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411 of 434 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The TV Tuner to Get
In my house, I have a Linux home theatre PC in the TV room attached to the plasma. I have a Linux media server attached to an older TV in the basement for recordings. My wife has a Windows 7 PC on her desk. I have a MacBook Pro which I carry about and is on the home wireless network. So 4 screens in the house. All of which can call upon the HDHomerun attached to the...
Published on March 13, 2011 by Glenn R. Howes

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22 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars hdhomerun dual tuner
This is a neat little gaget. I hooked it up to my n-router and now i can watch tv on my laptop anywhere in the house with no wires. Now for the downfalls. First one is not a real big deal but the software that is included for watching tv does not come with audio codecs for windowws 7. basicly once you install the sofware and use it you will have a picture but no...
Published on March 18, 2012 by Glitch


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411 of 434 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The TV Tuner to Get, March 13, 2011
This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
In my house, I have a Linux home theatre PC in the TV room attached to the plasma. I have a Linux media server attached to an older TV in the basement for recordings. My wife has a Windows 7 PC on her desk. I have a MacBook Pro which I carry about and is on the home wireless network. So 4 screens in the house. All of which can call upon the HDHomerun attached to the rooftop antenna for high definition broadcast television of excellent quality, and very good reliability. The ability to share and the ease of configuration are the strong points of this device. I would not encumber my laptop with a USB dongle and a stiff length of RG-6 cable, just to watch TV, not when I have 802.11n wireless networking capable of carrying multiple HD streams at once. Nor would I want to split my antenna feed to give each PC a line in the off chance I'd want to view on it. And I certainly don't want to deal with indifferently supported USB drivers under Linux, or trying to find a home for my old PCI tuner in a house with no PCI slots.

An ARM based tablet computer, like an iPad, will not have the horsepower to directly decode HD MPEG-2 data streams, but you can setup a computer to convert the video to H.264. For instance, I can leave EyeTV running on my MacBook allowing me to watch content on my iPad. I don't do this because I don't like leaving my MacBook running constantly, but I could; modern computers are capable of realtime video conversion.

Even if you use this device with a digital cable system, you are likely to only receive local broadcast networks, so be aware. I combine my antenna based MythTV DVR with a Netflix subscription, giving me most of the programming I'll actually want to watch for $8 a month plus electrical costs, supplemented by pay per view from Amazon and Apple, and if I didn't have kids, that would be it for TV costs. As an added bonus, if your local broadcasters are not putting too many sub-channels on their frequency, the quality is unmatched by cable and nearly pristine. Unfortunately, some of my local networks put up to 4 sub-channels on their feeds, but most are reasonable and look great.

And electricity costs should be included in your budget. My home theatre PC and my media server are using $3 each a month in electricity just being on waiting for their "free" content.

Setting up an antenna starts with searching for the antennaweb organization's website and finding out what stations are in your area, and how big an antenna you need. I ended up installing a really big antenna on my roof with a pre-amp, but once it was setup, it was setup and maintenance free for years. In my particular setup, I have my antenna split 3 ways, to this dual tuner, to a single tuner blue HDHomerun, and to the Panasonic plasma in the TV room, allowing me to record three programs while watching something live. This is much more than adequate, as it's unusual for me to need more than two simultaneous tuners given the limitations of local broadcast content.

Installation of an HDHomerun is simple, simpler in my experience than standard tuners directly attached to a PC. The package comes with one of those mini CDs hated by Macs and other slot loaders, so you should probably get your setup software from Silicondust's website. They make prompt firmware updates as issues arise, and write high quality if spartan software. I was able to use their setup utility on Windows 7 to get Media Center to see and use the tuner. Also EyeTV on OS X saw and used the tuner, and it was very simple using MythTV to see and use the tuners on Linux. Use wired Ethernet for distribution if practical, if not do not use less than 802.11n wireless, as I've found that g wireless is not quite up to the task of streaming HD video. I generally use my MacBook with the MythTV frontend for "OS X" to watch recorded programming on the Linux media server, it's free and works reasonably well, but I do own a license for EyeTV and have watched live TV with it.

I have owned the previous incarnation of the dual tuner HDHomerun for many years and it still works, but I was eager to compare this device to the previous models, the original white one and the single tuner blue one. I'm interested in signal quality, so I spent a couple hours with an iPhone/iPad app I wrote, Signal GH, looking at how these three devices handle my hard to lock television stations.

