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Shoot Out: Surviving Fame and Misfortune in Hollywood Hardcover – Bargain Price, April 30, 2002


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Hardcover, Bargain Price, April 30, 2002
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 278 pages
  • ISBN-10: 0399148086
  • ASIN: B00008MNVR
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,796,619 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Writing in a direct, refreshing and honest style, Bart (Variety's editor-in-chief and a former v-p for production at Paramount) and Guber (the founder and head of Mandalay Entertainment and one-time production head at Columbia Pictures) offer an intimate view of the film industry and its unending economic, political and artistic clashes. While a reliable guide to the mechanics of movie making, the book is best at telling fascinating illustrative anecdotes that range from the scary (e.g., Frank Sinatra sending "one of his goons" to ensure that Roman Polanski would ask Sinatra's wife, Mia Farrow, to do only two takes of each scene on the set of Rosemary's Baby) to the charming (as when Guber is thrilled that Jimmy Stewart asks his opinion of a scene, only to realize that the star is interested in everyone's opinion, even the cleaning man's). This isn't a tell-all expos‚, … la Julia Phillips's You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again, but rather an informal, highly entertaining step-by-step survey of how all the parts of filmmaking fit together. From a succinct history of how TV spots and trailers have been developed to the problem of casting and managing megastars (e.g., Bruce Willis ended up in the huge hit The Sixth Sense because he needed an $18 million loan to get out of an independent film), the authors convey with irony and good humor the reality that "[t]he so-called `creative industries' are big business," but despite the huge economic stakes involved, "the vision keepers will win in the end."
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Most popular films are the end product of unique, creative filmmaking talent and technical expertise. However, sometimes the personalities involved in the production of a film steer the direction that the film takes. In this book, two filmmaking production veterans, Bart (editor in chief of Variety) and Guber (founder, Mandalay Entertainment), tell stories about the people who have affected the reality of popular film. Their years in the industry give them the wherewithal to relate all kinds of interesting anecdotes about famous directors, screenwriters, studios, and other members of Hollywood film production society past and present. In some entertaining asides, Bart and Guber trade off giving short sidebars on famous personalities in the film industry. The result is an insider's view of how some of the most popular films in history were made and subsequently consumed by the public. This will appeal to evolving filmmakers and others interested in learning about the day-to-day process of getting movies into production and up on the screen. Recommended for media libraries and academic libraries emphasizing popular film. David M. Lisa, Wayne P.L., NJ
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 10, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I had a chance to hear Bart and Guber speak at the Los Angeles Times Book Fair about this book and to meet them at the book signing afterward. My initial interest was in trying to find out if the stories you hear about guys like this are true. Was Guber really the type of person depicted in Kim Masterss book "Hit and Run"? Was Bart really the most hated man in Hollywood as a recent Los Angeles Magazine article suggested. Was Shoot Out (a loaded title if I ever heard one) the chance for these two guys to launch a full scale assault against their numerous critics? If that's what anyone is expecting (I know I was) you might be a bit disappointed. But it's not all bad.
This book is an interesting guidebook through the process of making movies from A to Z and I have to admit that it was a pretty enjoyable read. These guys have been in the entertainment business a long time and clearly know a thing or two about a thing or two when it comes to making movies. I found many of the stories and anecdotes amusing and relevant not only to "the industry" (in which I toil away at a menial production job currently) but relevant to many business practices in general.
In a way, I respect them for not pandering to the lowest common denominator and writing a Lynda Obst or Mike Medavoy style tell all (in case you haven't noticed I read way to many of these types of books). Shoot Out is not a great book, but for anyone who wants to learn about the true inner workings of Hollywood from two guys who've held a bunch of high level jobs, it is well worth your time...
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 17, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Different genre, but this book has a promotional effort on the web that is as significant to the book world as the Blair Witch site was to the movie world. Bravo to the authors and the publishing company for taking the lessons taught in the book and making them accesssible on a completely different scale even if you only have a 56k modem...
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By R. Spell VINE VOICE on August 16, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is unique in that it tries to tell the "behind the scenes" true war stories inside the context of a "road map to Hollywood deal making". I prefer the war stories but this book does a very good job in it's "how to" section being very careful to not let the reader get bored.
Peter Bart, who appears to do 80% of the writing, does an excellent job describing what is involved in doing a deal. It lets a nonindustry person realize why some movies are made that turn out to be bad movies. The bottom line is there is a process, a "Hollywood dance" so to speak, that is how deals progress. Many outsiders have talked about changing Hollywood to a more standard business environment. It will never happen. Too much history to change and frankly, with the creative people involved, they probably couldn't work in that environment. Disney has tried to shift the process with some success but the negative press does keep some creative people from working with them.
Peter Bart provides many war stories from the 1970s with Guber has more current stories given his success as a producer. I expected this book to be similar to Mike Medavoy's biography of his movie career. It wasn't. But it was still very good and would recommend it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10, 2002
Format: Hardcover
A terrific must-read for anyone pursuing a career in film or just the civilian Hollywood enthusiast. This book mergers a nuts-and-bolts broad view of how tinseltown operates with two film titans' war stories. Just don't forget that this is anything but impartial, with Guber's personal stories highlighting his victories and skipping over his failures. Bart comes off as having less to gain than his self-championing co-author, who can't help but toot his own horn at every turn. The narcissism notwithstanding, a quick, informative read.
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Format: Hardcover
I'm a big fan of Peter Bart's books and column in Variety, and Peter Guber certainly has a load of top-tier credentials. I'd really hoped for an insightful commentary on the current state of the movie business - but this isn't it. "Shoot Out" reads like a dozen other entry-level memoirs by bigtime moguls. There's nary an original comment, and (as other reviewers here have noted) too many war stories. "Final Cut" by Steven Bach gives you the story on "Heaven's Gate" far better than Guber and Bart (and they acknowledge as much); Sidney Lumet's book on making movies gives you a far better insight into the director's world and - above all - Frank Rose's magisterial "The Agency: William Morris and the Hidden History of Hollywood" tells the story of the rise of the agencies in far greater detail, with much more insight than do Guber and Bart.

I really had high hopes for this one, but it was a waste of time. Rose's book - and, of course, "Adventures in the Screen Trade" by William Goldman (again, acknowledged repeatedly by Guber and Bart) are essential reading. This sure isn't.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mike Finn on December 11, 2002
Format: Hardcover
As a fervent admirer of Peter Bart's previous books, The Gross and Who Killed Hollywood, I was extremely disappointed with this one. I feel he sold out by flacking for Peter Guber, whose exploits were richly detailed in the book "Hit and Run". There's really nothing new in here, and you'd be well advised to avoid it.
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