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Simply Java: An Introduction to Java Programming (Programming Series) Paperback – September 8, 2005

6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1584504269 ISBN-10: 1584504269 Edition: 1st

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Preface Chapter 1 Programming Is Like Juggling Chapter 2 Programming the Simplest Java Programs Chapter 3 Class Design and Implementation Chapter 4 Graphics and Inheritance Chapter 5 Toward Consistent Classes Chapter 6 Software Reuse Chapter 7 Conditional Statements Chapter 8 Iterative Statements and Strings Chapter 9 Simulation and Animation Chapter 10 Reading and Writing Files Chapter 11 Data Structures Chapter 12 Interfaces and Writing a List Class Chapter 13 Abstract Classes and Sorting Lists Chapter 14 Lightning Review Appendix A NetBeans 4.1 Appendix Appendix B Documentation, Access, Errors, Exceptions and repaint() Appendix C Answers to Selected Exercises Appendix D About the CD-ROM Glossary Index

About the Author

James Levenick (Salem, OR) is currently an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. He received his PhD in Computer and Communication Sciences from the University of Michigan, and his research interests include artificial intelligence and machine learning.
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Product Details

  • Series: Programming Series
  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning; 1 edition (September 8, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1584504269
  • ISBN-13: 978-1584504269
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 7.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,142,433 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By John Matlock on November 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is the first Java book that I've been able to read. The author starts off saying 'Why write yet another introductory Java book?' Good Question. The answers he said were that existing Java books were simply too tedious to read (I agree.), second, they immediately start talking about things like object orientation and classes which are useless at the beginning and are treated in those books almost like a mantra.

This book starts out writing a program. This gets you familiar with the constructs of the language before giving meaningless (at this time) definitions. In writing the program it says you have to have a bunch of words that are required, just put them in and we'll talk about them later.

The author says that he has had better experience with this approach than with other books. As one who learned programming in procedural languages more years ago than I like to remember, this approach certainly made sense to me. I'm still not a Java expert, but a lot better than I was.

The CD that comes with the book includes both the Sun Java 2 platform and the NetBeans IDE. All that you need to begin programming.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By John M. Hunt on July 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
I teach Java at the undergraduate level so I am always on the lookout for new books. It would be unfair to say it was a bad book, but I certainly don't believe its a good one. As the author points out on the first page there are plenty of other intro Java books; however, I feel he fails to make a case for adding this one.

The author states that he had three reasons for writing the book, I will take them up in term before adding my own criticisms:
1) He thinks current books are tedious to read - here the author has a point and has made some improvement. His prose style is breezy and easy to read. It's very conversational and after reading it I think I would enjoy taking a class with him or for that matter having a beer with him. His personality comes out and that's a good thing, particularly among intro Java books that do usually read as if they were written by committee.
2) He thinks current books do not get into objects quickly enough. He says that he is unable to find books that start with objects. My problem has been that I can't find books that don't. I give him credit for following through on his convictions. This book is certainly as object first as a book can be. The problem is that he provides no understanding of what an object is or why one would use them on a conceptual level. I admit that motivating objects the first week of an intro course is a tough nut to crack. But if you believe objects first is the right way to go, as the author does, then it is a hurdle that you have to overcome. This book doesn't. We are left only with the syntactically correct use of keywords like class and new and no understanding of where we are going.
3) he believes a modern IDE should be used from the beginning.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Charlton Smith on October 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
Learning JAVA can be a very steep learning curve at first, but this book takes a great approach to making it as easy and painless as possbile, mainly due to the Authors genius.
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