Customer Reviews

201
4.6 out of 5 stars
Shout at the Devil
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:$7.99 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I was in college in the fall of 1983 when I bought this originally on vinyl. I was huge (and still am) into KISS and thought these guys were trying a bit too hard to look like KISS. However, the graphics and look intrigued me and I bought this after seeing the "Looks That Kill" video and finding out Motley Crue wasn't a second-rate KISS after all. Maybe the attraction was due (in part) to the fact that KISS was dropping the make-up and I didn't want them to lose the look that made them, well, KISS!

I found that the Crue had their own style and sound that was a breath of fresh air in the mainly synth-pop early 80's. Rock n' roll was still ALIVE after all!

This CD is, from start to finish, THE best rocking Motley Crue ever gave us. "Too Fast For Love" was a primer and they hit their stride on "Shout At The Devil." EVERY song is excellent and it's non-stop nail biting rock all the way. They do mix it up a biy though. "God Bless The Children Of The Beast" is a suprisingly piece that (like KISS' "Beth") shows a dimension to the band that, on the surface, you would never guess was there.

"Too Young To Fall In Love" was perfect for the MTV crowd, and "Red Hot" and "Knock 'Em Dead Kid" was there for the true headbangers. The Crue even took a crack at The Beatles 'White Album' classic, "Helter Skelter," put their own mark on it and came up with a gem. Vince Neil is no Paul McCartney in the vocal department, but his voice works for the band regardless.

After seeing Motley Crue live in Pittsburgh in 1984 I was primed to have a new album. They came back in '85 with "Theatre Of Pain," but I found that one a bit "too MTV" - with the edge of "Shout" clearly tamed down. "Dr. Feelgood" may be their biggest seller, but they never sounded more like Motley Crue to me than on this TIMELESS CLASSIC - "Shout At The Devil!"

I don't think any Crue fan was disappointed when they heard this for the first time. I BECAME a fan thanks to this one.

Thanks Nikki, Vince, Tommy & Mick...for a true masterpiece of rock n' roll - and good luck on the road in 2005! SEE YOU THEN!
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
29 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on January 10, 2009
Format: Audio CD
I just turned 14 when this album was released, and at the time I would go to the drug or grocery store and buy every new "Circus" magazine, or whatever mag was covering the new wave of metal at the time. I read my first article on the hot new band from L.A., Motley Crue, and what they stood for was rebelling, drinking, partying, and having as much sex with great looking women as possible. And the bassist was into black magic and satan, he looked like a huge demon, like the demented, punk bastard child of Gene Simmons. It was early in 1983 and when I saw all the black and red in their band photos, blood, skulls and post apocolyptic imagery, I knew they had to be my kind of band.

"Shout At The Devil" is a consistent, raw, heavy but catchy album that's as dark as it was empowering and inspirational for what would become pop metal in the late 80's. I still have the original vinyl release with the Pentagram on the front, before it was banned and replaced.

Sure in 1983 looking like Alice Cooper or Kiss was still ok, but ended soon after, and I wish they would've kept their dark, gritty edge, but they were always a bunch of egotistic rock star jerks, and that was never bound to happen for fans who were with them "In The Beginning." (pun intended)

My favorite Crue song will probably always be "Knock 'em Dead Kid," and the rest of the album is quality from start to finish - something non-existent on any other Crue album, except for the radio hits of Dr. Feelgood.

With two solid MTV hit singles, "Too Young Too Fall In Love," and "Looks That Kill," Shout has always been an underrated album. Only it and "Dr. Feelgood" are complete albums, and I am not a big fan of the latter and never was. "Too Fast For Love" is closer to Shout in terms of it's raw recording quality and it's production and sound, but also a complete album, without the cheese and filler of "Girls" and "Theatre Of Pain."