I hoped the tuner chipset in the Dual would improve upon the 5 year old chips in the original. And it did. The new tuner is more consistent than the original and a bit more consistent than the blue. Where the older model would swing over a wider range of signal quality, for instance ranging from 65 to 75 signal quality units on a given marginal station, the Dual will consistently stay in a range like 68 to 70. In fact, for some stations my original Dual will drop signal quality entirely either for a half second or even continuously even while showing good signal strength, something the other two devices do not do. Whether this is by age or design flaw I don't know. I just know the Dual is improving on the situation which will be great when the leaves grow to block my signal in the summer. To be clear any of these will handle a strong, direct, easily tuned signal, it's the marginal stations where the newer chips make the difference between an hour lost in a show and an hour of constant distraction.

This model has only one coax port. Previously the original had two ports which would have allowed you to dedicate one port to digital unencrypted cable, QAM, and the other to digital over the air ATSC, but the vast majority of users will be only using an antenna and most of the rest only QAM, so that is no great loss. Power usage is 5 W while tuning and 3 while not, an improvement in the idle power usage, but still another electricity sink. The original also had a remote control, which I never had cause to use, but some could use for simpler setups.

I've owned a couple other TV tuners over the years and this network based product is the only one I recommend. It is flexible, can be used with a wide variety of software, does not rely on often flaky USB drivers and is available to all my computers. And it can be located remotely from my already over hot TV cabinet reducing the need for noisy cooling. If you are sure of needing only one tuned channel at a time, than the single tuner model is cheaper and has fine signal quality performance. SiliconDust has released the HDHomerun Prime CableCard network device which sounds interesting but is likely to be less flexible than this DRM free device. The fact that the new Dual is cheaper than it used to be and has a more consistent signal quality only enhances the value.

Highly recommend for cord cutting antenna users within range of multiple major network TV stations,
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74 of 84 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Installation can be non-trivial, April 21, 2011
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This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
The installation may be non-trivial if you already have another tuner on your PC. If you do not have a pre-existing tuner, then I would think the HDHR3 setup would be extremely easy.

For my setup, I had to
a) disable the Windows7 LAN firewall (until I got it working and specifically added firewall rules for the two programs involved (QuickTV and Windows Media Center)
b) remove my other QAM tuner device and deleted all the old program guide data from Windows7 Media Center to get the HDHR3 channels to be seen inside Windows Media Center without manually adding them each, one-at-a-time. This involved more complexities than can be explained here.
c) Every time I ran the HDHR3 setup program, the bad firewall settings are put back. I'm running the latest available windows software from 2 weeks ago. Be certain you get the latest available from the SiliconDust website.

IP Addresses
There is no way to set a static IP within the device. You'll need a DHCP server on your network and if you want a static IP, then your DHCP server will need to provide that. This probably isn't important to all but a very few users. If you don't have DHCP then it gets more complicated since a 169.x.x.x address will be used by the device and you'll need to set that up on your PC.

Encrypted Cable
More and more digital cable channels are being encrypted. A year ago, I received over 100 ClearQAM channels, then the cable company started encrypting them. Now we are down to about 15 useful channels (local broadcast + community access + lots of shopping). Channels above 30 are all encrypted by my cable provider and cannot be viewed through this device. Modern HDTVs have built in QAM tuners, so you can probably use that to see which channels will be viewable through the HDHR3 at your location. It does not have an analog cable channel tuner like the old "cable ready" VCRs or TVs, only ClearQAM.

Multiple Sources
Though it is a dual tuner, since there is only 1 coax input, you will need to choose either digital cable QAM or ATSC/OTA broadcast reception for both tuners. Don't expect this model to support 1 tuner on ATSC and the other on QAM regardless of the ability to select one for each tuner in the GUI.

Very Happy
Besides those items, it works wonderfully and I wish I'd purchased it sooner. The recordings are beautiful and the integration with Windows7 Media Center is great, once it is setup. I haven't tried MythTV or GB-PVR or XBMC or any other options for tuning, but suspect they will each work as expected.

