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54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Almost perfect lens
The sigma 30mm f2.8 is a compact lens designed for a future compact mirrorless by sigma, but has been ported to m4/3rds and the nex mount. The 30mm translates to 45mm in 35mm terms, which gives us an almost normal focal length. Along with the 19mm, Sigma has created the first third party autofocus primes for mirrorless systems. Neat! The lens is compact in size (about the...
Published on July 10, 2012 by Austin

versus
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't quite have useful niche, but good
I bought this based on reviews of good quality image, which it has. But it does not have any special quality in which it would be my go-to lens. It is smaller than 18-55 kit, but not a pancake. It is 1 to 1 1/2 stop faster than the kit at 30mm, but since there is no image stabilization, you lose that by needing a faster shutter speed (maybe more, based on your ability...
Published 12 months ago by D. H Mark


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54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Almost perfect lens, July 10, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Sigma 30mm F2.8 EX DN- Sony E 330965 (Electronics)
The sigma 30mm f2.8 is a compact lens designed for a future compact mirrorless by sigma, but has been ported to m4/3rds and the nex mount. The 30mm translates to 45mm in 35mm terms, which gives us an almost normal focal length. Along with the 19mm, Sigma has created the first third party autofocus primes for mirrorless systems. Neat! The lens is compact in size (about the size of my 50mm 1.7 Minolta AF lens), and the front element is VERY small. The back element is large, allowing for a small design with minimal distortion and good coverage across the frame. The most important features of this lens are the focal length, and size. 50mm is often the most desired focal length in a system, which is 35mm in APS-C terms. Since the NEX system has large amounts of adaptable glass, this would seemingly be non-issue. But 35mm lenses are large for film cameras, due to retrofocus designs. Often the adapter and 35mm lens combination would leave you with a very long lens, and fast aperture (as in f2) 35mm lenses are even bigger. The only convenient options in terms of size available until this lens were the 35mm f1.7 CCTV lens (which has unbearable corner performance and vignetting, though a good lens if used stopped down marginally and centralized composition), the Contax G 35mm f2 (hard to come by, and the adapters are expensive, and lastly the Voigtlander 35mm 1.4 (very good lens, small with great construction, but expensive). So this lens represents something pretty significant, especially considering the autofocus capabilities.

Sharpness:
The sharpness of this lens is unreal. Bar none. On MTF curves for the Nex 7, it beats out Leica lenses (scored in the 1000's wide open in center, and high 900's stopped down in corners). This is the sharpest lens you will put on your NEX, bar none. And that's from wide open. The lens has maximum sharpness at 5.6, but hardly improves over being used wide open. That means you pretty much only stop down to gain DOF. For this reason alone, I highly recommend this lens. Being a normal focal length and having this sharpness, you get a compact walk-around kit capable of anything from portraiture to landscapes.

Focus speed:
The focus speed of this lens is pretty quick. Though it uses CDAF, I had no problems with speed on my Nex 5, performance should be better on a 5n or 7. The focusing speed was not as quick as my 16mm, but probably rivals the 18-55 kit lens. This will not be as fast as Phase Detection, but it is quick enough for what I need. No complaints here, not something I would use for sports or candid moments, but that isn't what I shoot anyways. The only fault for focusing is while using facial recognition, sometimes the focus will not be correct. I have only encountered misfocusing while using facial detection. So either turn that off, or make use of the excellent DMF built in, which will zoom in on the face with a turn of the ring, and allow precision focusing.

Build Quality:
The build quality is good. It uses a metal mount, but unlike the Sony lenses it is made of hard plastic as opposed to aluminum. That's not to complain, because it's durable plastic. The focus ring is well dampened, and I have had no problems with the focus-by-wire design. It also supports DMF (direct manual focusing) as do all native Nex lenses, which is great. This isn't a lens I would worry about taking anywhere.

Pricing:
Can be had new for $200, used for a little less. If you want a normal equivalent prime for every day, and not dying for fast aperture, buy this immediately. If you want a fast aperture lens, buy this and then spend $40 on a 35mm CCTV fujian lens, as that will cover everything this doesn't at this focal length.