Finally one of my best concert memories is seeing them open for Ozzy on the "Bark At The Moon" tour mentioned in the book "The Dirt." I met Ozzy at a record signing and backstage, got his autograph, and watched the Crue put on one of the best opening act shows I'd ever seen. It didn't matter if they were a bit sloppy, they had fire shooting everywhere, a post apocolyptic stage show and theme, they were chugging bottles of Jack Daniels onstage, and had a solid group of songs to play that were heavy and full of energy and attitude. They inspired total chaos and nothing was really off-limits for them, they weren't sensitive hair metal geeks, they were guys who were crazy enough to break a bottle on your head or kick you in the teeth if you got in their way or pissed them off. It was all about annoying the hell out of authority and parents and the government, and as a rebellious early 80's teen, I was all about that.

It's sad to see so few reviews here of this album.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on October 13, 2005
Format: Audio CD
THE BAND: Vince Neil (vocals), Mick Mars (guitar), Nikki Sixx (bass), Tommy Lee (drums). Home town: Los Angeles, CA.

THE DISC: 17 total tracks (16 music tracks, 1 bonus video "Looks That Kill"). The original 11 songs, plus 5 unreleased demos (3 songs from the album, and two new songs). All together, clocks in at approximately 60 minutes. Originally released on Elecktra Records label; digitally remastered and re-released on Hip-O Records.

COMMENTS: "Shout At The Devil" (1983) was my first real introduction to Motley Crue. When their debut ("Too Fast For Love") hit the street 2 years earlier, I thought it was good in a very raw sense... but it didn't hit me like "Shout" did. Where "Too Fast" was all over the place (coarse, unrefined, perhaps even immature), "Shout" was the slick polar opposite... cultivated, well written, professional, polished; a full-blown ripe and ready rock band ready to take on the world. As good as the hits were ("Looks That Kill", "Too Young To Fall In Love" and even briefly the remake of the Beatles' "Helter Skelter" hitting the FM airwaves), the deeper album cuts totally rocked... "Red Hot", Ten Seconds To Love", "Bastard", "Knock 'Em Dead Kid" and the title track were all classics in my book. The bonus cuts here are very worthy. It's great hearing alternate takes on such classic material. The two new songs are equally good - especially since I had never heard them before (I must admit, when I first picked up the new CD, I was hoping "Hotter Than Hell" was a remake of the old Kiss tune... but it's not). The Crue has numerous compilations ("Red, White & Crue" easily being the best) and "Shout At The Devil" is well represented on each. Some fans will say 1989's "Dr. Feelgood" is the Crue's best album. I agree that "Dr. Feelgood" was their most commercially successful release (4 major hits), but not the band's most rock solid collective effort. If you want one studio album from the Crue, it has to be this one. Great disc.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on October 14, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Although Motley Crue's debut album "Too Fast for Love" is a fine album that is held in high esteem today, upon its release in 1982, it failed to gain attention. Not detoured by their debut's lack of success, the Crue hit the studio once again with producer Tom Weirman to record their sophomore classic "Shout at the Devil" (1983).

"Shout at the Devil" is the album that put Motley Crue on the map and thrust them into superstardom. While "Dr. Feelgood" (1989) remains the Crue's best selling album, many fans regard "Shout at the Devil" as the band's magnum opus.

Eschewing the punk styling of their debut, the Crue opted for a heavier, fiercer look and sound for their second album. If "Too Fast for Love" paid tribute to the Clash and Generation X, "Shout at the Devil" barrowed a little from KISS and Aerosmith; but made the sound heavier. Song after song, "Shout" takes no prisoners. Indeed, "Shout at the Devil" is the bands heaviest, most intense release.

While "Shout" isn't exactly a concept record, defiance against corrupt authority seems to be the album's central theme. "Shout at the Devil" depicts a world without morality, a hopeless, empty, sorrowful place. Evil abounds, but you must fight it, be strong, and fight back.

One reason "Shout" is such a great album is the band really gives 100 percent effort. The Crue had not yet slipped into complacency and went into the studio full force. It's as though with "Shout," they wanted to make a statement. They wanted to tell the world that they were the meanest, baddest, loudest, fiercest band on the planet. With "Shout," Nikki Sixx (bass), Tommy Lee (drums), Mick Mars (guitar), and Vince Neil (vocals), give the performance of their career.