2013 Update:
I've been using the HDHR3 for over a year now. For the first few months, it was tuning ClearQAM from Comcast, I got tired of paying $32/month for channels that were available with a $50 OTA antenna in the attic, so fired Comcast and built a DB4 antenna that was coax connected to the HDHR3 - 69 channels, including many that Comcast was not providing. This tuner is more sensitive than the one in my TVs.
Since it is a network tuner, I've been running Win7 Media Center inside a Linux KVM virtual machine. There are trade-offs in doing this, but if you don't plan to dedicate a PC just to 7MC, it works well provided media extenders or some other playback devices are setup. The recorded shows/movies are put into a WTV container, but I've never had any issues stripping commercials and transcoding to more efficient formats - xvid/h.264. Most of that work can be automated.

If you live in a location where multiple antennas are desirable, get a few of the HDHR3 devices (1 for each antenna) and let 7MC know which stations to record from which tuner device. Magic. Also, if you have ClearQAM cable, but want to watch OTA channels too, each device can be used for different needs - 1 for cableTV and the other for OTA antenna use.

I still wish I'd purchased the HDHR3 sooner than I did. It has been amazing.
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54 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Improve the tuner, October 3, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
As with previous versions of their product this one works fine, once you have installed the require software (downnloadable). Integrates very well with Windows Media Center (Windows 7 32 and 64 bit). I use it to watch over the air TV in HD. Media Center provide TV guide and Tivo like functionality: pause live TV, schedule recordings etc.

Using this tuner and Ooma for my phone service, I was able to give Verizon FIOS is marching orders, get faster, cheaper internet from RCN and cut my monthly bill down from $170 to $50. I do not miss cable at all.

One thing though, Silicon Dust's tuners (this one and previous models) just never seem to be as sensitive as the tuners built into the TVs - this is a problem with over the air reception of marginal strength tv channels.
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars already had one... loved it... bought another, November 7, 2011
By 
Robert J. Kierski (Farmington, MN USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
As the subject indicates, I already had one of these. I loved it so much... that I decided to buy another. And... sadly... I'm thinking about buying another.

Way back, when HDTV first started being broadcast Over The Air, I bought a HDTV tuner card. Being able to record HD TV programming without having to buy a massive processor to do all the encoding was really attractive. It was really nice to record HD programming and watch it in full HD quality sometime later. I know you can buy a box that does all that... back then, you couldn't... and then you could, but it was really expensive.

As HDTV programming was added, I quickly realized that I wanted more than one tuner. That was when I purchased my first HDHomeRun Dual tuner. It was so easy to setup and so easy to use, that I quickly realized that I needed another.

I have two of these hooked to a $24 antenna. I get something like 40 - 50 HD channels. I use MediaPortal v1.2 as the recording and playback software on my P4 box running Windows XP.

So far this fall, there have been a couple of time slots where I was recording using all 4 tuners... and wished I had a 5th.

Having said all that... if you're looking for a portable device to use with your laptop when you're on the go... this isn't it.

Pros:

1 The box is really small.
2 It draws very little power.
3 It can be put almost anywhere -- I have mine in the basement next to my Antenna splitter and home network router.
4 Solid reception even on a cheap antenna.
5 Plug-n-Play. Even Win XP recognizes it as a tuner device for Media Player.
6 Almost nothing to do for setup.
7 Two tuners.
8 One RF input, One Ethernet connection

Cons:

1 It's another box -- you have to find some place for it.
2 If you have more than one antenna, you'll need a splitter/joiner or two of these.
3 No recording software provided by Silicon Dust.
4 Little or no Documentation.
5 not portable -- requires A/C power or other power adaptor.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple and easy to set up, works like a charm, October 31, 2011
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This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
The title says it all. There are very few other electronic products (apart from iPod/ iPad) that have been so easy to set up and be functional, while solving a complex problem. I've been looking for an Over-the-air DVR for a while, but the available options were pricey or with monthly subscription (Tivo). I don't like paying for cable TV and my only monthly entertainment bill is Netflix streaming (plus cable internet).

HDHomerun was a great solution to record the shows I wanted with the laptop wirelessly. The plus point over the DVR is that you have the recorded shows to watch, wherever you go. I could even use two computers to watch or record, because of the two tuners. The channel and guide set up was a breeze with Windows Media Center. The recording quality was excellent and in HD.

