Prime Music
Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by momox com
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Please allow 1-2 weeks for delivery. For DVDs please check region code before ordering.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.90
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Shostakovich: The Girlfriends / Rule, Britannia, Op. 28 / Salute to Spain, Op. 44
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Shostakovich: The Girlfriends / Rule, Britannia, Op. 28 / Salute to Spain, Op. 44


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, May 26, 2009
"Please retry"
$11.55
$4.46 $3.46

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Introduction (opening credits)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 3:02$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): The Year 1914: The workers' residential block and factory gatesAgnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 2:08$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): The families wait for the strikers to returnAgnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 3:37$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): The Inn of the Keys to HappinessAgnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 2:24$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): The children attempt to sing their poppy song (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 2:56$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): By the river: Revolutionary song Zamuchen tiazheloi nevolei (Tormented by a Lack of Freedom) (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka0:51$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Fanfare (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka0:27$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen  8. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): The story of Silych's son, IvanAgnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 2:16$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen  9. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Zamuchen tiazheloi nevolei (Tormented by a Lack of Freedom) (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 5:11$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen10. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): The Year 1919, Russian Civil War - Fanfare and Organ Voluntary (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 1:35$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen11. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Internationale: The girls leave for war (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 2:03$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen12. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): The girls attend to the wounded soldiers on the battlefield (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 1:46$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen13. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Alla Marcia: The town of Pushkin has been taken by the enemy (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 1:08$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen14. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Internationale: The girls and the wounded soldiers retreat by trainAgnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 1:46$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen15. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Zoya in the snowy forest (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 1:45$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen16. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): The Forester's HutAgnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 2:50$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen17. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Fanfare: Andrei arrives with news from the front (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka0:29$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen18. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Fanfare (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka0:46$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen19. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): The girls find a chickenAgnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 1:56$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen20. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Natasha and Zoya sing a nostalgic song, Gde eti tyoplie nochi (Where are those warm nights?) (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 1:48$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen21. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Natasha and Zoya are rescued (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 1:40$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen22. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Fanfare: Andrei and Senka arrive (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Agnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka0:38$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen23. Podrugi (Girl Friends), Op. 41a (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald): Andrei's closing wordsAgnieszka Bochenek-Osiecka 3:13$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen24. Prav', Britaniya (Rule, Britannia), Op. 28 (arr. M.Fitz-Gerald): InternationaleCamerata Silesia 1:40$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen25. Prav', Britaniya (Rule, Britannia), Op. 28 (arr. M.Fitz-Gerald): Infantry MarchCamerata Silesia 1:50$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen26. Prav', Britaniya (Rule, Britannia), Op. 28 (arr. M.Fitz-Gerald): Along the Soviet RouteCamerata Silesia 1:06$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen27. Prav', Britaniya (Rule, Britannia), Op. 28 (arr. M.Fitz-Gerald): Protest (reconstructed by M. Fitz-Gerald)Camerata Silesia 2:28$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen28. Prav', Britaniya (Rule, Britannia), Op. 28 (arr. M.Fitz-Gerald): Raising the BannerCamerata Silesia0:36$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen29. Prav', Britaniya (Rule, Britannia), Op. 28 (arr. M.Fitz-Gerald): The Banners Flap in the WindCamerata Silesia 1:02$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen30. Salyut, Ispaniya (Salute to Spain), Op. 44: Fanfare IKamil Barczewski0:11$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen31. Salyut, Ispaniya (Salute to Spain), Op. 44: March of the OfficersKamil Barczewski 1:36$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen32. Salyut, Ispaniya (Salute to Spain), Op. 44: Fanfare IIKamil Barczewski0:09$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen33. Salyut, Ispaniya (Salute to Spain), Op. 44: Anon.: A las barricadas! (To the Barricades!) (arranged by M. Fitz-Gerald)Kamil Barczewski 1:16$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen34. Salyut, Ispaniya (Salute to Spain), Op. 44: Song of RositaKamil Barczewski 2:35$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen35. Salyut, Ispaniya (Salute to Spain), Op. 44: Fanfare IIIKamil Barczewski0:12$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen36. Salyut, Ispaniya (Salute to Spain), Op. 44: attrib. I. S. Aturov: Po dolinam i po vzgor'yam (Along the valleys and over the hills) (arranged by M. Fitz-Gerald)Kamil Barczewski 1:07$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen37. Salyut, Ispaniya (Salute to Spain), Op. 44: Reminiscence of the Song of RositaKamil Barczewski0:55$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen38. Salyut, Ispaniya (Salute to Spain), Op. 44: Lucia's Funeral MarchKamil Barczewski 2:42$0.89  Buy MP3 
listen39. Symphonic Fragment (1st version of Symphony no. 9)Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra 6:38$0.89  Buy MP3 