Not only did the Crue have the image and the attitude, they also had great songs to back it up. Simply put, Nikki Sixx's best songwriting is from this period. The songs are heavy, but also highly melodic. The whole album has great hooks and grooves, but is never overly commercial or contrived. While the Crue's later work was excellent if uneven, "Shout" is virtually flawless.

The album starts out with an introduction titled "In the Beginning," which describes a world gone to hell. The narrator tells the listener to fight back, "be strong and Shout at the Devil!" This introduction is essential to setting the atmosphere for the rest of the album and is a great lead-in the album's title track. The mid-tempo "Shout at the Devil" has a magnificent pounding beat with a sinister riff and groove. The rapid-fire "Looks that Kill" is probably the album's catchiest song, which may be why it was chosen as a single. The hard-hitting "Bastard" is good, if not excellent, and keeps up the momentum.

The album slows down a bit for the haunting instrumental "God Bless the Children of the Beast," which is a nice change of pace. This leads perfectly into a cover of the Beatles "Helter Skelter." "Helter Skelter" is considered by some to be one of the first metal songs ever written, so its inclusion is not entirely out-of-place. The Crue more-or-less stick to the original sound of the track, but give it a little more of a metal trimming. Although not quite up-to-par with the original (it is The Beatles after all), it's definitely a worthy cover and a great addition to "Shout." "Red Hot," while not the album's most well-known song, is quite strong and infectious. "Too Young to fall in Love," another Motley staple, is the closest the album comes to an actual balled. The intensity of the album only increases as it winds down with the no-holds-bar "Knock `em Dead Kid," and "Ten Seconds to Love." The intensity levels off with "Danger," which makes for a good closing number.

The remastered edition has plenty of bonus material that should be of interest to fans. Demo versions of "Shout at the Devil," "Looks that Kill," and "Too Young to fall in Love" show the songs as works-in-progress and are of important historical value. The demo "Hotter than Hell" was re-worked, and re-titled "Louder than Hell" for the Crue's follow-up album "Theatre of Pain" (1985). It's cool to hear a "Theatre of Pain" era song as it might have been used for "Shout." The unreleased "I Will Survive" is good, but not great.

Released in 1983, "Shout at the Devil" has held up fairly well. It may seem a little dated and tame when compared to something like Marilyn Manson's "Antichrist Superstar" (1996) or other more recent metal bands, but "Shout" was one of the first of its type. It should be noted that Manson himself is a big fan of this album. So without "Shout," there would be no "Antichrist Superstar."

Along with "Too Fast for Love," and the highly underrated self-titled "Motley Crue" (1994), "Shout at the Devil" remains the Crue's best work. Although there were many imitators, some good, some bad, "Shout at the Devil" remains a quintessential 80s heavy metal album.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on December 12, 1998
Format: Audio CD
If you are going to buy one Crue album, this is definitely my choice. If you can get past the makeup, outfits and the goofy satanic theatrics, you should really enjoy this if you are a hard rock fan. Not the most thought provoking piece of work, but it is not supposed to be. It is just pure adrenline. Some of my favorites that never seem to make it on any of the greatest hits collections include Red Hot, Too Young to Fall in Love and a killer version of Helter Skelter.
A must-have for any fan of 80's metal.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on October 14, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Although Motley Crue's debut album "Too Fast for Love" is a fine album that is held in high esteem today, upon its release in 1982, it failed to gain attention. Not detoured by their debut's lack of success, the Crue hit the studio once again with producer Tom Weirman to record their sophomore classic "Shout at the Devil" (1983).

"Shout at the Devil" is the album that put Motley Crue on the map and thrust them into superstardom. While "Dr. Feelgood" (1989) remains the Crue's best selling album, many fans regard "Shout at the Devil" as the band's magnum opus.

