVD
i am nothing short of flabbergasted that they are finally releasing this movie on dvd. i repeatedly watched this movie back in the 80's when my family had HBO growing up. a poignant and heart-wrenching film about the dissolution of a married couple with four young girls. diane keaton, albert finney, karen allen and peter weller give amazing performances but the real star here is dana hill. her performance in this film is nothing short of visceral. she was a light that burned so intense but yet so brief. a huge loss to filmdom. don't miss this film. definitely worth a re-visit and definitely worth exposing to new generations that are unfamiliar with it. this release along with "rich and famous" with candace bergen and jacqueline bisset by warner home video truly signifies that they have recently hired some smart cookies at that company. nice to also see that both films are released in widescreen rather than full screen that that other film company called sony is so fond of doing. did i mention that i can't stand sony?
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By L. J Nary on May 17, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
This movie is about a man and woman who have lost intimacy and passion in their marriage. Infidelity leads one of them to leave after being found out. This in turn leads to a pending divorce and how many times a week they get to see their children. Sounds familiar but this movie has a certain flair to it. It has alot of creativity and underlying emotions that can be seen by exceptional acting. This movie shows how it might feel to go through a separation from someone you have known and loved for a long time. It isn't just an easy thing and this movie points that out. Each partner grieves and gets angry and bargains, just like when you are dealing with death. The cinematography is quite nice. The relationship the children have with their parents is original, and highly entertaining, especially how they interact with Keaton. The house they live in is so cozy and warm, I wish I lived in it. The ending really hits home and leaves you wondering if she will forgive him? I guess the viewer gets to answer the question. Not your typical run of the mill movie fare with a pat ending and everybody smiling when they walk out of the theater. It is not about happy times, this movie represents separation via divorce reality, the harsh reality!
Lisa Nary
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dory P. on December 10, 2004
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
If you haven't seen "Shoot the Moon", see it. It is very difficult to find, as it appears to be out of print on video. I compare it somewhat to "The Pumpkin Eater" (Eng., 1964), with Anne Bancroft and Peter Finch, for a few reasons. Both films deal with bad marriages, in which the husband cheats. Also, the husbands in both films are writers (Peter Finch is a screenwriter, Albert Finney in "Shoot the Moon" is a novelist), and the wives are very supportive, up to a point. However, the similarities seem to end there.

Diane Keaton and Albert Finney play the husband and wife in "Shoot the Moon", and they are both absolutely superb. Ditto for Dana Hill, the actress playing their oldest child (very tragically, this very talented actress died in 1996 due to complications from diabetes). This film is so realistic, and the acting, all the way around, is so natural. The soundtrack offers a nice throwback to the '70's as well (Bob Segar, etc.). Also watch for a young Tracey Gold, who would later star in "Growing Pains" and a younger Tina Yothers, who would later star in "Family Ties". I highly recommend this film....a very good story and great acting together provide for a thoroughly enjoyable cinematic experience.
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