Customer Reviews

44
4.6 out of 5 stars
Sigma EX DG 55mm Multi-Coated UV Filter
Price:$16.96 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on December 3, 2008
Verified Purchase
I got these filters for $4.95/per and I couldn't be happier. I have used B&W filters in the past, and while these are not quite in the same league, they are awfully close. Well-built, good multicoating, what more can you ask? If my Sigma 50mm macro is any indication, Sigma knows a thing or two about making glass. If you need something affordable and high quality, look no further. I see absolutely no difference between these and the more common Hoya S-HMC filters (which I also own).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Verified Purchase
As someone who makes their income in photography I use precision clear glass filters on most of my pro lenses. They are similar but not exactly the same as UV filters in that they are absolutely clear and have zero (well, as close to zero as can be reasonably expected) effect on the image, while a UV filter may have a very slight influence. UV filters generally average under $30 while precision clear glass filters range more in the $60 - $100 range. For most photographers, whether beginners or pros, there may be little-to-no difference between the two. Other than some obscure specs the quality of the multicoating is probably the biggest difference and there is so much variance in manufacturing there is no absolute way of quantifying exactly how good or lacking one filter's multicoating may be over another.

I use such filters 99% as physical protection for my lenses and like American Express says, I wouldn't leave home without them. Frankly, digital cameras derive little visible benefit from UV filters, but in most cases they can cause no harm to image quality. It is far, far easier to replace a screw-on piece of protective glass than to undo the physical damage a stone, or fingernail or (well, you name it) can cost to the surface of a lens.
Most enthusiast cameras do not have automatic lens covers, and those are the people who most need a protective cover over a lens that can and will be exposed whenever a lens cap isn't in place. Which can be most of the time for anywhere serious about photography as an amateur, enthusiast or pro. The prime candidate for this type of filter is any lens with a manual lens cap and a 30mm or larger front diameter threaded lens. Just do it ... I have been there the hard way.

There are several brands of decent UV filters for such cameras. This review can't compare them all under all conditions so it will be limited to the Sigma listed here. This can be said about it:

1. The physical construction is metal and glass and it threads smoothly on and off of the lens.
2. The frame is thin enough to not cause vignetting issues with most wide-angle lenses.
3. The glass seems to be of high quality optical grade materials.
4. The coating seems to rank well in terms of the quality of multicoating.
5. Sigma is a known and recognized brand of quality optics

I am using it one what I consider a "walkabout" or "street" camera that I do not use for professional applications (it is a Sony A7). I feel it is a good match to the stock optics of the camera. For general purpose applications like that a camera runs a high risk of getting knocked about and banged into something. This Sigma filter has given me no barriers to the inherent quality of that camera and has added a measurable amount of lens protection, for a very value-oriented price. I have no reason not to recommend it, and if you prefer a different brand other than the Sigma, at least realize the importance of putting any clear filter in front of your lens ... you won't regret it.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon July 11, 2008
Verified Purchase
It is a known fact with photo enthusiast that Sigma is a fine maker of lenses. This also holds true for this filter. It is well built, sturdy with a high quality glass, perfect if you want to protect the lens of your camera without spending a hefty amount on filters. Plus it does UV filtering too without any degradation on your pictures. Can be kept always screwed in your lens. Overall, it is a best buy, highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 19, 2014
Verified Purchase
I am using the Sigma UV filter more as a lens protector for the Panasonic FZ70 Bridge camera. The FZ70 has a super wide angle that a typical lens hood which I usually use for lens protection will clip part of the wide angle image. I chose the Sigma because they are good enough quality just a shade behind the B&W filter which I usually use. The Sigma filter feels like a good quality filter and i see little difference when on or off the lens. It's not the cheapest or most expensive so it's a good choice that I can recommend for inexpensive lenses or cameras..

If you have a very expensive lens, it's best to use no filter or buy the best filter you can buy and that means B&W which are usually off the charts for quality and price. Many Pros recommend using no filter and use a lens hood instead as your lens protector.because it is possible the filter can degrade an image. Personally, I have never tested or seen any image degradation using a good quality UV protector but know of some who have used poor quality filters which ended up seriously affected image quality. .One user returned a new camera because of poor quality images which he later found out was caused by a poorly made UV filter he purchased for lens protection.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 29, 2007
Verified Purchase
I wasn't looking to get a piece of this quality, simply to protect my lens, but this one is excellent. Go for it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon September 9, 2010
Verified Purchase
This is a good filter for the money. I would have rated higher, but the filter had a slight
flaw in it. It doesn't show up in images, but be aware that there is a problem
with quality control. Otherwise, it works well and the construction is above average.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 6, 2012
Verified Purchase
I bought a pair of these before my vacation and immediately saw a dramatic ddifference in clarity between this and the inexpensive ones they replaced. I'm very pleased and will look for them again wwhen I am again in need.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on February 8, 2008
Great price compared to retail stores. Fit perfect and does the job. I purchased this mainly to protect the lens surface, plus I get UV filtering too.
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on October 9, 2013
Verified Purchase
I bought this 55mm Sigma EX DG UV filter and it works great! Unlike the Hoya I bought recently it works great at high zooms. The Hoya distorts the image. It threw me a loop for a while. I could not figure out why the camera was producing fuzzy photos at max zoom. It turned out it was the Hoya HMC 55mm filter was doing that. No such problems with the Sigma.

I was a little concerned as the packaging and the filter itself said Sigma 55mm DG filter made in Japan. I was really happy to see it is made in Japan as the Hoya filters are made in the Philippines. I ordered the Sigma EX DG UV filer and the one they sent me is the Sigma DG filter.

I contacted Amazon and they gave me the address to the manufacturer, so I contacted them as well. I got a message from Sigma today and they told me the Sigma EX DG and the Sigma DG filters are one and the same. It is just a branding difference, but are both made of the same materials and the same process. I am passing this on as someone else might notice the difference and be wondering like I was.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 3, 2007
So far so good. Nothing to complain.Great quality, cheap price. The seller is also great(42nd street). Likely to purchase stuff again.
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