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52 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very easy to read
For anyone in middle-age or older, Alzheimer's Disease is a major concern. This book shows easy ways to delay its onset, perhaps for years.

If the recommendations in this book can be reduced to one sentence, it might be: Eat Right and Exercise Regularly. Eat lots of deep color berries, like black raspberries, cranberries, plums and strawberries; they are full...
Published on May 9, 2011 by Paul Lappen

versus
46 of 59 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This Book's Title=Fail.
On the basis of the title alone, I grant this opus about the same merit as I'd grant the Mark Eden bust developer I ordered from the back of a magazine when I was 15.

Here's the thing...I guess it just wouldn't be good marketing for Carper to have called her book "100 Simple Things You Can Do to Buy Yourself a Couple Extra Good Years if You've Got the...
Published on November 7, 2010 by Emily Gillespie Clement


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52 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very easy to read, May 9, 2011
By 
Paul Lappen (Manchester, CT USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
For anyone in middle-age or older, Alzheimer's Disease is a major concern. This book shows easy ways to delay its onset, perhaps for years.

If the recommendations in this book can be reduced to one sentence, it might be: Eat Right and Exercise Regularly. Eat lots of deep color berries, like black raspberries, cranberries, plums and strawberries; they are full of antioxidants. Apple juice can boost the brain's production of acetylcholine, just like the popular Alzheimer's drug Aricept. Large doses of caffeine, like several hundred mg per day, may help clean up your brain if you are showing signs of mental problems (people react differently to high doses of caffeine, so be aware of the side effects). If you have cholesterol problems, get it under control, now. Cinnamon gives a boost to malfunctioning insulin, allowing it to process sugar normally. Weak insulin can lead to diabetes, and can damage your brain cells. Did you know that coffee helps block cholesterol's bad effects on the brain, is anti-inflammatory and reduces the risk of depression, stroke and diabetes, which all promote dementia?

Mental exercise is just as important as physical exercise. Fill up your brain with lots of interesting stuff, like education, marriage, language skills, etc. You can actually grow your brain with lots of physical, mental and social activities. If you can join a health club and work out regularly, do it. If going for a walk after dinner is more your speed, do it. Conscientious people are better able to cope with setbacks in life, and can better dodge chronic psychological distress, which boosts risks of dementia. If you are clinically depressed, get it treated, or you are more likely to develop Alzheimer's. Symptoms that look like Alzheimer's can easily be something else (and something easily treatable). Go to a geriatric neurologist and get the right diagnosis, now.

The best way to prevent Alzheimer's is to reduce your personal risk factors, sooner rather than later. No one is expected to do everything in this book. Pick a dozen or so things that you can do every day, and stick with them. Anything that reduces the possibility of getting Alzheimer's, even by a little bit, is automatically a good thing. This book is very easy to read, and it is excellent.
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35 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a great book!, September 16, 2010
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At last--there are some things we can actually do about Alzheimer's!

The author has done a thorough, careful survey of the latest and best scientific research about the causes and prevention of Alzheimer's, and what the findings imply for all of us.

In clear layman's terms,the book tells you what the top researchers have learned about how to prevent and delay the onset of Alzheimer's. And the suggestions for things you can do to prevent it are just as simple as the title promises.

This book is a ray of hope amidst all the Alzheimer's gloom. I'm sending it to everyone in my family.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Put this one on your "must read" list, August 24, 2011
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Book review by Richard L. Weaver II

You must buy this book!

I have reviewed over 250 books (many of my reviews are categorized under the name of my publishing company, And Then Some Publishing, LLC), but this one -- among them all so far -- is one that should be read by everyone.

If you believe the title, Carper's book is about Alzheimer's and age-related memory loss, but when you read the book you quickly realize it is a book about healthy living, having a healthy lifestyle, and following a regimen that will bring you strength, vitality, and wellness.

