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62 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exceptional Expansion Giving Us the Best Civ Yet
As of the date of this review, the base Civilization V game has an overall rating of 2.5 on Amazon. This, perhaps more than everything else, goes to show the wide divergence of opinions directed towards the latest Civilization installment.

While the complaints directed towards Civ V by its critics are diverse, the one heard the most often is that the game has...
Published on June 24, 2012 by T. RHEAULT

versus
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Better, but still behind Civ IV.
I loved Civilization from the first game. I even tried Call to Power, but couldn't do it.

Civ 5 clearly simplified too much, I must assume they wanted to increase the pontential number of players, but I don't see how the regular Civ 5 could please anyone.
So now the idea is to introduce again Religion and Espionage into the game and (hopefully) some added...
Published on August 26, 2012 by H. N. T.


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62 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exceptional Expansion Giving Us the Best Civ Yet, June 24, 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
As of the date of this review, the base Civilization V game has an overall rating of 2.5 on Amazon. This, perhaps more than everything else, goes to show the wide divergence of opinions directed towards the latest Civilization installment.

While the complaints directed towards Civ V by its critics are diverse, the one heard the most often is that the game has been simplified too much. "Dumbed down" is the colloquial expression heard most often about the game by its detractors. I myself am very fond of Civ V, but in my review of the base game on Amazon, I pointed out several items detracting from the game, including the lack of espionage and unintuitive diplomacy options.

With the release of the Civilization V: Gods & Kings expansion, those concerns have been addressed splendidly.

First, religion has been restored to Civilization V. Many have criticized the lack of religion from Civ 5, after having it be a major part of Civ IV. Not only is religion back in Civ V with the Gods & Kings expansion, but it is now better than ever. Specifically, when you start a religion early in the game, you are not only given the choice of which religion to begin but also allowed to choose the enhancements/perks your religion provides to the cities following that religion. In addition, you are periodically given the Great Prophet unit, which can do a number of interesting functions: spreading your religion to other cities, giving your religion further enhancements, etc.

Religion was fun in Civ IV, but could also be ignored fairly easily. Civ V makes religion more important, more intuitive, and more fun. You will not want to ignore it because of how enjoyable it is to manage.

Second, the other major addition (or restoration, depending on your point of view) is espionage. Espionage has been addressed in previous Civilization games (notably, the Sid Meiers Civilization IV Beyond the Sword expansion), but I feel it is implemented in a more enjoyable way in the Civ V: Gods & Kings expansion. Instead of bogging you down in micromanagement, the espionage feature in Gods & Kings allows you to pick where to spend your spies, and then after a few turns you begin to get some feedback from your spies and options on how to proceed. Options range from stealing technology from another nation (for which your spy may get caught, resulting in negative diplomatic repercussions), trying to stage a coup in a City State, instituting counter-intelligence measures in your own cities, etc.

However, perhaps the coolest part of espionage is when your spy informs you that a nation is planning a sneak attack on another nation. You can then inform the third-party nation to warn them of the impending attack (improving your diplomatic standing with that nation) or do nothing and take advantage of the situation.

Third, Civ V, when originally released, featured some bizarre actions by the AI. Nations that were friendly towards you on one turn could very well denounce you three turns later- for no apparent reason- and then refuse to trade with you. Compounding these unusual actions was the fact that Civ V provided no feedback or rationale as to why a given leader liked or disliked you.

With Civ V: Gods & Kings, you will notice significantly improved AI; it is not perfect, but it is a lot better than it was in the base game. For one thing, the interface now tells you exactly the reasons for why a leader is friendly or hostile towards you (a la Civ IV). In general, the AI is more consistent now; I have not seen any instances of schizophrenic behavior that sometimes plagued the original Civ V.

What this means is that you will see much more realistic and more predictable behavior by AI nations. Now, as you get in the middle and later parts of the game, you will see natural alliances begin to develop between you and the nations you are friendly with, and you will even see nations that are hostile towards you begin to form alliances among themselves.

There are some other enhancements in the Gods & Kings expansion worth mentioning. Beyond giving us new units, new buildings, and new wonders, the City State mechanic has also been improved. You can still give City States gold to influence them, but now they frequently give diverse "quests" to improve your standing.