Some caveats - you need to get a splitter to split the antenna signal to HDHomerun and the TV. You also need to turn off your firewall on the laptop to access the channels. HDHomeRun needs to be connected by LAN cable to the network/ router, but the laptops can be wireless (on the same network). You'll also need to get some media converter software (I used the free MC-TVConverter) to convert the windows media (.wtv) format to play on an iPad (mp4) or back to your TV wirelessly using DLNA/ Samsung Allshare (e.g., mpeg format). Also, (obviously) you need to remember to leave your computer on for recording (sleep is OK). Not a problem with desktop, but an issue with laptop, especially if you are not home/ travel. I solved this with a second laptop, but requires some constant pre-planning, unlike the DVR option of setting and forgetting completely.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The HDHomeRun instructions you might want for use with Linux, November 23, 2012
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This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
This thing produces amazing picture and sound quality even with weak signals. Of course, if the signals are really weak in your area (see TVfool), you'll need an antenna placed where it can detect the signals, and with enough gain to boost them to a level suitable for an antenna preamp. Once that's done, you should have no problems getting amazing video and audio from this overpriced project box with a couple of silicon tuner ICs and leds inside. If anyone else made a similar product, they'd have to compete and the price would drop to about $30.

You'd think that SiliconDust would spend some of their obscene profits on documentation for Linux. Windows installation is automatic, so no Windows documentation is required.

After flailing about for a couple of days, I discovered that the necessary software (hdhomerun-config and hdhomerun-config_gui) can be installed automatically on a computer running Ubuntu, via the Synaptic Package Manager, which itself might first have to be installed via the Ubuntu Software Center. Ubuntu Software Center installs only the GUI, which oddly doesn't facilitate recording - just tuning, essentially. However, I'm not certain that Synaptic Package Manager installs the VLC player, which is one of the few players that can play the HDHomeRun's output directly. So I suggest installing all of the software first via Synaptic, and then checking for the VLC player. If it's not present, then install the GUI software via Ubuntu Software Center - it will install only what Synaptic didn't. Or you could get a degree in programming, and do it manually.

Then, by entering some simple commands (outlined below) into command-lines in terminal windows, you can save the HDHomeRun's output directly to your hard drive with no conversion to another format, so the recordings are also amazing, but they consume a lot of disk space. (By the way, the xfs format is the most efficient for recording and deleting those potentially vast ts files, so you might want to create a partition for your Videos directory and give it the xfs format.)

The HDHomeRun can be connected directly to PC's, and this paragraph describes how this is done with a computer running Ubuntu 12.04. (Connecting the HDHR to a router would be simpler, if you had a router.) In Windows, this setup is totally automatic, but in Ubuntu, it's only partly automatic. In Ubuntu (as with Windows), you have to first connect the signal and power to the HDHomerun, and connect it to your PC. Then you open the System Settings ("gear" icon on left of screen) and select Network, select Wired, and then set the on/off button to On. Then, you click on Options, then IPv4 Settings. Then, in the Method box, select Link-Local Only, and Ubuntu will automatically establish a connection to the HDHomeRun. The exact procedure will vary between some versions of Ubuntu, but I assume there will be some resemblance. If the HDHR and your computer ever have difficulty establishing a connection, after having established connections previously, go into System Settings/Network/Wired and verify that the port is turned on. Sometime clicking on Rescan in the HDHR control panel helps.

At this point, you should be able to fire up the HDHomeRun GUI by clicking on its icon on the left side of the screen (assuming you let the Ubuntu Software Center and Synaptic Package Manager install the HDHomeRun software, as described above). You should also be able to find channels and view them via the VLC player. (If scenes with motion appear "smeared," this could be due to the VLC player's difficulty with de-compressing the amount of compression used by that station. One fix is to record it and convert it to another format before viewing.) YOU CAN ALSO SAVE THE PROGRAM YOU'RE WATCHING to Downloads by clicking on the Record button, which can be made to appear by clicking on View in the main menu, and selecting Advanced Controls.

The VLC player produces smeared/pixelated video when playing some programs, because some high-definition programs are difficult to decode "on the fly" due to the amount of compression used in encoding them. Although I can't rule out other solutions, one solution that works very well for me is to save the program to disk, and convert it to a format which is easier to play. A "transcoder" program called Handbrake performs such conversions very simply, and with excellent results. You just need enough space on your drive for the source file and the output file.

As far as I know, VLC doesn't facilitate recording both tuners' outputs simultaneously. Its documentation doesn't say anything about recording, and there's nothing about recording with VLC on the internet either (or at least there wasn't until this was published), other than a passing remark about the hidden Record button.

