Shostakovich: Symphony No. 11 'The Year 1905'

April 5, 2005 | Format: MP3

$7.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
20:10
30
2
21:27
30
3
13:27
30
4
17:20


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 2002
  • Label: LSO Live
  • Copyright: 2002 London Symphony Orchestra Ltd
  • Total Length: 1:12:25
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000QQRHJA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #111,716 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Here the sound from the engineers is outstanding.
H. Granot
Nevertheless the sound, though very dry, is ample, transparent and has a tremendous dynamic range.
MartinP
Shostakovich's 11th Symphony is a rather long, and very brooding, work.
Bob Zeidler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Bob Zeidler on September 19, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I first experienced this work many years ago, when Capitol Records (now part of EMI) released an LP set by Leopold Stokowski and the Houston Symphony Orchestra (still a favorite of mine, and presently available in well-mastered CD form from EMI). In subsequent years, I added performances by Bernard Haitink, Rudolf Barshai, and Rostropovich himself, when he had been the conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra. But it took only one hearing of this new "LSO Live" performance, with Rostropovich conducting the London Symphony Orchestra, for it to go to the top of this rather small pile of Shostakovich 11th Symphony recordings.

Shostakovich's 11th Symphony is a rather long, and very brooding, work. Ostensibly written to commemorate the 1905 Russian Revolution, its date of writing also suggests that it might contain one of his frequent "hidden messages," this one as a personal response to the Hungarian uprising and subsequent Soviet invasion of 1956. But perhaps it's best to ignore this highly-specific subtext, and simply accept the work as a more universal "commemoration to the victims of oppression everywhere."

Some Shostakovich symphonies (certainly the 1st, 5th, 8th and 10th, and perhaps the 6th and 9th) are heard in the concert hall much more frequently than this work, or for that matter, his other "war" symphony, the 7th ("Leningrad") Symphony. It follows - largely, anyway - that this work is not nearly as frequently recorded.

But, unless you are one who needs multiple versions of everything, this Rostropovich/LSO recording is likely to be the only one you'll ever need. Recorded live, it is, in a word, stunning.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By David A. Wend TOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 2, 2002
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This recording of Dimitri Shostakovich's 11th Symphony is a bit unusual: Mstislav Rostropovich adopted a much slower tempo in all of the movements. In fact, his recording is 16 minutes longer than the premiere recording by Mravinsky (Russian Revelation). The result is that the descriptive music, almost cinematic, is given a broader sweep. The brooding quality of the first movement is intensified and the violent confrontation of Bloody Sunday in the second movement seems all the more violent. (Gennady Rozhdestvensky has recorded the 11th with a second movement a minute longer than this recording). Rostropovich was quoted as applying the music of this symphony to the terrorist attacks of September 11, so this performance is more of an event. The slower tempos do make this symphony seem like one of the war symphonies (the 8th in particular) and more inspired than the faster tempos, say of Kondrashin (who recorded the 11th at a time of 54 minutes).
Although this recording with the London Symphony was a live performance there is no background noise and no applause at the end of the symphony, only the reverberation of the bells as the sound fades. This is a must have recording for Shostakovich lovers.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Larry VanDeSande VINE VOICE on December 26, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Shostakovich's 11th Symphony is more programmatic than most of his work in the symphonic canon and approaches his Symphony 7 "Leningrad" in spirit and word. Both are long and overstated symphonies about Russian history replete with ceremonial bombast and regular thematic repitition.

This symphony is billed as Shostakovich's take on the 1905 Russian pre-revolution although many analysts argue it is instead modeled after the Soviet invasion of Hungary in 1953. In either case it paints a portrait of people and events with discontent bubbling not far below the surface then boiling over into a cauldron of mania.

Like in his integral set of Shostakovich symphonies, Rostropovich's response to this music is highly emotional and broadly paced. He takes more than 72 minutes to get through the score compared to conductors that traverse the music in closer to an hour. In his still famous performance in Houston, Stokowksi's total time was about 10 minutes shy of Rostropovich's concert recording for the LSO Live label.

I would characterize Rostropovich's approach to this music as nearly silent brooding punctuated by terror. This is most obvious in the way he presents the two quieter movements (1 and 3) and follows them with the more boisterous movements (2 and 4). The contrast between the quiet brooding of the opening section, which is said to represent people gathering at the palace, and the savage militaristic rhythms of the timpani- and brass-driven mania of the second movement (where the palace guard opens fire on the crowd) is exemplary of his approach.

Comapred to conductors who direct this score as concert music, Rostropovich's approach is more personal and far more Russian.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By B. Lonano on August 12, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I have never heard a more intense, powerful and mindblowing piece of classical music than Shostakovich's Second momement to his 11th symphony. I recommend the cd just for the second movement alone. He captures the terror of the 1905 revolution or any horrific event with this music. This piece is organized chaos, and thats a great thing. If the end of the world comes, (and I hope it doenst for a while) I'd very much like this piece playing when it happens. At least, I'll listen to a great piece of music when I'm killed by giant monsters.
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