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Showcase Presents: Strange Adventures Vol. 2 Paperback – December 24, 2013


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Paperback, December 24, 2013
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Showcase Presents: Strange Adventures Vol. 2 + Showcase Presents: Superman Family Vol. 4 + Showcase Presents: Sgt. Rock Vol. 4
Price for all three: $45.34

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Product Details

  • Series: Showcase Presents (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 520 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; First Edition edition (December 24, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401238467
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401238469
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 6.6 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #82,313 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Daneel Olivaw on December 24, 2013
This is a collection of the original Strange Adventures comic book published by DC Comics after the institution of the Comics Code Authority, which means you aren't going to get the meatiness of sci-fi stories earlier popularized by "Weird Science" and "Weird Fantasy" from the classic EC comics. No, this is science fiction for kids, filled with plots heavy on irony and the most common problem being all the advanced alien civilizations who want to conquer us. This second book of Strange Adventures reprints contain issues #74-93, originally published between 1956-1958 as the real "space age" began.

Most of the stories in this book were written by John Broome, Edmond Hamilton. Gardner Fox and Otto Binder--mainstays of DC at the time and all destined to thrive on super-hero fare during the Silver Age, which also had just begun. The art is mostly by famous DC artists Carmine Infantino and Sid Greene, with covers by Gil Kane. These reprints are in black-and-white on pulp paper, typical of the cheaper production values of these bargain-priced Showcase collections. The original comics, published in color, were edited by that old sci-fi fan Julius Schwartz.

Although I don't want to be a spoiler, let me summarize just one story to illustrate the typical mindset of these comics. A giant electronic brain suddenly appears in the middle of a major U.S. city, sent by aliens bent on taking over the Earth. Its mission is to transmit all data useful to our would-be conquerors so they know what to expect and can be certain their weaponry can overcome ours. The giant electronic brain gets much of its data by absorbing human brain waves and mining the data from them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. R. Trtek TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 9, 2014
This volume extends the run of Strange Adventures reprints begun in volume 1 with SA No. 54. This book ends at No. 93, in 1958. By then, I had begun reading the title as a child, though my interest would soon turn to Silver Age super-heroes. These stories, penned primarily by Gardner Fox and Otto Binder, with others such as John Broome contributing now and then, are to some extent throw-backs to the early days of "super science" plots, often focusing on alien invasion, with some Twilight Zone twists now and then. As another reviewer has noted, these are science fictional stories -- or fantasies dressed up as science fiction -- for children, with little of the texture and sophistication featured in analogous EC titles of the early 1950s. Still, if you can cast yourself as an eight-year-old, they can be fun, and it is interesting to see the work of artists such as Carmine Infantino and Gil Kane (on covers) in a non-super-hero context.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Morgan Painter on February 9, 2014
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What a bargain getting these B & W reprints from the fifties. Plus you don't have to leaf through those endless ads for 'Sea Monkeys.' And such a deal. It would cost a small fortune to get these classics in the original comic book form. The service was fast and the book arrived in perfect condition since it was extremely well packaged. I sure hope they reprint more in this series.
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The reason I think this is fun, because I remember as a pre-teen buying this title; drinking in this wonderful science fiction and great art. So here we are, more than half a century later, seeing what went for sci-fi back then. The stories were VERY short-- often only 8 pages, with not enough time to develop a character or put in more than one twist. But for a pre-teen with a short attention span (like kids today) that was plenty. Looking back, having aliens on Mercury through Pluto (while it was still a planet!) seemed perfectly reasonable. The joy I got out of this issue was guessing who penciled the story, and who inked it. I was almost perfect guessing the penciller (usually Gil Kane, Carmine Infantino or Sid Greene, with a few others thrown in). The tougher part was guessing the inkers (Joe Giella, Bernard Sachs, or the pencillers themselves-- oddly, no Murphy Anderson in this issue). Who wrote it was a wild shot. If only these Showcase titles were in color-- but then they would cost 3x as much.
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