Some side notes:
Fringing is extremely well controlled. Wide open it is practically non-existent, and of course goes away as you stop down. Flaring is also not an issue due to the small front element. If the sun is in the shot, it will not do much to the image at all. It does provide a green flare, as opposed to a red style ala Canon. I would try and avoid purposeful flare, because it isn't attractive looking at any aperture because of the color signature of the flare. The color signature of this lens is great, and is of other Sony/Minolta lenses. You will have more blue/purple as opposed to hard reds and greens from Canon. Minimum focus distance is nice, not replacing a macro but much closer than the 16mm. You can get some nice close ups with this lens. Bokeh is decent, not very smooth but not at all distracting. The aperture blades are rounded as well, a nice touch especially for price range. Vignetting is minimal. Optically I cannot fault this lens. Some might complain that the aperture isn't very fast, but you should buy this lens not trying to get a narrow DoF. This is a multi-purpose lens, and 30mm is not a focal length which will have shallow DoF regardless of aperture. If you are dying for shallow DoF use a longer, faster adapted lens. Wide open performance of this lens is perfect, vignetting is very minimal, and you can achieve narrow DoF depending on distance from subject, just don't go expecting to make a bopie with this lens (as in you can always get background bokeh, but don't expect foreground bokeh. If you are DYING for a fast aperture 50mm equiv, buy the Mitakon 35mm f0.95 [...] and receive few of the things that make this lens special.

The only faults I would attribute to this lens are the 46mm filter ring (the standard for MFT, but NEX uses 49mm. Just buy a step up ring and new cap, should set you back $5 at most), and the lens slows the operation of the camera. For whatever reason, start up time and switching from image review to shooting are slower with this lens attached. I have tested this against adapted lenses and my 16mm, and the operation of those features are much longer with this lens. Why? I have no idea, but it is worth noting. This means you can lose the moment from doing image review. I suggest turning auto review off (because you can pretty much see what the picture will look like anyways due to EVF), and not reviewing images often. It is a VERY glaring error, but one that can be overlooked in favor of the pros of the lens, which are abundant. It also doesn't have any sort of stabilization so it's not ideal for video, but that would add to price and size so it's not the end of the world. Though shaky video is pretty easy to correct, detail will be lost that way. If shooting video try and use a tripod, or wait for the 16-50mm G zoom by Sony in a couple months.

Oh did I mention this lens is $200, and the sharpest lens for E mount? Sold.
Pros:
-sharpest lens for the E mount
-$200. So cheap, and yet an EXCELLENT performer
-small front element prevents flare or accidental damage
-compact size brings nex to near pocketable status, it's not the 16mm but close.
-overall performance is incredible, and will beat practically any 35mm lens you can put on the camera
-plastic construction appears to be durable
-it's $200, and beats leica lenses in sheer sharpness.

Cons:
-46mm filter size
-slows some of cameras operations.

Kind of cons?:
-2.8 aperture
-No stabilization

Overall the only real con of the lens is the slower operation. While a 49mm would be nice, maybe an f2, and stabilization, they would add to the size and expense of this lens, compromising some of the best things about it. If you learn to use this lens, you will love it, and that's it. You won't think about wishing it was faster, because at f2.8 it's sharper than any other lens at f2.8, and your camera will be small and portable. The only thing that will irk you is operation time, depending on what you shoot. Chances are there will be times you miss a moment due to this. But the images you do capture, will be some of the best rendered photographs you could make with this system.

Update:
I purchased a step up ring for this camera, 46mm to 49mm. the cap still fits the 49mm without falling off, sweet!
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66 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential for serious photographers with NEX cameras, April 22, 2012
By 
This review is from: Sigma 30mm F2.8 EX DN- Sony E 330965 (Electronics)
Sony has made some brilliant cameras with its NEX line. They are small, light and produce great images. The problem is that there is only one small and light Sony lens for the cameras, and it's not in a general purpose focal length. Panasonic, Olympus and Samsung all produce small fixed focal length lenses and they sell well. Sony hasn't. My guess is that the video people designed the lens line, not still photographers, which leaves the NEX cameras lacking compared to other small, interchangeable lens camera makers. Enter Sigma. This lens isn't quite pancake small, but it is compact and very light. It is optically better than any Sony NEX lens except the 1.8 50mm and the 1.4 24mm, both of which cost many times as much. In the case of the 24mm Zeiss designed lens that's $900 more. Ouch.