Eschewing the punk styling of their debut, the Crue opted for a heavier, fiercer look and sound for their second album. If "Too Fast for Love" paid tribute to the Clash and Generation X, "Shout at the Devil" barrowed a little from KISS and Aerosmith; but made the sound heavier. Song after song, "Shout" takes no prisoners. Indeed, "Shout at the Devil" is the bands heaviest, most intense release.

While "Shout" isn't exactly a concept record, defiance against corrupt authority seems to be the album's central theme. "Shout at the Devil" depicts a world without morality, a hopeless, empty, sorrowful place. Evil abounds, but you must fight it, be strong, and fight back.

One reason "Shout" is such a great album is the band really gives 100 percent effort. The Crue had not yet slipped into complacency and went into the studio full force. It's as though with "Shout," they wanted to make a statement. They wanted to tell the world that they were the meanest, baddest, loudest, fiercest band on the planet. With "Shout," Nikki Sixx (bass), Tommy Lee (drums), Mick Mars (guitar), and Vince Neil (vocals), give the performance of their career.

Not only did the Crue have the image and the attitude, they also had great songs to back it up. Simply put, Nikki Sixx's best songwriting is from this period. The songs are heavy, but also highly melodic. The whole album has great hooks and grooves, but is never overly commercial or contrived. While the Crue's later work was excellent if uneven, "Shout" is virtually flawless.

The album starts out with an introduction titled "In the Beginning," which describes a world gone to hell. The narrator tells the listener to fight back, "be strong and Shout at the Devil!" This introduction is essential to setting the atmosphere for the rest of the album and is a great lead-in the album's title track. The mid-tempo "Shout at the Devil" has a magnificent pounding beat with a sinister riff and groove. The rapid-fire "Looks that Kill" is probably the album's catchiest song, which may be why it was chosen as a single. The hard-hitting "Bastard" is good, if not excellent, and keeps up the momentum.

The album slows down a bit for the haunting instrumental "God Bless the Children of the Beast," which is a nice change of pace. This leads perfectly into a cover of the Beatles "Helter Skelter." "Helter Skelter" is considered by some to be one of the first metal songs ever written, so its inclusion is not entirely out-of-place. The Crue more-or-less stick to the original sound of the track, but give it a little more of a metal trimming. Although not quite up-to-par with the original (it is The Beatles after all), it's definitely a worthy cover and a great addition to "Shout." "Red Hot," while not the album's most well-known song, is quite strong and infectious. "Too Young to fall in Love," another Motley staple, is the closest the album comes to an actual balled. The intensity of the album only increases as it winds down with the no-holds-bar "Knock `em Dead Kid," and "Ten Seconds to Love." The intensity levels off with "Danger," which makes for a good closing number.

The remastered edition has plenty of bonus material that should be of interest to fans. Demo versions of "Shout at the Devil," "Looks that Kill," and "Too Young to fall in Love" show the songs as works-in-progress and are of important historical value. The demo "Hotter than Hell" was re-worked, and re-titled "Louder than Hell" for the Crue's follow-up album "Theatre of Pain" (1985). It's cool to hear a "Theatre of Pain" era song as it might have been used for "Shout." The unreleased "I Will Survive" is good, but not great.

Released in 1983, "Shout at the Devil" has held up fairly well. It may seem a little dated and tame when compared to something like Marilyn Manson's "Antichrist Superstar" (1996) or other more recent metal bands, but "Shout" was one of the first of its type. It should be noted that Manson himself is a big fan of this album. So without "Shout," there would be no "Antichrist Superstar."

