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Shoutin in Key: Live Live


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Audio CD, Live, June 20, 2000
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Biography

American blues musician Taj Mahal, was born Henry Fredericks in New York in 1942. His music is a mix of blues, Caribbean styles, bluegrass and the music of Hawaii, where he lived for a number of years.

He formed Rising Sons with fellow bluesman Ry Cooder, playing at Whisky a Go Go, which gave him the opportunity to play with blues legends, amongst them Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters and ... Read more in Amazon's Taj Mahal Store

Visit Amazon's Taj Mahal Store
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Frequently Bought Together

Shoutin in Key: Live + Maestro + Senor Blues
Price for all three: $41.66

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 20, 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Live
  • Label: Hannibal
  • ASIN: B00004TJVI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #191,609 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Honky Tonk
2. EZ Rider
3. Ain't That A Lot Of Love
4. Ev'ry Wind (In The River)
5. Stranger In My Own Home Town
6. Woulda Coulda Shoulda
7. Leavin' Trunk
8. Rain From The Sky
9. Mail Box Blues
10. Cruisin'
11. Corrina
12. The Hoochi Coochi Coo
13. Sentidos Dulce

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Recorded live over three nights at The Mint in Los Angeles, California, SHOUTIN' IN KEY finds Taj Mahal living up to his reputation as an authentic American troubadour. With warmth, elegance and obvious devotion, Taj Mahal and The Phantom Blues Band slide

Amazon.com

Recorded live over three nights in Los Angeles in 1998, Shoutin' in Key provides an accurate snapshot of late-1990s Taj and his all-inclusive view of the blues. In fact, blues is really just one ingredient in a stew that offers hard-driving, horn-fueled R&B, gently swaying Caribbean-style rhythms, slow-burning soul, loose reggae jams, 12-bar stomps, smart jazzy grooves, and polished country-blues updates. On this album, he's most compelling the further afield he moves. His reading of Delroy Wilson's "Rain from the Sky," a Jamaican standard, is a highlight here, as is his own Latin-jazz-infused instrumental, "Sentidos Dulce." And he delivers fine readings of signature songs like "Mail Box Blues," "Corrina," and "Leavin' Trunk" as well. While he's not at his most consistently inspired throughout, there are certainly enough high points to make this a worthwhile introduction to the Mahal style. --Marc Greilsamer

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By John Owen on June 25, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Theeze days, the blues too often seem to be played by hormonal youngsters who skipped straight to the full-throated showboating of Stevie Ray Vaughan or Buddy Guy without stopping to learn the subtlety of Albert King, Muddy Waters, or even Robert Johnson.
Taj Mahal has never been one to strain himself keeping up with trends, but has been happy to trace his own path. Sometimes that path got a little wierd, but by keeping the faith of the aforementioned players, "Shoutin' in Key" represents a massive return to form of the most underrated of all the performers who played (the original) Woodstock.
Backed by a tight ensemble and blessed with the best and cleanest sound I have ever heard from a live blues recording, Taj Mahal lives up to the promise of the album's title, wringing great energy out of old and new songs, while never resorting to pyrotechnics or volume to compensate for a lack of ideas. On the contrary, each cut on this album is played with fierce originality and freshness. Songs like "Corrina, Corrina," or "Leavin' Trunk" absolutely cook, complemented by fantastic bandwork and swinging, economical solos.
With this recording, blues fans will find a refreshing break from the overheated riffage of too much current blues, and a reminder that great blues doesn't have to mean screaming at 200 mph.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By loce_the_wizard VINE VOICE on March 3, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This cleanly recorded, live set from Taj Mahal backed by the excellent, tight Phantom Blues Band, blends all sorts of musical flavors into a refined amalgam. The strain, stress, and anguish that make too many forays into contemporary blues a sure-fire ticket for a migraine are cast aside for grace, craft, and smoothness. On the other hand, there is enough edge here to add texture. In many ways, the energy, vibe, and diversity here remind me of the superb but obscure "Rust" by Kevin Brown, must more so than the largely sterile renderings from say Eric Clapton.

Everything comes together without sounding contrived or forced, and Taj Mahal, as always, marches to his own drum beat (well, actually some snappy percussion work from Tony Braunagel). Mick Weaver, a fellow who has sat in with about everybody at one time or another, handles the keyboards deftly. Danny Freeman, who cut his chops with the borthers Vaughan hits the right tone throughout, and Larry Fulcher clearly knows his way around on bass. The Texacali horns provide the bright seasoning, and Taj deftly stays out front without quashing everyone else's good time or taxing himself too much.

This recording would make a great soundtrack for a ramble through the country or a backyard cookout.
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Format: Audio CD
Okay, okay about a year or so ago when I was reviewing every possible blues artist that ever hit the pavements in the 20th century I mentioned, in a review of an old film documentary of country blues artists, Son House and Bukka White, that was hosted by Taj Mahal that I needed to do a separate review on his important blues contribution. Well, here I finally get around to putting paid on that pledge, although this CD with his one time Phantom Blues Band represents only on aspect of his work.

The important thing to note about Taj is that although he is well-versed in the old country tunes, witness the cover of the country blues classic "Corrina, Corrina", and of the electric blues long identified with Chicago, witness his own "Mail Box Blues" here, he is also one of the exemplars of the Carib blues beat that is closely associated with the New Orleans blues tradition. Check out his "Every Wind In The River" on that score. Of course, given his West Indian roots this is to be expected but it also means that he is not easily categorized. This mix comes out more fully in other albums that I will review later but I will just alert the reader to that influence here.

Note: I have seen Taj Mahal in concert on many occasions and in many venues; folk, blues, and rocks. Sometimes he will blow you away with his musical energy. Other times he has seemed to lack direction and clarity about what he was trying to present. That is not true here and I believe that his band of well thought of musicians is the key to keeping things tight.
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By A Customer on June 26, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Excellent show of years of blues vocals and experience! Taj Mahal is a legend in his own time.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By jbembe on October 29, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Next to Eric Clapton, I'd have to say that Taj's blues are the best around. Look no further than track 3, Ain't That Alotta Love? for the perfectly executed blues song. From the bass line to the vocals, you don't get better. This album has found its way among my short list of classics, and well-deserving. I can't wait to get the chance to see him jam live in person!
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