The 30mm Sigma works out to 45mm equivalent for a full frame/film lens, which is pretty darn close to the standard 50mm lens that many film photographers got on their cameras. It's a very versatile focal length, versatile enough that this lens can be left on the camera much of the time. It makes my NEX-5N into a great street photography camera. And did I mention that it is sharp across the frame, with good color and contrast. At f/2.8, it's pretty fast, much more usable than the kit lens for low light photos. The existence of this lens actually convinced me to go with Sony rather than micro four-thirds.

All is not perfect. Nothing is. The lens seems to slow the camera start up time. It doesn't appear to be ultra-durable, though no NEX lenses do. That's the price of the the light weight. No complaints. Nobody will mistake this for an expensive lens, build quality is adequate and so is the finish, nothing more.

In absolute terms, I'd guess this is a 4 star lens. But for $200, it's a great bargain and compliments the NEX cameras. Actually, it makes the NEX line much more attractive for street photography.
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42 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars sharp lens - great for m4/3, April 6, 2012
After making a complete switch from 4/3 to m4/3, the 14-42mk2 kit lens, though very good, just wasn't doing much for my creativity.

A lot of m4/3 users will say that the Panasonic 20/1.7 is a must-have and similarly, the Olympus 45/1.8 is also a must-have, however, the former is too wide and the latter is too long. Though a 'normal' lens would have been good, there aren't many 'normal' 25mm options for m4/3 that were within my budget.

Luckily, the Sigma 30/2.8 is available and it meets my needs. It's sharp and focuses very quickly. It's small enough (not small like a pancake lens, but it's just right) and still keeps my EPL1 down to a compact size.

As with any Sigma lens (I've owned two for 4/3 before), there are a few quirks:
- The new 'linear' focusing mechanism is fast, but when the camera is not on or if it's not mounted, it shakes around. I don't know what this means in terms of durability, but the lens has a 3-year warranty. We'll find out, eh?
- The aperture blades stop down automatically when in bright environments, but will return to what you set it to when capturing.
- The front element is quite small, but the rear element is about twice the size. Kind of weird, but not an issue.

All in all, I like the lens. The 60mm EFL is usable for me, but it's not for everyone. I like it since it's close enough to my favorite lens, the Zuiko Digital 35/3.5 macro, which I'm still using on my m4/3 kit with an adapter.

Sure, it's not 'fast' like the 20/1.7, but if the room is dark enough, I'll use a flash or put the camera away. Sure it's not as compact as a pancake, but I'm not about to put my camera in my pocket anyway.

For $199, it was a no-brainer.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great value for a tack sharp lens, April 22, 2012
By 
This review is from: Sigma 30mm F2.8 EX DN- Sony E 330965 (Electronics)
I have been using this lens with my NEX-7 for about a week. I am honestly amazed every time I pixel peep photos taken with this lens. It is razor sharp. For a $200 dollar lens I am getting photos sharper than my $1000 Zeiss 24 1.8. Sure the Zeiss is a superior lens in almost every aspect and equals sharpness once the aperture is stopped down a bit but it costs $900 dollars more and is roughly twice the size.

The build quality of the Sigma is decent and it has a wonderful smooth, thick focus ring, perfect for manual focus adjustment. The plastic matte finish does not look cheap and it does have a metal mount. The size is very compact making it the smallest NEX lens minus the 16mm 2.8 which is not nearly as sharp. It has average macro capabilities focusing from about a foot away so dont buy this lens with the thought of macro work. The lens feels like something loose inside the barrel but it has no impact on image quality and is consistent with all lenses. It is not superfast to autofocus and there is hunting in low light but I can blame this more on the camera. It is definitely not an action lens but I dont know many people using 30mm primes for action.

The best quality of this lens is it's image quality and in my opinion that is the single biggest factor in determining a good lens. I would love it to have larger than an f/2.8 aperture for a shallower depth of field and more usability in low light but for $200 it more than satisfies and 2/8 is still significantly large to achieve decent depth of field. Highly recommended lens.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Make the most of your NEX, July 4, 2012
By 
Eric T "ejt" (Marion, IA United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Sigma 30mm F2.8 EX DN- Sony E 330965 (Electronics)
Bottom Line:
This is an affordable E mount lens that will let you take advantage of the high resolution of your NEX 7 (or any NEX cameras) sensor. The lens clunks when tipped end-to-end when powered off, this is normal.

Pros:
Low Price
Excellent image quality across the frame at all apertures.