However, there is a way to record the outputs of both tuners simultaneously without installing any more software. It requires typing (or copying/pasting) text into the Linux command-line, which is accessed by pressing Ctrl-Alt-t. Pasting into the command line in done with Ctrl-Shift-v.

First, set each tuner to the desired channel, and note that each tuner has the same ID#, followed by -0 or -1 (displayed in the GUI). Then open two terminal-windows, because once you start a recording process in one window, you won't be able to enter any more commands into it.

Then decide where you want to put the recordings (.ts files) and change the directory (folder) to that directory by typing cd Downloads or cd Videos (or whatever folder you want to use) into the command line, and pressing Enter. (Note: the cd command is case-sensitive, so that "videos" is not the same directory as "Videos.") Then decide what you want to name the files. In the first, terminal, enter the following command:

hdhomerun_confg ID# save /tunerN filename.ts,

where ID# is the tuner's ID#, N is 0 or 1, and filename is the file where you want to save that tuner's output. (These commands can be found in the HDHomeRun Development Guide, which can be found by Googling the title.)

That should start the recording process for that tuner, and the terminal-window will start filling up with dots to indicate recording in progress.

To record the other tuner's output, do the same thing in another terminal-window.

To stop EACH recording, click on the ID# of the associated tuner in the GUI "control panel," click on Stop, and then close the associated terminal-window.

Once you're done recording, you can close the terminal windows, open the VLC player, and open the recording you want to watch.

Those who want to automate recording to a degree similar to that of programming a VCR should consider HDHomeRun Recorder. The official page can be found by Googling "hdhomerun_recorder" (with the quotation marks and the underscore). As of this writing (12/12), the best set of instructions I've seen on installing and using it is contained in the Michigan Telephone blog, also evidently written by a programmer.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great tuner for my specific need., March 3, 2012
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This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
I have 2 flat screen tv's, both with a dedicated computer running them. This was the perfect addition! We ditched cable/dishnetwork and use OTA TV, Netflix, Hulu free, and the Windows Media Center online TV. With this little device (it's very small) I can also record (2 channels at once) OTA TV with Windows Media Center and play it back later, as well as pause/rewind OTA TV. Since the TV's also have their own tuner, even while recording 2 shows we can watch live TV on other channels. The quality is perfect HD just like a built in TV tuner. Uses about 15mb of network bandwidth in HD...so on shared wireless, you need to be using N and have good signal.
On a side note, Windows Media Center makes a way better DVR that I expected--if you use it often a WMC remote is worth it.
Setup is simple, install the device, download the latest software online (don't use the included disk), install the software, run through the setup, and use your preferred tuner. I used the android hdhomerun app to tune the antenna with my phone.

additional hardware I used:
PCT 4-Port RF Signal Amplifer With Active Return
Windows 7 Vista XP Media Center MCE PC Remote Control
Logitech Wireless Touch Keyboard K400
Of course the laptop's and TV's.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Decodes Digital Cable In-The-Clear Signals Very Well, August 25, 2011
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This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
I love this new QAM decoder. I have been using an older HDhomerun tuner similar to this for over 5 years without any problems so I'm expecting great things from this unit as well. I have been using this new device for about a month now without any problems what-so-ever. Some have noted a concern with .net problems on XP machines but my system and setup have been problem free.

My setup has my 2 digital tuners now running into a gigabit switch. I upgraded my computer's network card to a gigabit card to handle the 4 digital signal feeds from my 2 tuners.

I decode the digital cable signals from my cable provider giving me some 85 digital channels. Luckily my cable provider is Wide Open West and not Comcast, as Comcast is known to encrypt their digital signals to force customers to rent their cable boxes. If the signal is encrypted like on Comcast or if you have pay channels, then this device won't be able to decode them.

Setup for SageTV use:
I followed the instructions in the box. Clear and simple. After plugging in the unit and downloading the latest firmware I went into the setup and scanned for channels. Next I went into the channel line up list and corrected some channel descriptions to match those in the EPG (Electronic Program Guide) that I use from Zap2It. The channel descriptors need to match the EPG descriptors in order for my computer to display the program guide correctly.

After the tuner was all set up I then went into SageTV and added the device as a digital tuner using the EPG for my local cable company.

