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Silverado: Neil Bush and the Savings & Loan Scandal Hardcover – August 1, 1991

ISBN-13: 978-0915765898 ISBN-10: 0915765896 Edition: 1ST

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Natl Pr Books; 1ST edition (August 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0915765896
  • ISBN-13: 978-0915765898
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 6.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,180,728 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Denver Post reporter Wilmsen broke the story of the president's son's connection with Silverado Savings and Loan when he discovered that two of the Denver thrift's biggest borrowers were Neil Bush's business partners. In a complicated tale of greed and irresponsibility, Wilmsen steers the reader through Silverado's shady dealings, focusing on a handful of deceitful key players who gutted the institution. While highlighting Neil Bush's unrestrained drive for wealth, position and social status, the author endorses the notion that "ethically myopic" Bush believed he had done no wrong. The book apportions a good deal of blame to the accounting firm Coopers & Lybrand, which ignored clear signs that the thrift was near insolvency to report that it was in excellent financial health. The federal government has now settled its suit against Silverado, including ex-director Bush. First serial to Playboy.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Wilmsen, an investigative journalist, examines the history of the Silverado Bank scandal and the role President Bush's son Neil played in this affair. He details the involvement of bank officials, especially the crafty chairman, Michael Wise, and his relationship with Neil Bush in a series of business deals that resulted in embarrassment and scandal. The biographies of the chief protagonists and the background of the deregulation policies and banking put things into perspective for the reader. However the particular activities of Wise and Bush, which are thoroughly documented herein, provide thought-provoking reading that will be of interest to all followers of recent banking activities. For general business collections.
- Steven J. Mayover, Free Lib. of Philadelphia
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sonya D. Stutts on October 6, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book was great!!! The author told a very thorough story about how individuals as well as respected professions contributed to the Silverado S & L / Real Estate scandal from Michael Wise, Neil Bush (& subsequently his father's political weight), Kermit Mowbray, Coopers & Lybrand, Bill Walters, former commodities trader Kenneth Good, to Larry Mizel of MDC Homes and the countless politicians he & his company's subcontractors funded to pave the way for one of the most notorious financial scandals produced from the great Republican deregulation era. Conversely, the real estate appraisal industry picked up a regulatory big brother, but they weren't alone in 3rd party contributory damage...let's not forget the consultants, accountants, and Federal regulators...and have I mentioned 'countless politicians...elephants as well as asses?'

This story isn't about Neil Bush bashing, although it easily could've been considering how naive the author thinks of him. Perhaps Neil really is that simple or maybe the Bush men just make great puppets!(Wise, the Saudis, Rove ;-)...Regardless who was behind the Wizard's curtain when the Feds were instructed to wait until after daddy Bush's election...Neil rode his family name to gain social access, financial favors, and eventually, a protective shield.

Exercise your own judgment...its an easy read, very entertaining & well worth the change plus shipping & handling :-)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ryan on January 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Many will read this book for the political content about Neil Bush and the politics behind that family. The book is actually far more interesting when read as a history of Colorado's rough and tumble world of banking and real estate back in the 1980s. The political content was actually the least interesting part of the book, as Wilmsen has a rather unsophisticated view of the political system and keeps blaming everything on "deregulation." Wilmsen clearly does not understand monetary policy or central banking and how that was a key part of the S&L crisis. Wilmsen simply ignores all that.

Nevertheless, the history that Wilmsen provides on life among the plutocrats in Colorado during the 1980s was both entertaining and informative, and provides a lot of information on 1980s Colorado that can't be found anywhere else in book form. This is a short, fast read that is well constructed as a sort of thriller involving a race between the Silverado leadership and reality itself. The real world eventually caught up with Silverado and it all came crashing down.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R Schafer on March 24, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a must read and a keeper for your Personal Library. Goes into the S&L mess of the 80's. Surprisingly many names appear that have reappeared! Surprise, surprise ! As a reader you will be surprised by the depth and breadth of the mess and the sorry lot of participants who looted many for much. The Darker side of the American version of Capitalism exposed live and in living color.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bruce P. Barten on January 13, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The author of this book, Steven Wilmsen, was a financial reporter for the `Denver Business Journal' prior to reporting for the Denver Post in 1989. The copy I have of SILVERADO (1991), was published when the father of Neil Bush was President of the United States. Whether anything further has come to light, I can't say, and this book did not know why Colorado's plan to close Silverado at the end of October, 1988, during the presidential election campaign, was delayed by a mystery phone call that resulted in fantastic losses before the official closing date of December 8 or 9, 1988. "On October 21, the Colorado savings and loan commissioner called Mowbray in Topeka and said he would close the thrift before the end of the month. Mowbray, suddenly and unexpectedly, ordered the proceedings to a halt. A call had come from Washington asking Mowbray to hold off closing Silverado for forty-five days." (p. 183).
I do not see any logic for assuming that the bank had hundreds of millions of dollars more in September than in December of 1988, but this book says:
"The cost of that delay is in the hundreds of millions of dollars. In late September, regulators estimated the cost of Silverado's closure to be between $400 million and $600 million. When the thrift was finally closed December 9, it cost $1 billion." (p. 184).
If anything irks me about this book, it is the journalistic sensationalism. I like to look at the pictures (pp. 97-112) to see who the book captures and how young they looked in the 1980s. In the first nine months of 1990, Neil Bush even allowed the author to have six interviews (p.
Read more ›
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 16, 1999
Format: Hardcover
From the looks of the review attached to this book anyone who writes a review will be the first person to review the book. This is a nutty review, this "Kirkus" review. Is this actually the only book available on this Neil Bush ripoff. If it is I'll be hard put to find reviews of the other Bush boys' gun running and assorted illegal activities.
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