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Siddhartha Paperback – June 7, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 110 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Brown (June 7, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1613820836
  • ISBN-13: 978-1613820834
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #882,878 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"No living English-speaking actor outshines Derek Jacobi, nor any audiobook reader for that matter. He sings, rather than speaks, with extraordinary lyricism, expressiveness and depth...Jacobi approached the text with a direct, childlike fervor. He brings home the subtleties of Siddhartha's inner journey with amazing clarity and resonance, which he makes more exciting than the most thrilling thriller." --AudioFile, October/November 1998

"Filled with timeless truths and told so beautifully with images that burn deep into your being, Hesse's novel speaks powerfully to every generation of spiritual seekers. . . . A fresh translation of Siddhartha that offers greater authenticity than any other translation—while still preserving the unique beauty of the original prose."— Branches of Light --branchs of light --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Hermann Hesse was born in 1877 in Calw, Germany. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946. He is the author of Steppenwolf, Narcissus and Goldmund, Journey to the East, The Glass Bead Game, and many other books.

Sherab Chödzin Kohn has translated numerous books of spiritual and psychological interest from German and other European languages. He was a close student of Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa and is the author of The Awakened One: A Life of the Buddha. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


More About the Author

Hermann Hesse (1877-1962) was born in Germany and later became a citizen of Switzerland. As a Western man profoundly affected by the mysticism of Eastern thought, he wrote many novels, stories, and essays that bear a vital spiritual force that has captured the imagination and loyalty of many generations of readers. In 1946, he won the Nobel Prize for Literature for The Glass Bead Game.

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Customer Reviews

The story is wonderful, captivating, easy to read!
Robert S. Oberland
I'd recommend this book to anyone with an interest in Siddhartha, Buddhism, or spirituality in general.
Book Nympho
It makes me wonder if the translation is bad also, since I don't have another version to compare it to.
Grace B.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Grace B. on January 18, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is nothing wrong with the original, however this version, published by Simon & Brown, is full of typos and mispellings. For instance, the word "the" will be written twice in a row, or the word "nit" instead of "not." It makes me wonder if the translation is bad also, since I don't have another version to compare it to.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Guy on February 5, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
By all means, buy the book, it's incredible, but don't buy this one. Hesse's words and W.K. Marriott's classic translation are butchered in this Simon & Brown printing -- "if" for "of", "nit" for "not", "heard" instead of "head" -- all in one paragraph. Yeesh.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David D. Metcalf on February 20, 2013
Format: Paperback
Siddhartha is the eponymous tale of a Nepali man's journey to spiritual "enlightenment"--if that is what you wish to call it-for what Siddhartha attained is beyond conception and language. The beginning of the book captures the default mental state of man: restlessness. This restlessness derives from our need for existential consequence--an explanation for being--and a good one at that. To see what would meaning would suffice, one need only look to the artful contrivances of conventional religion. We want a purpose to our life, and a death that does not nullify it.

But when the mind strips all idealisms of their all too convenient ideals, as secular western culture has, man becomes no more than the bastard son of a cosmos deaf to--as Shakespeare famously said--our "bootless cries" for a purposeful explanation of our birth. For an existence wanting an objective absolute, man is simply insufficient to answer that question--the only question-- and thereby fill the intrinsic void of the human condition. We attempt to medicate that void with various existential salves - religion, drugs, hobbies, jobs, romance. But all such resorts touch the symptoms of the disease: the selfish longing. The self--with the mind as its principal agent--prevents recognition of the emptiness and apprehension of its import.

So is all empty? Not in the sense the cynic supposes. Is there a reality, an immaterial divine that eludes material cognition? Siddhartha supposes. He cedes that nothing in material existence can give us happiness or peace, as we are afflicted by the intuition that "I am not enough." Siddhartha feels the tasking pangs of this longing.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By William C. Sain on October 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
My first experience with Hermann Hesse came in the fall of 2005 when I took Anthropology of Religion in my senior year at Texas A&M. We read an excerpt from The Glass Bead Game and I was deeply moved by the beauty of Hesse's writing, as were many people, thus earning him the Nobel Prize in 1946.

I don't remember when or where I purchased Siddhartha, but the appeal of the story of a spiritual journey and my desire to read more of Hesse's works were too tempting to deny. That being said, I don't know why I've held onto the book for so long without reading it, especially since it is not a very long novel.

Siddhartha is beautifully written and mirrors my own spiritual journey. I am of a different faith than the characters in the book, but that is irrelevant to my appreciation of the story. There is much wisdom in the story, and "Wisdom," Siddhartha says, "is not communicable." A wise statement, yes, which then makes it foolish.

Wisdom is communicable, but not always through pedagogical language. It is communicated through the sound of a river, a life lived, or a story. This book is a book of wisdom and it must be read carefully and reflectively to be received.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard Y. on July 12, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This review is for the version of Siddhartha translated by W. K. Marriott and published in 2013. I have read "Siddhartha" by one translator or another every year starting in 1978 (it is now 2014). I try to find new translations hoping that it will stimulate my reading of the book. In recent years, there have been many. This one, however, as other reviewers has stated, has so many typos that it difficult to read - especially if this is your first try. Do NOT read this translation first. The New Directions translation, the only one available for many years, is not exactly in modern English, but it beats the heck out of this version.

I DO, however, strongly recommend reading a decent version of the novel. One of Hesse's best (and I've read them all).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Togar on November 30, 2012
Format: Paperback
Siddhartha is a very personal story of one man's quest for peace and understanding, not Hesse's scripture or a re-telling of the Buddha's life. Hesse's Siddhartha is a sincere, intelligent, thoughtful, yet deeply flawed character (as most great characters in fiction are). This is a novel, a work of fiction, but unfortunately seems to be confused for a self-help manual.

I am not a believer in eastern traditions or religions, yet enjoyed Siddhartha as a piece of literature and as a insightful look into the complexity of mankind and our relationship with the world around us.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ashley on October 4, 2012
Format: Paperback
If you are looking for a book that will make you inexplicably sad and outrageously happy, filled with longing and in the tender wings of love, and will leave a completely everlasting impression, Siddhartha is definately the book for you.

The story follows a man named Siddhatha on his search for fullfillment. Although the book undoubtedly has some Buddhist over tones, this is surely a quest that every individual is on at some point in his or her life. This classic novel is one that everyone should read, because given the chance, it is universally connectable.
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