Cons:
Aperture is a bit small at f/2.8 for a fixed focal lens of this size

Review:
The lens is excellent sharpness and resolution across the frame at all apertures. Distortion is pretty normal for this focal length with about 1% barrel distortion which is visible in some situations, might not be ideal for video with straight lines. Lens aberrations are well controlled, and there isn't much to dislike about this lens. I comment on size only because some other companies have equivalent lenses that are smaller and/or have smaller apertures.

Focus speed seems good in good light, and in low light the lens can hunt a little. I like the manual focus feel with DMF. The ring is well weighted and it is very easy to nail critical focus. Just realize this isn't the fastest lens for manual focus, but very accurate. It isn't going to feel like a manual focus Leica range finder lens, totally the opposite, but it makes small adjustments that are easy to get critical focus from a tripod or similar.

The clunking when you tip the lens end-to-end is from the focus lens elements sliding back and forth. They use a linear motor, like some maglev trains, that positions the lens elements using electromagnets. When the lens is powered off these are free to slide back and forth, but when it powers up they are held in place by the electromagnets. The downside here is that as long as the lens is turned on the batteries will drain a bit faster in the camera. On the plus side, when they improve focus speed of the NEX cameras, this lens should be able to focus faster.

Keep in mind, this is only 1 stop larger aperture than the kit zoom at the same setting, and your main benefit is going to be sharper corners vs the kit lens, and maybe sharper overall if you have a NEX 7 that out resolves the kit lens.

Again, buy this lens if you want a professional image quality lens from your NEX for a very good price and without resorting to large or expensive adapted lenses. So many of the current zooms and even the 30 mm f/3.5 macro, are no good in the extreme corners. The Image space telecentric design of the Sigma allows it to perform well across the entire frame. It is a little over half the size of the kit zoom, and lacks the flexibility and stabilizer, but is a nice step up in image quality.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice lens - but do you need it?, January 13, 2013
By 
Marilee (United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Sigma 30mm F2.8 EX DN- Sony E 330965 (Electronics)
I bought this lens after David Taylor-Hughes and Roger Cicala independently described it as the lens deal of the year. If you want a dissenting view, see Kurt Munger's review: he suggests this lens is too similar to the 18-55mm kit zoom lens that most NEX owners already have (the Sigma allows larger aperture, the zoom has SteadyShot). Like others here, I have found this lens sharp, smallish, lightweight, inexpensive, and a useful focal length. However, for my style of photography, I think Kurt has a valid point.

Background: I purchased a NEX with the kit zoom. I next purchased the Sony SEL 50mm f1.8 and it was a revelation. The wide aperture and longer focal length are excellent for portraits (aperture allows great bokeh, focal length provides pleasing perspective). The fast aperture is also great for dim (indoor) lighting. While this is a review of the Sigma lens, I do think most people should get either the 50f18 (better for portraits) or 35f18 (better for indoors) before considering other alternatives. My style of photos is to use a wide angle lens with small aperture for landscapes and architecture photos and to use the 50mm with a wide aperture for pictures of people.

Performance (see my gallery for images): On my 16mp NEX 5N the differences between the Sigma and my 18-55mm kit zoom are subtle (and are most noticeable at the corners of the image). Perhaps the 24mp NEX 7 is better able to detect the defects of the kit zoom. However, I also think the type of photography does plays a role. I tested all my lenses on a bright day shooting distant buildings at ISO 100 and f5.6-8. The kit zoom performs very poorly at 50mm with a distant focus (see photoheadonline for examples) and the 50f18 was clearly superior. However, in this situation my zoom performed very well at 30mm. The Sigma was only marginally sharper, particularly in the corners (though it exhibits a little more chromatic aberration). I next shot indoors at about 10 feet, where a higher ISO (400) and wider aperture (f4) was appropriate. Here the Sigma does outperform the kit zoom by a wider margin, though unless I pixel-peeped I would not have noticed a difference. All images were taken raw and I used the provided LightRoom lens profile corrections. However, for all these comparisons I used a tripod, so the zoom's benefit of vibration control was eliminated. When used hand-held indoors, I did notice a higher portion of my Sigma photos show vibration artifacts, so you need to watch your shutter speed and your shutter technique.