Along with "Too Fast for Love," and the highly underrated self-titled "Motley Crue" (1994), "Shout at the Devil" remains the Crue's best work. Although there were many imitators, some good, some bad, "Shout at the Devil" remains a quintessential 80s heavy metal album.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on June 12, 1998
Format: Audio CD
This CD is the last of the non-commercialized Motley Crue CD's. While Theater Of Pain was a decent CD, it wasn't truly a Motley Crue CD. If you like good old-fashion heavy metal that still sounds great today, buy this CD.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on June 12, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Shout at the Devil is a critically important album. While its predecessor, Too Fast for Love, was quite good, SATD lunged forward with a fury that left the aforementioned release in a glamorous dust. SATD is heavy--in pacing, in mood, in lyrics, in its mantra. But it's an image of a moment in musical time and location that will never happen again. It never could happen again. Ask anyone who survived it. You can hear the Sunset Strip beginning to unravel even here in 83'--well before Cobain--and in many ways this sad imminent doom is every bit as punk as albums that are officially labeled as such. This album never tried to be punk; it just is, and that is what makes it so, even if it is in a non-standard way.
Knock em Dead Kid -- Loomis
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on October 19, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Motley was one of the first metal acts I really got seriously into as a teenager, after Iron Maiden and Ozzy Osbourne. I first heard them on a radio broadcast of the '83 US Festival, and while that performance, long thought of as one of their worst, didn't knock me out, I heard enough in their songs to get my attention. Much to the horror of my mom, I went out and bought the original vinyl record, complete with its pentagram cover, and began absorbing the violent, misogynistic and always rude music that was Motley Crue. After one listen, I was hooked.

Though it is nearly as politically incorrect as the early Guns N'Roses records, this album still holds up remarkably well today, mainly for its crisp, flawless production set to some of the rawest music ever made. The subject matter will still make mothers across America cringe, from the anarchistic title track to "Ten Seconds To Love" (a reference to quickie sex in an elevator) to the violence and vengeance of "Bastard." The album's sole ballad, "Danger," is also a dark and violent piece, bringing to life the dark side of life in Hollywood. "Looks That Kill," "Too Young To Fall In Love," and "Red Hot" are also classics to all true Motley fans.

This is an album that is strong from beginning to end, and has been criminally overlooked by the mainstream media as one of the most influential albums of all time, mostly because of the hair-metal movement that it influenced. But while many bands attempted to copy the Crue, nobody even came close, and that is whey they are one of the only bands from that time whose music has survived and is still a staple of Classic Rock radio today. This is still the Crue at the absolute top of their game, and if you only own one of their records, this should be the one.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on November 14, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Motley Crue entered their prime in 1983 with "Shout At The Devil." This album is loud, heavy, and is full of Motley classics and the lyrics to the songs are excellent. This album was the starting point for Motley Crue's fame. It was their second album and it sold 4 MILLION copies with numerous hits including the title track, "Looks That Kill", "Ten Seconds To Love", and "Helter Skelter." This is one of my favorite albums of all time.
The title track, "Shout At The Devil" is EXCELLENT! The opening starts out with Tommy doing a bass drum beat and banging the symbols. Then the band screams, "Shout! Shout! Shout At The Devil!" The song is well done with the beats and the amazing riffs by Nikki and Mick. The song is a MASTERPIECE! The next track, "Looks That Kill" is just as good as the title track. The chorus line is really catchy and is pure Motley Crue. It's definately another Motley classic. TWO Motley Crue classics back to back on the same album? What more could you ask for?
Then we have "Helter Skelter." This song is great. The beats, riffs and Neil's vocals make this song another classic. The next track is "Red Hot." This song has a huge bass riff well done by Nikki. Also on the drums Tommy is playing an excellent bass drum line. The next Motley Crue classic is "Ten Seconds To Love." This song is very catchy and has EXCELLENT lyrics. The chorus line is, "Ten Seconds To Love! Ten Seonds To Love!" The way they sing the chorus line really gets to you. This song is a definite MASTERPIECE!
Buy this album to see how Motley Crue kickstarted their fame. The Crue came out with some of their greatest hits to date that are still played today. So what are you waiting for? Stand Up And...SHOUT AT THE DEVIL!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Too Fast for Love
Too Fast for Love by Motley Crue (Audio CD - 2008)

Greatest Hits
Greatest Hits by Motley Crue (Audio CD - 2009)

Theatre of Pain
Theatre of Pain by Motley Crue (Audio CD - 2008)
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.