Start-up for Use:
The device jumped into action right away. I didn't know I had already set up a TV program to record but the new HDHR3 tuner immediately went to the right channel and started recording the program as soon as I installed it.

Likes:
- Easy to program
- Awesome clarity of picture
- Fast tuning
- Only uses 1 input coax cable to tune both internal tuners
- Streams 2 digital channel signals over hardwired LAN for use by all computers in the home
- Some have said these unit get warm to the touch but I haven't found this to be the case

Dislikes:
- Both built in tuners in the HDHR3 use the same source (can't have one tuner use roof antenna and other tuner use CATV line)
- Had to pay to get it

Suggestions:
- If you are using multiple digital tuners you may wish to upgrade your network to gigabit in order to process all signals coming from the switch.
Note: the HDHR3 does not have a gigabit port but my switch and computer do so combining the stream from the switch to the computer will be cleaner especially if I am then retransmitting from the computer to an extender while the digital tuners are talking to the computer.

My Current Setup:
- Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005
- Gigabit LAN card in computer using PCI Express
- HDHomerun (digital tuner: older version)
- HDHR3 (this newer digital tuner)
- WinTV PVR500 (analog tuner using cable box to convert digital signal)*I will remove this tuner card
- WinTV PVR250 (analog tuner using cable box to convert digital signal)*I will remove this tuner card
- 8 port Netgear gigabit switch
- SageTV DVR system (streams recorded programs over LAN to extenders allowing viewing anywhere in home or on-the-road)
- 3 hardwired SageTV extenders (used to view recorded TV, online media, DVDs, etc from computer in basement)

Now that I have this tuner running with my previous HDhomerun tuner I going to remove my older analog tuners that are inside the computer I'm running SageTV on. I think being able to record 4 channels at the same time, with my older HDhomerun tuner and this new HDHR3 digital tuner, is probably enough.

I'll return the cable boxes I use to use to decode my channels. This should save me some electricity and cable box rental fees. Since I don't have any premium channels I won't be losing any channels with this new tuner. If I had premium channels this tuner wouldn't be able to decrypt them.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top Notch Performance and Excellent Support, September 8, 2011
This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
I have been very impressed after a year of use. The tuner is reliable, always on, and not tied to a single PC as with PCI or USB-based tuners. The install is quick and lightweight, and I am able to watch crystal clear HDTV on every PC in my house. Combined with the Windows 7 Media Center (with free DVR guide) it has allowed me to "cut the cord" from subscription TV bills of any kind.

Also equally impressive is the SiliconDust technical support. I was receiving all the major networks over an antenna, except for the CW network. I hadn't really cared until recently when a family member wanted to watch a new show. Windows Media Center always said "no signal" indicating a weak station, but when investigating I noticed the SiliconDust app was able to see the station. I sent their technical support an email, and as it turns out the station had some problems in their broadcast signal which confused Media Center into displaying the "no signal" message. Unbelievably, the SiliconDust folks contacted the station on my behalf and worked with their engineers to resolve the issue within a couple of days!

This was really impressive, that in this age of outsourced and lacking technical support by most companies, they were willing to stand behind their product to this level and research/resolve a problem that technically was a Microsoft problem. Would highly recommend this company!
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26 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SiliconDust HDHomeRun not for Apple Macs, January 6, 2012
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This review is from: SiliconDust HDHomeRun DUAL High Definition Digital TV Tuner HDHR3-US (Black) (2013 Model) (Electronics)
I just purchased the SiliconDust HDHomeRun from Amazon. I went through hours of frustration trying to get it to work on an APPLE iMAC. After phoning both SiliconDust (not helpful), and Elgato (very helpful), I got the story about SiliconDust and Elgato. SiliconDust version of the HDHomeRun is for PC computers, and Elgato's version of HDHomeRun is the same hardware, plus the activation code for EyeTV, which MAC users will need.

So I'm returning the SiliconDust, and bought the Elgato.

APPLE Macintosh users should buy the ELGATO version of HDHomeRun DUAL. The hardware is the same, but huge difference in software!!

Elgato is $149 and comes with the $79 EyeTV activation code, and the $20 TV Guide (for one year).

You could buy the SiliconDust hardware for $90 (non-mac friendly), go thru all the frustration and tech support, and then buy the Software for $80 to get the same thing as the Elgato hardware which comes with software and cost less.
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