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  • Sigma EF-530 DG Super Electronic Flash for Nikon DSLR
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Sigma EF-530 DG Super Electronic Flash for Nikon DSLR

by Sigma
| 5 answered questions

Available from these sellers.
  • Powerful Guide Number of 174 ft / 53m at 105mm Setting
  • Designed to work with the new TTL systems of all the popular manufacturers
  • Fully compatible with all Nikon Digital SLR cameras including the D40 and D40X
  • Covers a focal length from 24mm to 105mm
  • Autozoom function automatically sets the optimum illumination angle.
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Product Details

  • Item Weight: 11 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S.
  • ASIN: B000UHC01A
  • Item model number: B000UHC01A
  • Batteries 1 Nonstandard Battery batteries required.
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Product Warranty: For warranty information about this product, please click here
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: October 2, 2001

Product Description

Product Description

The EF-530 DG SUPER is designed to work with both AF 35mm SLR and digital Canon EOS cameras. The EF-530 DG SUPER is a multifunctional shoe mount type flash that provides a large amount of light, featuring a guide number of 53/m (174/ft) w/ISO 100. Among the diverse features of this flash, are the Autozoom function, which automatically sets the illumination angle in accordance with the focal length of the lens ETTL exposure control, which automatically regulates the amount of light bounce and swivel head functions, which comes in very handy for bounce photography FP flash, which is capable of synchronizing the flash illumination with high shutter speeds and the rear curtain synchro flash mechanism, which makes delayed synchro photography possible.

Amazon.com

When there's insufficient or unsuitable light available to take a picture, it's of paramount importance to have a ready source of supplementary light to fulfill the need. That's where Sigma's EF-530 DG super-electronic flash comes into play. Designed exclusively for Nikon digital SLR cameras, the flash offers a powerful guide number of 174 feet/53 meters and boasts the latest TTL automatic flash exposure control for easy operation. More significantly, the EF-530 is outfitted with a host of advanced features, including a modeling flash function, a multi-pulse flash, a TTL wireless flash, an FP (high-speed) flash, a rear-curtain synchro flash, and a manual flash mode that allows the photographer to set the flash power level by up to eight stops. The auto power-off function, meanwhile, automatically shuts off the display to save battery power. And when the flashgun is fully charged, the flash emits a confirmation-ready light, letting you check the flash exposure level through the camera's viewfinder.

Like Sigma's lenses, the EF-530 flash incorporates the latest features and technological advances, most of which aren't found on any other flash units save those made by the major camera makers themselves. They are the most powerful and completely dedicated flash units available for 35mm SLR and digital cameras.

Features:

  • Autozoom function that automatically sets the optimum illumination angle
  • Covers a focal length from 24mm to 105mm
  • A built-in wide panel that covers the 17mm angle
  • A tilting flashgun head for bounce flash (up by 90 degrees, to the left by 180 degrees, and to the right by 90 degrees)
  • A down tilt angle of 7 degrees for close-up photography
  • Sophisticated multifunction flash that can control advanced lighting techniques
  • Wireless slave-flash functions
  • Measures 3 by 5.5 by 4.6 inches (W x H x D)
  • Weighs 10.8 ounces
  • 1-year warranty

What's in the Box
EF-530 DG super flash for Nikon cameras, soft case, hot shoe table stand, user's manual.


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Build quality is good.
MG_CA
Then if you turn off the flash or accidentally press the "mode" button, you have to re-attach it to the camera and make all you settings all over again.
Amazon Customer
I am so glad I didn't shell out the money to get a Nikon speedlight because this is just as good.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mike on December 5, 2011
I have an SB-600 as well as the ef-530 dg super and could not get the Sigma to work as a CLS slave until I found a link from another frustrated user who figure it out. It works great now, but only if you do the following:
1) setup D7000 flash in commander mode and leave channel set on "1"
2) turn off camera and mount ef-530.
3) turn on camera and flash.
4) press shutter half way to activate metering.
5) while meter is active, quickly press the Sigma's Mode button until the screen shows up with "1 C1 Fx.x" on it. the 1 is the Group number (Group A on Nikon setup), and the C1 is the channel number. If you need to change the Group, press the SEL button until it starts flashing, use + - to select the right group, then press SEL until nothing is flashing. Remember, you need to do all of this while the camera is still metering for the shot, so keep pressing the shutter down half way while you are making changes to the flash.
6)This is the last and most important step: turn off the camera but DON'T turn off the flash. Remove the flash and place it where you're going to use it and don't hit any buttons (except ZOOM), or you'll have to start over. The Sigma will not go into standby mode as long as it's in the CLS slave mode, so no worries there.

