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Comment: All pages are intact, and the spine and cover are also intact. May have some usage wear, missing or damaged dust jacket, stickers, cover creases, bumped corners, bent pages, remainder mark, previous owner label or name, inscription, notes, underlining and/or highlighting. Text only; no CDs, InfoTrac, Access Codes, Activation Keys, or other inclusions, unless otherwise noted.
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The Shuttle (Classic Reprint) Paperback – August 14, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 522 pages
  • Publisher: Forgotten Books (August 14, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1451002963
  • ISBN-13: 978-1451002966
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #930,306 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

What a delightfully, wonderful story!
S. Merkel
If there is one negative thing to say about the story, it is that the characters are so black and white.
Meks Librarian
This book is surprisingly timely for a book published over one hundred years ago.
C. Alvarado

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

80 of 84 people found the following review helpful By Ann E. Nichols on September 9, 2001
Format: Library Binding
The book is set in the 19th century, but the heroine, Bettina Vanderpoel of the filthy rich New York Vanderpoels, is no shrinking violet. That role is left to her older sister, sweet and not overly bright Rosalie. The story starts out with Rosalie being courted by and married to Sir Nigel Anstruthers, an impoverished English aristocrat on the make for a rich wife. Although she is only eight at the time, Betty hates Sir Nigel. Her instincts are on the money. Sir Nigel is a rotter, a blackguard, a cad, and a bounder. He is utterly infuriated that he did not automatically gain control of Rosalie's money when he married her. He and his equally appalling mother start a loathsome campaign of emotional abuse that gentle Rosalie is not equal to. Luckily, by chapter five it is 12 years later and Bettina has grown into a fine, strong-minded woman who has all the business sense that made the Vanderpoel fortune. The rest of the book tells us how she rescues her sister, her nephew, and the Anstruthers estate from Sir Nigel. The hero of the book is another impoverished aristocrat, but cut from genuinely noble cloth, even if most of his ancestors were of the Sir Nigel type.
Before the book is over, Bettina will be trapped, injured, and at the mercy of Sir Nigel, who has Perfectly Awful plans for the lovely lady. Will Bettina wring her hands helplessly and beg?
Don't be silly. Read and see how love, virtue, and justice triumph and Sir Nigel gets his.
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60 of 63 people found the following review helpful By F. J. Powell on February 7, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I have a 1907 edition of this book that I love.. I've read it several times and each time I savour the language and the world that Frances Hodgeson Burnett described before the First World War: a world of English village streets with sound of carts clattering past hawthorn hedges and brash young American boys bicyling in buttonup boots and celluloid collars up the pleached alleys of country estates.

I think that the previous reviewer has unfortunetely missed much of the subtlety of the story, painting it in almost comicbook colours. It's "comfort reading" for adults who grew up making friends with Little Lord Fauntleroy and a Secret Garden. This is a novel that celebrates the goodness of people and cultures on both sides of the Atlantic in tender and funny ways that remind me of Lousia May Alcott's books and in the end, metes out justice in very satisfying ways. You might also want to see if you can find F H Burnett's "T. Tembarom" --which is, as her characters themselves might put it, a "bang-up" book as well.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Sheila C. Emanuel on May 2, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a fantastic book and a long one (I like that). I took it on a ski vacation and was tempted to take it to the slopes with me. I finally realized that was not a great idea but I could hardly wait to get back to my room, get comfortable, and begin reading again.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Cheryl Weaver on January 8, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book reminds me of George McDonald - the writing is beautiful. It reads and sounds beautiful. I have not read a Burnet book for many years - when I read The Secret Garden which has always been my favorite. The Shuttle shows how money can be used to help and not put people in a welfare mentality of life. Yes the Vanderpools had money and spent it to their pleasure and then Betty saw how money could bring relief to people without making them dependent on them or belittling them. It was a good character study of two girls born into the same family and certainly of different character strengths and how help is given within a family. It is the 1900's, so life is different from today - slower, things take longer to be accomplished - which was shown as a good thing. Even getting across the 'big pond' took so long and then in the day to day events, time was needed for things to be accomplished. Betty and Rosalie, Dad and Mom, parent traits pass down to the children. It is interesting to see the same traits carried out in the next generation. I highly encourage you to take the time to read this book.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By MS on April 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
"The Shuttle* was written in the early 1900's, but it shows the brutality of spousal abuse--mental and physical--with no holds barred. Gentle Rosalie undergoes years of cruel emotional battering which is described with absolute psychological accuracy. It turns out that her sister Bettina is strong and determined enough to save both of them. Sir Nigel's end is satisfying, although it might have been even better if he'd fallen into the pigpen and been devoured by swine. This is a very early and powerful feminist novel as well as a skillfully written, entertaining page-turner.
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By GEORGE J. STEWART on July 18, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
5 stars for the plot. 3 stars for the needless droning on of inner thought, family histories... Betty is an amazingly mature, self-contolled young woman. Mount Dunstan is the typical Hollywood hero: tall, muscular, handsome, prideful, honorable, hard working, introspective and a bit morose. Sir Nigel is thoroughly distasteful, inhumane, cruel, and evil. Rosalie, Betty's older sister is goodness, frailty, and femininity as is Melanie in Gone With the Wind. Overall a good story, just too long.
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By Evergreen on February 3, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you like Before and After scenarios with a dash of romance and lots of period detail, you'll love this story. Though familiar with beloved authoress of Secret Garden and Little Lord Fauntleroy fame - Frances H. Burnett -, I had never heard of The Shuttle before. After downloading it onto my Kindle, I settled back to enjoy this marvelous serendipity. I'm halfway through and can't put it down. Enjoy!!!
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