Finally, it is interesting to note that beyond adding religion and espionage and the new units/buildings/wonders, the designers also tinkered a bit with the basic rules of Civ V. A few brief examples- units now have more "hit points"; this means that units are rarely defeated in a single round of combat, meaning that they can be rotated in and out of a battle, adding to tactical complexity. Civ V veterans who are used to bringing 2 swordsman and 2 catapults to capture a city are going to have to throw away their old strategies; cities now require a significant number of units to defeat (adding to the game's realism, in my opinion). In general, the designers closed a lot of "loopholes" that existed in the original game, and I think the game is better for it.

In summary, Civ V: Gods & Kings turns Civ V from a very good Civilization game into a great Civilization game. With the expansion, I would rate Civ V as the best Civ game yet. I wholeheartedly recommend it to those who enjoyed the original Civ V, and I hope it leads to at least some of the Civ V critics to give the game a fresh look.
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77 of 86 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And just that easily, the game becomes playable!, June 19, 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
I wasn't overly impressed with Civ 5 when it first came out. I was so unimpressed, in fact, that for the last year or so I've ignored it and been playing Civ IV. There were a lot of things I didn't like about 5, like the lack of religion and espionage, the no-unit-stacking policy, the limited number of civs, the strangeness of the naval units and, frankly, I didn't get why everyone went so mad over the idea of the hex grid. I always found it rather annoying.

Thankfully while the hex grids and no stacking remain, this expansion adds in more civilizations, more city-states (for them as likes those), more naval units, espionage and religion! And boy, let me tell you about the religion options. They are astounding. First off, you get to adopt a pantheon fairly early in the game, which adds some minor bonuses. But then, once you have a great prophet, you can found an actual religion. There's all the ones from IV, plus ones like Zoroastrianism and Sikhism, as well as Tengriism, which sent me to Wikipedia, since I'd never heard of it before (though my guess on what it might have been was correct. Hooray!).

The diplomacy options have also expanded significantly. Now you can establish embassies in other countries, which gives you the location of their capitol and allows for other diplomatic niceties. You can also, if you are playing the Austrians, buy city-states, which is remarkably useful. There's also a large number of scenarios, including a steampunk one that I look forward to playing.

Now like I said, not all the "problems" I have with the game are fixed. But that said, I find that I enjoy the game much, much more with these features added and it might, finally, be time for me to retire from Civ IV.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally, they get it (almost) right, July 1, 2012
By 
Rich H. (Warren, MI USA) - See all my reviews
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is as much a reinvention of Civilization V as it is an expansion pack. And that is a very, very good thing.

Let's face it: what is now the base Civ 5 is a mediocre shadow of its predecessors. It's prettier, but on just about every other level it falls short, to the point where I found myself dropping out of games from sheer boredom. As a rabid Civ fan from day one (and I'm talking the 1991 original, on a Commodore Amiga no less) this was downright heartbreaking. Judging from the hundreds of scathing Amazon reviews and who-knows-how-many thousands of fan forum posts, I was not alone in this sentiment.

I am therefore delighted to report that it appears the people at Firaxis and 2K have been listening. In a single stroke, the Gods and Kings expansion pack has made this game interesting and - dare I say it? - FUN once again.

Good: Gameplay has received a badly-needed overhaul. Without going into excruciating detail (which can be had with a google or two,) many of the features that were dropped from V are back, more sophisticated and useful than ever. In particular, religion and espionage are back, much more an integral part of the game than they were in IV. We have new units, buildings, wonders, technologies, and leaders, and the characteristics and interactions of both old and new items make a LOT more sense than they did before - the game now has a gestalt that was completely lacking in the base, making play smoother and more intuitive. The city-states are now worthwhile allies instead of minor annoyances. Naval operations are a whole lot more interesting; island maps are actually fun now. There appear to be some improvements under the hood as well: response seems a little crisper, they've cleaned up the startup somewhat, and the graphics have been tidied up a little. Also, GIANT DEATH ROBOTS!!

Bad: It's still slow. I haven't played on my favored large or huge maps yet, but I don't expect much beyond the marginal playability of the base game with these sizes. If you're not running a high-end gaming PC, expect some serious lag in the late stages of a game. It's still hidebound by the Steam client - why oh why did they inflict that on this game!? - but the two do seem to be better integrated this time around. I still have to fight the playfield during a turn to scroll to where I want to look instead of where the game thinks I should be looking. There are a few gameplay aspects I don't care for - the espionage mechanism is weird, and Great People generally can't fire off Golden Ages anymore - but these are near-nitpicks in light of the tremendous gains elsewhere. Plus, the long-promised pitboss server is still missing. It's a pity, because I suspect that multiplayer performance would see a huge boost with Steam out of the way.