Frequently Bought Together

Shostakovich: The Girlfriends / Rule, Britannia, Op. 28 / Salute to Spain, Op. 44 + Shostakovich: Odna (Alone)
Price for both: $20.34

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

Product Details

  • Performer: Camerata Silesia, Adam Myrczek, Kamil Barczewski, Zdzislaw Lapinski, Aleksander Tesarczyk, et al.
  • Orchestra: Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra
  • Conductor: Mark Fitz-Gerald
  • Composer: Dmitry Shostakovich
  • Audio CD (May 26, 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Naxos
  • ASIN: B0020LSWXE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,551 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

This treasure trove of Shostakovich rarities presents four world premiere recordings. The music for the film The Girlfriends, newly reconstructed from various original sources including the 1934 soundtrack and a number of recently discovered Preludes,

Review

The Shostakovich archaeological dig continues, and we receive the fruits of its efforts. In the case of this album, there's one remarkable movement torso, a fine film score, and a pair of suites of bland incidental music.

The real find here is a portion of the original first movement to the Symphony No. 9. David Fanning located it--321 bars in an untitled manuscript--pressed within the autograph score of The Gamblers at Moscow's Shostakovich Archive. This, along with ink and handwriting similarities, made for a tentative identification. The clincher was Fanning's discovery of three duplicate pages in a folder of unarranged Shostakovich autographs at the Glinka Museum of Musical Culture, bearing a January 15, 1945, date. That matched to the month the point at which the composer began work on his Ninth. What we get is the full manuscript, lasting shy of seven minutes, with eight bars Fitz-Gerald provides for a final cadence.

This isn't the slyly satirical piece with an undertone of menace that we all know, cast in the dimensions of a Haydn symphony. The opening theme's motoric rhythms, rising motif, and abrupt thematic conclusion downwards to the tonic resemble Prokofiev in several respects. The rest is more typical of Shostakovich, with modal progressions, counterpoint, combat over thematic fragments between the strings and various winds, and an easy integration of the first theme's characteristics into the transformation/development. The effect of the whole is best likened to an exultant, massive force rolling irresistibly ahead. It sounds good, though I might make an uneducated guess both on internal grounds and on the basis of its part in Shostakovich's symphonic "war trilogy" that half again or more of the movement remained to be completed. Shostakovich didn't completely forget what he'd written, as the second theme ended up in a Violin Sonata in G Minor later that year; and when that work was in turn abandoned, it appeared in the 10th Symphony's first movement.

Lev Arnshtam was an old friend of Shostakovich's who ultimately became a distinguished film director. Of the four collaborations between the two men, The Girlfriends ("Podrugi"), finished in 1935, was the first. Its plot was a typical slice-of-life drama for the time: three girls grow up right before the fall of Tsarist Russia and decide to become nurses; all three end up at the front, and there are romantic entanglements; one dies, but the others carry on. The composer's score was extensive: at least 23 cuts (22 used in the final film), most of them two minutes in length or over, one lasting in excess of five. Shostakovich worked predominantly with chamber ensembles to create a form of unity, with some combination of piano, trumpet, and string quartet featured in most selections. There's also a small military band playing a rousing "Internationale," and another version of the same with a solo theremin that deserves to be separately noted. It frequently veers off the melody in long, eerie sweeps, not unlike a shortwave broadcast repeatedly losing and regaining its signal. This occurs when the girls are being evacuated by train at the last moment while under threat from advancing enemy troops, so it might have been an ingenious experiment by composer and director to provide a non-clichéd sense of rising tension. We'd have to see the results to judge, but the entire score is by turns richly expressive and clever. Shostakovich was supposedly proud of it, but it garnered no roses after its Soviet release during the Stalin-induced fallout from Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk.

Rule Britannia! , in turn, was a collection of six pieces for orchestra, two with chorus, which the composer wrote for Adrian Piotrovsky's play of the same name by the Leningrad Theater of Working Youth. The play was never produced, however, and Piotrovsky was arrested and executed during Stalin's 1938 purges. Salute to Spain was part of the rehabilitation process the composer was forced to go through in 1936. It was a short collection of incidental pieces written at the command of the Leningrad City Council for a play by Alexander Afinogenov. Neither suite pretends to be more than what it is, and that is the primary virtue of both. But the level of inspiration in these hack works is far, far lower than in the film scores.

As to the performances, Fitz-Gerald moves from the Frankfurt RSO last heard in the film score, Alone (Naxos 8.570316), to the Polish National RSO here, without much perceivable change in energy or character--surely the sign of a fine conductor who can communicate well with different ensembles. He and his orchestra create quite the impression with the fragmentary Ninth Symphony; if not the last word in technical finesse, it has the fervor, edge, clarity, and rhythm-based momentum that the composer requires. As much can be said for the Camerata Silesia and its individual musicians, who make up the smaller ensembles in The Girlfriends . A tip of the hat to Fitz-Gerald, too, in his capacity as reconstructive editor and all-around Shostakovich booster. Celia Sheen does an admirable job with the touchy theremin, and Kamil Barczewski provides an acceptable if throaty bass soloist in Salute to Spain.