Design/Size: This lens appears to be derived from the one in the Sigma dp2 Merrill, with one less element (I assume the dp2's huge rear element allows the more compact design) and one less aperture blade (so stopped-down bokeh will not be quite as round). This lens is about 2/3 the size of the kit zoom but much larger than pancake lenses. I feel it is a nice size: good balance and nice sized focus ring.

Reflections on the kit zoom: some love this lens, some loathe it. I think this reflects different usage. My own findings match the photoheadonline and lenstip reviews: it is good with f5.6-f8 and in the middle of the focal range. Good photographers bat to the strength of each lens: see the lovely landscapes David Taylor-Hughes has taken with this zoom.

In sum, this is a fine lens and a good value. But ask yourself this: do you need it? For me, I will always travel with 50f18 along with either the Sigma (more compact, sharper) or the zoom (more versatile). Carrying both the Sigma and the zoom seems superfluous. I bought a mirrorless camera because it is compact, and it is strangely gratifying to discover that two lenses are sufficient to cover my style of photography.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for price point, July 19, 2012
By 
R. Doyle (Chicago area, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I really like this lens. It's the only lens I've gotten beside Oly 14-42 mkii, and I have found to to be a great companion to the kit lens.

F/2.8 isn't the best available, but it beats the kit lens, and does have great performance for the price point. Pleasing bokeh. Good portraits, and f/2.8 is just enough aperture to create nice depth of field to separate your subject (which you cannot do much with the kit lens). Good zoomed in scenic shots. Very light. Fast autofocus. Smooth manual focus. I found that this lens can produce a significantly better image at 30mm compared to the Oly 14-42 mkii zoomed in to 30-42mm. Better meaning much sharper, much more contrasty. With the weak AA filter of the E-PL2, this lens produces strikingly sharp photos at about f/6.3-7.1. Wide open to f/2.8 it is quite good, too.

It feels a bit more solid than the Oly kit lens, but neither lens seems built to last forever.

Sizewise, it's not a pancake, not huge either, maybe a bit similar to the Oly kit lens in storage position.

There is a bit of a rattling element inside when not attached to the camera. Others have said that it's normal, and when you attach to the camera the rattle does stop. Just seemed a bit worrisome until I read others' writings about it.

I do wish the closest focus point was a bit better; it's 1ft, so the lens won't work for macro, though it will focus close enough to fill the image with a salad bowl or small dinner plate.

Finally, it's true that f/2.8 is not terribly impressive and you could pay 2-3x the price for something else. For me, this lens fit the budget and is therefore worthy of 5 stars.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A logical and useful purchase for the NEX System, June 5, 2012
This review is from: Sigma 30mm F2.8 EX DN- Sony E 330965 (Electronics)
This review is based on my use of this lens on an NEX-7. The test was conducted with the NEX-7 mounted on a tripod. Shutter was released by timer or by wireless infrared remote.

This lens performs very well on the NEX-7. It is very sharp at the center wide-open and the borders and corners improves visibly at f/3.5, becoming best at f/4.0. Contrast is average at f/2.8 but is very good by f/4.0. Compared to the Zeiss 24mm f/1.8, color is a bit muted and less saturated but is not at all objectionable and is typical of most Sigma lenses. I expected less flaring from this lens due to its design of having fewer elements and grouping but lens flare is quite average and thus not exceptional. Chromatic aberration is there at f/2.8 and at pretty much all aperture settings not improving as one steps down.

The lens is priced reasonably at less than $200 but I would not consider it as an exceptional value. While it is true that this lens is priced considerably much less than the Zeiss 24mm f/1.8, there are several factors that explains why I consider this lens as of average value. This is why I rate this lens at 4 stars instead of 5 stars.

First is the aperture of f/2.8. being 1 and 1/3 stops slower than f/1.8, shooting in low light will require increasing the ISO rating by at least 1 and 1/3-stop to achieve the same exposure value or slowing to a considerably slower shutter speed.

Second is the built quality. This lens rattle when the camera is off and there is a very audible click when the lens is engaged to auto-focus when the shutter is half-pressed. In a quiet room, this is very noticeable and can get annoying. There is also some delay before the lens is ready to use and can autofocus. This may be a concern for those who need to shoot quickly as soon after the camera is powered-on.