Ugly: Having to lay out another $30 to get the game Civ V should have been in the first place.

On the whole, however, it's worth it to have a fun, challenging Civilization game once again. Five stars, barely - the ongoing performance shortfall and missing Pitboss almost cost it that 5th.

* UPDATE (7/4/12) * Be sure you have ALL available Windows and Java updates in place before installing G&K. A friend of mine ran into severe multiplayer performance problems on a pre-service pack 1 Windows 7 machine.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Better, but still behind Civ IV., August 26, 2012
By 
H. N. T. (Los Angeles, CA United States) - See all my reviews
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
I loved Civilization from the first game. I even tried Call to Power, but couldn't do it.

Civ 5 clearly simplified too much, I must assume they wanted to increase the pontential number of players, but I don't see how the regular Civ 5 could please anyone.
So now the idea is to introduce again Religion and Espionage into the game and (hopefully) some added complexity to the game. It does succeed at that, but at a much smaller level than the previous success of Civilization IV.

Religion was made into an interesting innovation; you basically tailor your religion to your strategy by choosing which benefits it confers. For example you can receive benefits for having the religion spread into different civilizations, or simply by the number of cities (your or others) affected, or the ability to buy building with the new faith points. Pretty neat, and since a particular benefit can be interesting there is a sort of a race if two civilizations want to pursue the same strategy.
The downside is that once the religions are established, there is little gameplay with them. So they change the game from the beginning to say... 500 AD. By them mostly everyone will have a religion picked out. It was a fine addition, but it mostly changed the early game in a relatively minor way.

Espionage is the big let down. It begins in the Renaissance (it is as if the game knew religion would be mostly played out by then) and you get one spy to try to steal tech or influence city-states. Far too little gameplay and involvement, the spy doesn't exist on the map and it all happens in the "Espionage screen". It is a cheap add on that does nothing to the game and is absurdly limited. You get one new spy per age, so you can't move resources into more spies because basically they have very little to actually do.
The greatest success is actually naval combat. Now you have long range and melee ships, and you can attack cities more effectively with a navy. Naval combat was drastically improved with this.
The new civs are irrelevant to me. I don't care about new luxury items. The foreign policy is very mildly different for city states, but the original one was practically broken, so I see this more as a patch than an effective expansion of the game.

So this expansion is ok, but not worth the price. It improves mildly Civ5, but it still is incredibly inferior to Civ4 in every way but graphics.
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41 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Worthwhile Expansion., June 19, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Sid Meier's Civilization V: Gods and Kings [Online Game Code] (Software Download)
Here we are at Civilization V's first expansion after only seeing smaller DLC packs since it's launch over a year ago. This expansion actually does what expansion packs are supposed to do, and that is add on content to keep the game fresh, fix bugs and gameplay issues and give you a reason to spend more money on a game you already have. And it does it quite well.

Civilization V Gods and Kings includes the addition of Religion as well as Espionage as we have seen in earlier instalments in the franchise, but does so in a completely new and innovative way that we have not yet seen. These additions included in this way allow you as the player to experience a copious amount of new content through two completely new major gameplay features, and while they seem familiar and are easy to learn they are fundamentally different than the earlier versions thus exciting and fresh. I won't go into anymore detail as they are listed on the page and I don't want to ruin any of the "exciting and fresh" but that is what I found them to be. But these two features dramatically change the game, and personally added a lot of much needed replayability to the "vanilla" version of the game.

There are several new leaders to be played all heads of their respective civilizations and with that all new leader bonuses and special units. This of course adds a lot more variety to the game (I.E. replayability) as well as variety in abilities and units that you or your opponents (or allies technically) have thus in turn possibly changing your strategy around. These new additions simply add base depth to the game, and fortunately allow a lot of players favorite Civ's/Leaders from previous games to make appearances. And of course some of the new leaders special traits involve bonuses in the new Religion/Faith system.

There were several new maps and scenarios added in this expansion pack, these features are also just added depth and variety. New artwork/Units/moves/abilities, ect. As well.

All in all this expansion pack does what it is supposed to do, or atleast what I had hoped it would do and that is expand on the game, adding new features as well as variety and making the game more enjoyable and most importantly more replayable. Civilization V Gods and Kings for its cost adds a lot of content and doesn't seem to break anything or have a downside game wise, so if you are wondering whether it's worth it as a long time Sid Meier fan as well as just a Civilization fan I find this expansion to be a welcome addition.

