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Silent Fall


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Product Details

  • Actors: Richard Dreyfuss, Linda Hamilton, John Lithgow, J.T. Walsh, Ben Faulkner
  • Directors: Bruce Beresford
  • Writers: Akiva Goldsman
  • Producers: Gary Barber, James G. Robinson, Jim Kouf, Lynn Kouf, Penelope L. Foster
  • Format: Color, Dolby, Letterboxed, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround)
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: August 1, 2000
  • Run Time: 101 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00000FYSU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #171,557 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Silent Fall" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

An autistic boy is the only witness to his parents' murder. A psychiatrist with a troubled past of his own attempts to help the boy deal with his loss and to recount his recollection of the crime.

Customer Reviews

Richard dreyfuss does a good job on playing a psychiatrist.
Steven m. Godin jr
How much can a little boy handle without having some pretty serious symptomatology, including catatonia (or, not wanting to say what he knew so not to talk at all?).
jeanniebear
In spite of this, however, SILENT FALL engages the viewer in the whodunit aspect, although the murderer is pretty obvious.
Michael Butts

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Bonnie Sayers on October 19, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
The only movie I can really compare Silent Fall to is Mercury Rising, which I have seen several times and never tire of it and have yet to sell my copy. I now regret selling my copy of Silent Fall since Ben Faulkner plays the non-verbal autistic child, Tim quite accurately. It is kind of freaky how both children in these movies resemble my own non-verbal son. Luckily the viewer does not have to witness the murders that take place in the parent's bedroom.

Silent Fall begins in the aftermath at the residence with Tim holding the knife which is presumed to be the murder weapon. The eighteen year-old sister Sylvie is portrayed by Liv Tyler, and hiding in her closet, apparently attacked by the intruder. Supposedly she was shopping at the mall and came home while the murders were taking place.

Law enforcement has enlisted the assistance of a psychiatrist played by Richard Dreyfuss, who immediately informs them the child is autistic and sends one of the officers around the house in search of a deck of cards. At first Jake runs out not wanting to get involved with the case, but a moment later enters the house and is able to render the knife away from Tim.

Since the sister is eighteen the issue of who will take care of Tim is never really addressed, although they did stay with some relative for one day, but the incident at the dinner table resulted in Tim tearing up the kitchen.

I believe this was the first role for Liv Tyler, and her acting was quite rigid at times with no real facial expressions or hints of sadness at the loss of her parents. You could tell the compassion for her brother, but this was by the tone in her voice at times it became higher pitched.

John Lithgow plays Dr.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Reviewer from Boston on April 22, 2004
Format: DVD
This was a very intriguing movie. I liked it for its plot. Nice little whodunit. It was different. Very quiet movie. Not slow, just very quiet and steady. Parents murdered in their bedroom and the only witness is a little boy who's autistic and can't tell what he saw. Richard Dreyfus, Liv Tyler, and especially the little boy were all good. Linda Hamilton has a very minor role. I believe this was Liv Tyler's first movie -- she's not great, but not bad either.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Maximiliano F Yofre on September 13, 2006
Format: DVD
"Silent Fall" (1994) is a very good "whodunit" movie. It keeps you hooked from the very beginning.

Aussie director Bruce Beresford is something more than a good artisan. He is an artist, even if not so very recognized in the USA, where he received "only" two Oscar nominations. He has been endorsed with four Golden Berlin Bear nominations and a huge variety of awards.

He has delivered at least one unforgettable film: "Driving Miss Daisy" (1989).

At the present movie he manages to present a not very complicated thread as to what happened the crime's day, yet full of surprises and twists.

He also shows a sure hand directing boy actor Ben Faulkner in his only movie appearance.

The story is as follows a brutal butchery is perpetrated in well-to-do family's mansion.

A couple is stabbed to death, their teenage daughter is found alive but bloodied and in shock inside a closet and their ten years old autistic son has a huge knife in his hands and refuse to give it to the police or calm down.

The worried Sheriff resorts to his friend Dr. Jake Rainer to help him out of this situation.

From here on, a classic "whodunit" situation arises: the two witnesses are handicapped one way or the other. The girl wasn't able to see murder's face and was violently thrown into unconsciousness. The boy has seen everything but is unable to communicate verbally with coherence and answer questions.

No other clues arise from the following investigation.

When all leads are followed to no result the Sheriff is forced to recur to Dr. Harlinger's help. He is psychiatrist and prone to use drugs. Dr. Rainer interposes and asks to let him try to extract the information from the deeps of Timmy's mind.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael Butts HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 11, 2005
Format: DVD
Richard Dreyfuss' quiet, restrained performance highlights this durable little thriller from Bruce Beresford, the director of such movies as BREAKER MORANT, DOUBLE JEOPARDY and of course, the Oscar winning DRIVING MISS DAISY. Dreyfuss portrays a psychologist who finds himself involved in the brutal murder of a couple, whose autistic son was found holding the murder weapon. Ben Faulkner as little Tim is quite good in his role, with evocative brown eyes and a cherubic little face. Liv Tyler plays his older sister, who was also at the scene of the crime. Tyler's first role is a difficult one, and her inexperience shows in her incomplete performance, but she does have a few good moments. J.T. Walsh shows up as the sheriff who was also having an affair with the boy's mother. John Lithgow plays a callous doctor who wants to medicate the little boy; Lithgow is pretty much wasted in the role. Ditto to Linda Hamilton, who shows up as either Dreyfuss' girlfriend or wife, one never knows which. She seems to have little interest in her role or her performance. In spite of this, however, SILENT FALL engages the viewer in the whodunit aspect, although the murderer is pretty obvious. Beautifully filmed in Baltimore County, the movie manages to intrigue and entertain.
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