100 suggestions seems like a lot; however, when you get going (each suggestion only takes up two or three pages) in this small, 294-page book. She has over 200 references for the book, and she gives you the web site where you can go to check out her sources:

What I especially enjoy is finding a book that underscores and supports the lifestyle that I have already adopted. I found that many of the suggestions by Carper are things I am already doing. Most healthy readers will find the same thing; however, most healthy readers (like myself) will also be interested in obtaining just a little more, going for that extra edge (the extra mile), and not just getting their current lifestyle reinforced but finding something that pushes them a little harder, a little farther, too.

A couple of the suggestions I have highlighted include #24, "Build `Cognitive Reserve'--Fill up your brain with lots of fascinating stuff." That idea delighted me because of the book reviews and essays I write. I think loving school, too, helps anyone build a cognitive reserve right from the outset. Getting immersed in information, learning, knowledge, and experiences builds a useful lifelong benefit.

In addition to writing about the importance of higher education, Carper also upholds the value of reading and writing in her #56, "Learn to Love Language -- Linguistic skills build bigger, smarter, stronger brains" (p. 168).

There are so many of her ideas that are just smart and worthy of adoption. Whether you have heard much of this before, Carper offers the research to support her ideas. We all need reminders to live properly and to be concerned about good health.

Two parts of the book need highlighting. First, within each chapter Carper ends with "What to do?" where she translates what she has said in explaining the idea of the chapter into practical, down-to-earth, specific kinds of things readers can do to achieve the results they want. For example, in #80, "Get a Good Night's Sleep," she writes as the first sentence of "What to do?": "Don't think of sleep as an inconvenience but as a legitimate way to subdue some of the brain's most devastating enemies. Take naps. . . . (pp. 233-234).

Also, the second part of the book that needs highlighting, I thought her section at the back of the book, "Putting it all together: Your anti-Alzheimer's plan" was especially good for it underscored what everyone can begin doing right now -- or, in other words, what the absolute, bottom-line, essentials are that can be started immediately: 1) surprise your brain, 2) get physical activity, 3) eat the right stuff and take supplements, and 4) take care of yourself.

You must buy this book! (I'm encouraging my wife and my other family members to read it. It's that good!) We purchased copies of the book and gave it as a gift to each of our four adult children.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Helpful Book, September 19, 2010
People are hungry for information on ways they can prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's. Carper gives, in an easy way to digest, 100 simple things you can do. All of them are backed with research. Easy to read and easy to follow. Great that someone has done the digging and put all the information together in a small but powerful book!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buying this book should be a no-brainer, June 3, 2011
By 
mavo (Shreveport, LA United States) - See all my reviews
if you are worried about getting this dreaded disease, there are easy methods of prevention. Eat more cinnamon, vinegar, fish and almonds, work on balance, meditate, drink apple juice (she called it natural Aricept), learn new things and engage socially. Perhaps the best part are the web links she provides to accomplish these things. She cites studies to explain her writings. There are also tips on preventing stroke. I've typed up my notes to share with my family.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for anyone approaching middle age, September 16, 2010
In clear and simple language, Jean Carper's new book is a must read for everyone approaching middle age. Good advice for keeping alzheimer's at bay and great suggestions for living a richer life!
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46 of 59 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This Book's Title=Fail., November 7, 2010
By 
Emily Gillespie Clement (Severna Park, MD United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
On the basis of the title alone, I grant this opus about the same merit as I'd grant the Mark Eden bust developer I ordered from the back of a magazine when I was 15.

Here's the thing...I guess it just wouldn't be good marketing for Carper to have called her book "100 Simple Things You Can Do to Buy Yourself a Couple Extra Good Years if You've Got the Alzheimer's Card in Your Deck."

But at least that title would have been responsible. True, it would have scared the s*** out of us, and maybe no one would buy it, but it wouldn't be generating false hope while infuriating the loved ones of the millions of people who have developed the dread disease despite living lives of healthy, active, and intellectual pursuits.

Because this is the truth: At this time in history (2010 for a couple more months) Alzheimer's is NOT a preventable disease. We CAN do our best to maximize our health, and if that's all you hope to gain from the content of Carper's book, then good for you and more power to you. We can only hope and pray that our society will wise up, maximize funding to Alzheimer's research, and give researchers the boost they need to finally come up with the real answer to prevention.