Original Civ V rating 4/5, a slight dissapointment considering the earlier instalments and not as enjoyable as the fourth game. Though it was pretty good considering other games on the market.
Civilization V with Gods and Kings 5/5, this expansion fills a lot of gameplay holes, adds a lot of variety and makes the game overall a more enjoyable experience. I find myself not simply running out of things to do to stay entertained with these new strategies and ways to go about the game.

If you enjoyed Civilization V, or feel you would have if it had a little more work done with it and had some expanded gameplay features then this product is definitely a recommendation.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Worthwhile Expansion., June 19, 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Here we are at Civilization V's first expansion after only seeing smaller DLC packs since it's launch over a year ago. This expansion actually does what expansion packs are supposed to do, and that is add on content to keep the game fresh, fix bugs and gameplay issues and give you a reason to spend more money on a game you already have. And it does it quite well.

Civilization V Gods and Kings includes the addition of Religion as well as Espionage as we have seen in earlier instalments in the franchise, but does so in a completely new and innovative way that we have not yet seen. These additions included in this way allow you as the player to experience a copious amount of new content through two completely new major gameplay features, and while they seem familiar and are easy to learn they are fundamentally different than the earlier versions thus exciting and fresh. I won't go into anymore detail as they are listed on the page and I don't want to ruin any of the "exciting and fresh" but that is what I found them to be. But these two features dramatically change the game, and personally added a lot of much needed replayability to the "vanilla" version of the game.

There are several new leaders to be played all heads of their respective civilizations and with that all new leader bonuses and special units. This of course adds a lot more variety to the game (I.E. replayability) as well as variety in abilities and units that you or your opponents (or allies technically) have thus in turn possibly changing your strategy around. These new additions simply add base depth to the game, and fortunately allow a lot of players favorite Civ's/Leaders from previous games to make appearances. And of course some of the new leaders special traits involve bonuses in the new Religion/Faith system.

There were several new maps and scenarios added in this expansion pack, these features are also just added depth and variety. New artwork/Units/moves/abilities, ect. As well.

All in all this expansion pack does what it is supposed to do, or atleast what I had hoped it would do and that is expand on the game, adding new features as well as variety and making the game more enjoyable and most importantly more replayable. Civilization V Gods and Kings for its cost adds a lot of content and doesn't seem to break anything or have a downside game wise, so if you are wondering whether it's worth it as a long time Sid Meier fan as well as just a Civilization fan I find this expansion to be a welcome addition.

Original Civ V rating 4/5, a slight dissapointment considering the earlier instalments and not as enjoyable as the fourth game. Though it was pretty good considering other games on the market.
Civilization V with Gods and Kings 5/5, this expansion fills a lot of gameplay holes, adds a lot of variety and makes the game overall a more enjoyable experience. I find myself not simply running out of things to do to stay entertained with these new strategies and ways to go about the game.

If you enjoyed Civilization V, or feel you would have if it had a little more work done with it and had some expanded gameplay features then this product is definitely a recommendation.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Significant Improvement to game. Multiple "synergies" can be had, November 21, 2012
This review is from: Sid Meier's Civilization V: Gods and Kings [Online Game Code] (Software Download)
Ostensibly, the "faith" meter in Gods and Kings is just like the "culture" meter in that it is another meter that you watch fill up before showering your civilization with goodies that mainly affect the domestic economy and accumulation of gold, culture, and happiness.

What it does though is enable synergies and an exponential amount of strategies. It also greatly affects the entire playthrough of the game.

For instance, let's say that you want to grab land quickly and so choose the liberty tree with its free settler. The weakness of this is that you end up short on food and culture and happiness. Well, you can choose traits that enhance the food, culture, and happiness, and so alieviate this shortcoming.

Or, you want a small traditional kingdom. They do okay in the short term, but mid-game a lack of territory will see you falling behind. But if you choose a religion that gives you gold for every foreign city that converts to your religion, then you can have your little kingdom while conquering the world with your religion and becoming rich in the process.

Or you can go the secular route. The new faith additions require lots of buildings and you can eschew this for an advantage over your opponents.

There are many more combinations that are possible. It effectively makes for many different paths of victory to try out. The original game, I felt, had only a few paths to victory, and so this is a big improvement.

There are other gameplay enhancements. Hit points are now 100. This is important because previously, all attacks did a minimum of 1/10 damage. So you could take down a powerful tank with 10 attacks from piddling archers. Ships are divided between melee and range. This makes a navy worthwhile. Previous civ games saw me making zero ships, since land units were the only ones that really mattered since Civ is all about cities.