Third is price. While most would see $200 as a reasonable price, one should compare this against other lenses such as the Nikkor f/1.8G AF-S which sells for about the same price. That lens is much faster, has better optics, and is small and compact. The Nikkor does not rattle and is extremely quiet in operation. Moreover, it comes with a lens hood while this Sigma does not have one. This is rather strange as the Sigma 19mm f/2.8 E-mount comes with a hood though that hood will not fit this Sigma 30mm f/2.8. This Sigma lens does come with a nicer pouch than the pouch for the Nikkor lens. For video and for those times when I need more light and keep my ISO low, I will likely use my Nikkor 35mm f/1.8 despite having its disadvantage of having to manually focus the lens. This Sigma 30mm f/2.8 does not break any good ground when it comes to value for money.

Given the limited selection of good native E-mount lenses for the Sony NEX, this Sigma 30mm f/2.8 is a good buy for anyone looking for a good prime lens to use with an NEX camera system. But as the lens choice improve over the years, it will likely be overshadowed by faster lenses sold hopefully at about the same price. Until this happens, this Sigma 30mm f/2.8 is a logical and useful purchase.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Effective low cost prime, November 24, 2012
By 
Jim Hart (Warren, MI USA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I acquired the Sigma 30mm 2.8 prime lens for use on an Olympus OM-D EM-5 body.

Accessories:

The lens does not come with a hood, but does come with a very nice zippered pouch.

Basics:

On micro-four-thirds bodies the lens is equivalent to a 60mm point-of-view on a full frame 35mm camera body. The depth-of-field focus is equivalent to f/5.6 on a full frame 35mm camera body. (Those with questions on equivalency of micro-four-thirds lenses can find considerable material on the subject on the Internet).

The lens may be considered as a "short portrait" lens (naturally it can be successfully used for more than portraits).

Build:

The lens is mostly plastic in build materials, but does offer a metal mount. It is lightweight. While inexpensive, it does not feel "cheap".

There is no weather sealing.

The floating lens element rattles when the lens is not mounted to a camera body. This is normal in this type of lens design and not a flaw.

Performance:

There is a small delay when powering up the OM-D when this lens is mounted; the viewfinder remains dark for just a few moments while the lens powers up; not an extensive period of time, but noticeably longer than, say, the Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 lens.

Focusing, on the OM-D, is quiet (no "rattle snaking" noise). Focusing is quick, and I've not seen evidence of searching for focus on the OM-D body. The focusing is, of course, "fly by wire" so the feel of manual focusing is not up to par with the 35mm lenses of old; however the feel is comparable with other, more expensive modern lenses. Being electronic there is no on-the-lens aperture ring, nor is there a distance scale on the lens. This is typical of electronic lenses.

Minimum focus distance is .98 of one foot; this is not a macro lens.

Vignetting (light drop off in the corners of the photograph) is not a major factor, even with the lens opened up to 2.8.

The images are sharp (on the OM-D body) and the colors good.

There is no built in lens stabilization. This is not an issue with Olympus micro-four-thirds bodies, which have image stabilization built in, but could be an issue with Panasonic bodies. With f/2.8 as the largest aperture the lens cannot be considered "fast" for a prime lens. Handheld low light performance, therefore, may be better on Olympus bodies - depending, of course, on the skill and steadiness of the individual photographer.

Value:

At this price range this lens may be considered a "value priced" lens. I consider it an excellent value at $199. There are certainly faster primes, and sharper zoom lenses at 30mm - but not at this price level. Sigma includes a one year warranty with the lens.

HTH

Jim
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't quite have useful niche, but good, December 25, 2013
By 
D. H Mark (Chicago, IL USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sigma 30mm F2.8 EX DN- Sony E 330965 (Electronics)
I bought this based on reviews of good quality image, which it has. But it does not have any special quality in which it would be my go-to lens. It is smaller than 18-55 kit, but not a pancake. It is 1 to 1 1/2 stop faster than the kit at 30mm, but since there is no image stabilization, you lose that by needing a faster shutter speed (maybe more, based on your ability to hold still). It has only slightly better DOF. I guess the one situation where it would be better than kit is a low light situation where you want to shoot 1/200 exposure to stop action, conserve ISO. Kit lens you would have to shoot 1/100 or bump up the ISO. Not a common situation for me-- I'll just use flash or bump up the ISO a notch with the kit lens. Not sure I'll keep it over the long haul.
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Sigma 30mm F2.8 EX DN- Sony E 330965
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