As far as I can tell, Jean Carper's intentions are good. Most of the info provided is more or less useful to the maintenance of general good health. To be fair, in the book's introduction, she does better service to the truth that what you may buy--through the exercise of good health habits--is not PREVENTION, but TIME.

But that title! Way to perpetrate what is now, sadly, a myth! If the publisher of Carper's book would kindly think twice about the title there would be a much friendlier reception from those of us who've been closely touched by Alzheimer's.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Thorough Introduction To A Perhaps Personal Malady ..., May 16, 2011
Perhaps Jean Carper could have chosen a less 'provable' word than 'prevent' in the title of her book. But that should not prevent anyone, at any age, with an interest in their own health and well being and that of their loved ones, not spend a few hours reading, and noting what Ms. Carper has to say. I was inspired to purchase it when an 88 year old friend of our 'group' (wide range of ages here, I'm 59) exhibited the loss of his short term memory, and had to quit driving in order not to get lost. Statistics show that 50% of individuals over 85 develop dementia, whether Alzheimer's, Vascular, Lewy's, etc. And it is partially due to the actuary tables changing from 71 for men and 78 for women to 81 and 84 respectively; due in large to medicine and working lives that did not resemble their parents during the Industrial Revolution and World War II.

This volume, orderly written in 100 brief chapters, lays the groundwork and the background for anyone who wishes to proceed with Dr. Scott D. Mendelson's 'beyond
alzheimers' book, which succinctly mentions how to 'avoid' the modern epidemic; and then on to 'Preventing Alzheimer's' by Drs. William Shankle and Daniel Amen.
This trio of books will enable the most interest of participants to gather the most out of the 27 years of research devoted to the brain; and how the damage humans inflict upon their remaining bodies via food and drink, obesity, becoming sedentary thanks to television, smoking, untreated sleep apnea, and perhaps not getting professional help when life turns the tables on them.

I intend to continue on with my interest and fascination in this disease that can attack young as well as old, but simply not show it's colors until treatment is a frustrating attempt to live with it. There are books for those of you who are grappling with an ill family member, to possible bring you peace, or simply explain where this curse came from. But these three books, and based on the 27 years of testing they discuss, can help any others approach retirement with a bit more knowledge on how to live out your lives to the fullest.

To those who left negative comments, please understand that the people you lost probably developed symptoms long before they let you know about it, and before drugs like Namenda, Aricept, Exelon, etc., and others that in testing were available. Life, after all, is not a perfect science, and no different than the failure of your joints, eyesight, hearing, and so forth, that marvelous brain of yours is susceptible, too.

Read these books in order. You won't be sorry. You will be enlightened.

John Tierney
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a REAL pageturner!, September 17, 2010
Carper's book is full of helpful hopeful information that you just can't stop reading. Her research seems impeccable and the suggestions she makes are doable at
any age. It doesn't make extravagent promises, but you have the strong feeling that
the more of these simple things you put into action, the better chance you have of warding off this dread disease.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Practical Steps to Prevent Age-Related Memory Loss!, September 15, 2010
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Jean Carper does it again! Cutting edge science demystified and presented as clear-cut practical advice you can begin to take right now to fend off memory loss that we all face as we age. Some information is really surprising. Who would have guessed that common infections might make you more vulnerable to brain damage leading to dementia? Or that certain types of anesthesia during surgery may raise your risk of Alzheimer's so you should avoid them? Or that a fall may mean not only a bump on the head, but dementia years later?

As always, Carper goes to the experts to gather her information, and this time she is even more passionate about the subject because it turns out she carries a major Alzheimer's gene.

Her writing is so compelling and to the point, and fun... This is definitely a five star book, enjoyable to read and packed with info not found elsewhere that can make a difference in how well we hang on to our memory.
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100 Simple Things You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer's and Age-Related Memory Loss
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