Now, ships can capture cities. They can capture other ships.

This alone makes civilizations like England viable, unlike the original game. England receives a +2 movement bonus for ships. Since ships were nearly useless in the original game, and at best were geographically limited artillery units, England's +2 movement was a waste. But now, England can threaten any coastal city in the world.

AND, simultaneously, this makes the commerce culture tree much more useful since commerce has a handy little talent that gives you +3 production in coastal cities.

There have been some tweaks to the tech tree and new civilizations too. They seem interesting and I've yet to figure them all out.

All in all, if you are a civilization V player, this is an essential purchase. It makes the game much much better, for what it is.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Breathes new playability into Civ V., July 28, 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
As I do with all versions of Civilization, including the "lateral" versions such as "Alpha Centauri" and the non-Sid Meier version (I forget its name), I play it until the cows come home, for weeks and weeks. It simply does not loose its power to entrance. However, there does come a time in every version where parts of the game start to wear thin, such as when you outstrip all the AI opponents in tech and wonders acquisition (I always play on a relatively easy level) and its a matter of waiting until you can reach a culture or diplomatic victory. Both primary additions in this expansion add good interest to the middle of the game, with religion adding another dimension to early game strategy and country selection (Byzantines and Celts are especially good if you want to make the most of religion.) Diplomancy adds interest to the middle of the game, since it doesn't kick in until you reach the Renaissance, which is just about the time religion starts to lose its lustre.

As many people have noted, the religion addition is far, far better than the religion aspect of Civ III and Civ IV. It adds a new dimension and especially a new resource to enhance your quest for culture, productivity, money, and happiness, plus the new commodity, faith. If I had any regrets about the religion addition, it is that there is no bit reward, like a new victory condition, for succeeding in spreading one's religion. The only drawback of such a victory condition is that to be realistic, it would probably peak early in the Industrial age, and one would lose about half the game narrative. Well, one could make it difficult, with perhaps a 1 in 10 chance of attaining it before the advent of the Modern Age. Even if not a win, then maybe a big boost in culture.

The diplomacy addition is a neat addition, but it is less engaging than the religion addition. Like the religion addition, it puts a premium on getting a really fast start, to be the first to reach the Renaissance, when you get your first spy, and when you can start building spy deterrents such as constabularies early in the game. Both additions add annoyances which tend to spoil things if you like to "win big". It seems virtually impossible to prevent one of your competitors from stealing at least one technology, and short of going to war with an opponent, it seems almost impossible to keep an opponent from converting one of your cities. While stealing techs is reasonable, it seems entirely unlikely that by missionary efforts alone, one could convert a major city from one religion to another. It's like imagining Billy Graham would go to Medina and convert it from Islam to Baptist Christianity.

Combat units have been improved in several ways. I'm especially happy with the set of combat units which bridge the gap between the Civil War and WW II, such as the Gatling gun, Great War Infantry, Great War Bomber, Triplane, and Land Ship (early WW I tanks.) Defence seems to have been strengthened for the early game, but there is still a huge jump in advantage to the offense with the advent of artillery, the bomber, and the battleship, when attacking indirect fire units can stand off and damage a target, whiile remaining out of range (except for the bomber). Possibly the greatest single improvement in unit capabilities is the ability for sea units to attack and capture coastal cities. Oddly, while this capability may have been more common in ancient times, in the game time, it is easier after the arrival of privateers. (I just wish they would have kept the clever ruse of making the nationaltiy of privateers unknown, as long as you were only doing ship to ship combat.

Regarding diplomacy, I am still annoyed with how an AI country can denounce you and turn from friend to hostile for no apparent reason. There are simply no provocations apparent, except perhaps national character. The Aztecs and Alexander the Great, for example, seem to do it far more often than the relatively peaceful Arabians. But even Ghandi can get erratic and turn against you for no clear reason.