Unusually scholarly notes by Olga Digonskaya, Peter Bromley, John Riley, Fitz-Gerald, and above all, David Fanning. (Be sure to catch the minor bombshell in Fanning's footnote to the material on the Ninth.) Definitely recommended to serious Shostakovich collectors. -- Fanfare, Barry Brenesal, 13 October 2009

This disc may be aimed more at the Shostakovich completist, but it's no less wonderful for that. The Girlfriends is a major film score dating from the same time in the 1930s as the scandal surrounding Stalin's denunciation of the opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk District. Scored lightly, for string quartet, piano, trumpet, and larger forces only in a couple of numbers, the music is mostly lyrical, attractive, and (given the composer and the period) remarkably sensitive. Some of it had to be reconstructed from the actual film soundtrack, but conductor Mark Fitz-Gerald has done his job excellently, and he leads a sensitive and cogent performance of the 23 brief movements that comprise the complete score.

Rule, Britannia! and Salute to Spain both fall into the composer's Socialist Realist hackwork, but I have to confess that the music is fun: brash, often militant, noisy, and unashamedly populist. The former strongly recalls the musical language of the Third Symphony, only it's less garish and more tuneful. There seems to be some confusion concerning one of the songs in Salute to Spain, "Miy Idyom", which means "We are going [on foot]" but that the note-writer translates for some strange reason as "My Idiom". In any case, no one knows what song was actually intended for the stage production, so an anti-Fascist Spanish Civil War song makes an appropriate substitute. Fitz-Gerald's conducting is really exciting in these two suites, and the orchestral playing is excellent as well.

Potentially the most interesting item here is the six-and-one-half-minute incomplete movement of what Shostakovich originally planned as his Ninth Symphony. Fans of the composer will recognize one of the themes as a loud version of the Tenth Symphony's first-movement second subject (the limping waltz for clarinet). As for the rest, it's clear why Shostakovich abandoned his initial effort: the remaining ideas (or should I say "idea", as there's only one) are uninteresting, the music uniformly loud and heavily scored. Still, as I said, this is a disc for connoisseurs, and you can only admire the composer's self-discipline in scrapping this effort in favor of the delightful Ninth Symphony we all know and love. Go for it. [6/1/2009] -- ClassicsToday.com, David Hurwitz, June 1, 2009

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By birdwalker on October 14, 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Shostakovich enthusiasts should buy this immediately. The music to The Girlfriends movie and the fragment from the first movement of an aborted start to a proposed Symphony #9 -- no relation to the existing #9 -- are echt DSCH; the other two works, Rule Britannia (name of a ship, not the anthem) and Salute to Spain are not as exciting, but no matter: they represent less than a third of the music on this CD.

Shostakovich occasionally makes reference to other composers in his compositions -- Beethoven and Rossini, for example. All these references are mentioned in liner notes and other material about the DSCH canon. In Girlfrends, however, there is an entire one minute arrangement of another composer's famous work -- and no mention in the excellent liner notes to this CD. I'm not telling you the band number, composer's name or work, because I'm hoping a knowledgeable reader will confirm my identification of the work by commenting on this website. Happy hunting!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
For ardent Shostakovich fans and scholars this release is an obvious must, as it contains several world premiere recordings. But despite the intriguing program I am less sure I can unequivocally recommend this disc to more general listeners. These are curiosities and the musical rewards are generally rather slim. The music for the movie The Girlfriends was written in 1934 for a story about three girlfriends who become nurses during the Russian Civil War. Only a few numbers have survived; the remaining ones - in fact, the majority of them - have been transcribed (by ear) by the conductor Mark Fitz-Gerald. There are 23 numbers in all, scored primarily for chamber forces (in addition to original music, Shostakovich incorporated some popular revolutionary songs for choral forces). Indeed, the music for the first track showed up in the second movement of Shostakovich's first string quartet, and apart from that very number there is preciously little in the score that is remotely memorable. The mood is generally rather bleak and even eerie (there are parts for the theremin here as well), and the style is consistent with the style of his early ballets, but there is no trace of the invention and imagination so obvious in The Golden Age or The Bolt.

The incidental music for Salute to Spain (1936) and Rule Britannia! (1931) are generally light-weight as well, adding some pomp and circumstance to rather slim musical contents. True, there are touches of Shostakovichian ingenuity in both works, and neither work should be dismissed as completely worthless, but neither is it music I can imagine many people would want to listen to more than once.

That leaves us with what is by some distance the main attraction of the disc, the Symphonic Movement from 1945.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in