Note: one author said to turn off both the camera and flash in step 6, which I did. When I turned the flash back on, it still showed the correct screen "1 C1 Fx.x" but it would NOT fire. Only by leaving the flash on after it has been programmed on the hotshoe will it retain the settings. Because the flash does such a great job (and it's cheap compared to an SB-900), I'm giving it 4 stars. Having to mount the stupid thing in order to program it is the only drawback I've found. Some say it tends to overexpose, but I'm not having that problem and could easily compensate by dropping the EV setting if it were an issue.

Hope this helps.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Omar Iturbe on January 11, 2011
Verified Purchase
I just got this flash and ran a few tests. It is a pretty decent unit. The build quality is noticeably inferior to that in the nikon flashes, but the light is just as good as that from an SB 900. I can easily take the build quality difference for the enormous price drop. Other than that, the flash has worked flawlessly so far. A bit soon to tell how it works in the long run yet.
I wished that they had put more tilt steps in the flash head. It has only two fixed positions, but I place it in between steps and remains there for my shooting, so it's not a huge problem. This, and a litle bit of awkwardness in the interface are the reasons why i dropped the stars to 4
I use it mostly as a slave unit and haven't encountered any problems.
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16 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 6, 2008
Do yourself a favor...spend the extra $50 and get the Nikon SB-800 instead. I initially bought the Sigma EF-530 DG Super as a lower-cost alternative to the Nikon SB-800, and I regret it. I ended up buying the Nikon SB-800 after all.

Any way I use this flash, either standalone on-camera, wireless master or wireless slave, I have to make manual adjustments to exposure because it always over exposes. In addition, as a wireless master, it often miscommunicates with the slaves, resulting in slaves firing at full power, not only over-exposing the subject, but also wasting battery life.

To setup as a wireless slave, you must first attach the flash to camera, make your settings, then remove it from the camera. Then if you turn off the flash or accidentally press the "mode" button, you have to re-attach it to the camera and make all you settings all over again. Such a hassle. In comparison, the Nikon SB-800 or SB-600 can be setup as a wireless slave without having to attach the flash to the camera, and when you turn the Nikon flashes off and back on again, all the settings are the same a you left them, so they're always ready to go straight out of the bag.

One more thing, the menus on the Sigma are very cumbersome and not very intuitive.

Bottom line, if you're only ever going to use this flash as a standalone, and having to play with exposure settings is worth saving $50 to you, then you might be okay with the Sigma EF-530 DG Super, otherwise go with the Nikon SB-800.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. Parker on March 31, 2011
Verified Purchase
Let's get the negatives out of the way. The manual is not great. You have to do some figuring out on your own. If that's not for you, then spend the money and get a Speedlight where there is a bounty of information available. Now that that is out of the way, let's move on.

For the money, I don't think you will find many better flash options. Sure, I would have liked to have a Speedlight; however, I am working through how to get better flash pictures. And the reality is that I didn't want a $400+ 'experiment' to start that process. While it has taken some time to determine how to change all of the flash settings and their impact, I was completely OK taking the time.

If you are looking to make a foray into flash photography and don't want to spend a bundle to get into it, then this is the flash you have been looking for given that you are somewhat a curious sort and have the patience to experiment. If you are not patient, then spend the money on a Speedlight and leverage all of the information available on them. Time or money, it's your choice.
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