The designers seem to have made a point of coming close to parity between male and female leaders. There are several female leaders of civilizations where there are more prominant male leaders one could have chosen, such as Dido of Carthage in place of Hannibal and Maria Theresa in place of Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria. On the other hand, it is quite true that Isabella may have been the strongest Spanish leader, even stronger than her husband, Ferdinand. I do miss some of the more colorful leaders from earlier versions, such as Winston Churchill for England, Abraham Lincoln for the US, and Fredrick the Great for Germany.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Much better than Civ 5 but still not as good as Civ 4, July 13, 2012
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This expansion pack has definetly improved the game. But the question is why did us loyal Civ fans have to wait another 1.5 years and pay another $30 for the game finally to be improved? Civ 5 should have been like this from day one. People who haven't played any other civ games will really enjoy this game and probably won't even notice or miss any of the cool stuff that is still missing from Civ IV. I still feel like Civ 5 is dumped down version of Civ 4. Civ 5 still lacks a lot of the micro managing and extra features Civ 4. Ofcourse I didn't expect an expansion pack to fix Civ 5 completely. Another issue with gods and kings is that it doesn't include any of the previously released dlc for Civ 5. So someone unlike me who has already purchased the dlc would have purchase all the dlc and the expansion pack to get all the civilizations.

There are number good things and equally or more bad things about gods and kings. Good things: more units, more civs, more wonders, more city improvements. New game concepts like how a meele naval unit can now occupy a city without a ground unit isa great addition. Another one where naval units are now stackable on top of ground units in the sea for extra protection.

Bad things: Religion and spies are a great addition-finally! I personally preferred the way spies were managed and used in Civ 4. In gods and kings the only way to get a spy is when you enter a new era. There is a limit to how many spies you can have I think it's 6 or 7 something like that. Also you can station the spy in one of your cities, another civ or another city state. I just find thind the control very limited and tedious. I also found the stealing technology concept annoying. Enemy civilizations constantly stealing tech even though I have done all that I can to stop them like station spies in my cities and buld numerous improvements and wonders. Religion I'm glad they added it also but again I missed they it was in civ 4. One thing that annoyed me right away was enemy civs converting and spreading religion in my cities and there was no way to stop it. The only thing I could do was reconvert my cities. I also wish there was a way to win a religious victory. The great people abilities have changed in gods and kings. For example in civ 5 all great people had the ability to to cause a golden age. In gods and kings only the great artist can trigger a golden age. Also in civ 5 the great artist could be used to create a culture bomb which was one my favorite features of civ 5. There is no great person that can create a culture bomb in gods and kings. But the great general can create a citadel which does expand borders and can be used to kind of substitute for the culture bomb. The citadel does take up the tile improvement is suppose to be used more for defense from military stand point of view.

One thing I really miss from previous civilizations is the victory screen when you make it to alpha centauri. In gods and kings and civ 5 you don't even have to wait until your ship makes it to alpha centauri. Basically as soon as your spaceship is built you've won it.

In the end I'm happy we got this expansion pack but there is room for improvement. I guess we will have to wait another 1.5 years for the next expansion pack. Hopefully it will be based more other components like science, better AI, improved religion, improved spies, improved game concepts maybe bring more stuff in from civ 4 and make it like the beyond the sword expansion pack for civ 4.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gods and Kings expansion pack for Civ V, July 12, 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
At last, the Gods and Kings expansion pack makes Civ V a worthy successor to Civ IV and all earlier installments of the Civilization series. For anyone already having Civ V or considering puchasing Civ V for the first time, the Gods and Kings expansion is a must have.

First off, my PC far exceeded the minimum specifications recommended to play Civ V, however, as I got further into the game my video would always suddenly freeze up or would go to a black blank screen and the only way to recover was by using the task manager to close down the game and restart. This happened when running DirectX 11. When running the game in DirectX 9, video artifacts would start appearing later in the game. Once I installed Gods and Kings, the game has been running smoothly and flawlessly with no issues whatsoever. So whatever issues Civ V had with my PC, Gods and Kings corrected it.

As I had already touched on, Gods and Kings is everything that Civ V should had been from the start. Bringing back to the series Religion and espionage truly improves interest in the game as well as being able to come up with different strategies or influence changes in strategies as the game progresses. The new civilizations, wonders, buildings, technologies and military units with increased chance of survival in combat, have, all told, just made Civ V a much more enjoyable and challenging game to play. Of the many new military units I particularly like the addition of the gatling gun and machine gun. I would had liked to have seen the addition of a troop transport ship....perhaps someday down the road?

For those who had bought Civ V, played it and found themselves going back to play Civ IV out of frustration or in disgust of Civ V, get this expansion, I'm sure Civ IV will go back in retirement in favor of Civ V. Everything that was good about Civ IV is back and the additions and changes in my opinion are all for the better. I have been playing Civilization since the beginning and own every game in the series and feel this is definately the best.
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