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4.1 out of 5 stars
Sin City, Vol. 3: The Big Fat Kill
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
The first thing you should realize before you order "The Big Fat Kill" is that it's really a big pro if you read the original Sin City story, and a MUST to read "A Dame to Kill For" prior to this one. See, the main character in this book is Dwight, a man who tries to stay as anonymous as possible because elseways his criminal past may catch up with him. This past that he's hiding from is the story from "A Dame to Kill For", so you should really get that first. It makes it a lot easier to understand a lot of why Dwight's acting the way he is. There's also some conversation about Marv, the main character from the original story. But Marv is not a major factor in this book so reading the original story is really only a pro, not a must.
About the story: Oneday a girl named Shelley is being harassed in her own home by a guy named Jack, her drunk ex-boyfriend, and his friends. Dwight, who is living with Shelley 'convinces' them to leave and decides to follow them to make sure he doesn't do any more damage. Only Jack turns out to be so dumb to drive into Old Town, a place where the hookers are the law because of the pact they made with the police ('they stay off the police's back, the police stays off their backs'). Jack and his friends wind up dead, upon which they find out Jack is really a cop while examing the body. This will clearly lead to war between the cops and Old Town, leaving it a free warzone for the mob, IF the cops ever find out about Jack. Dwight thinks to have the solution to get rid of the bodies and goes on his way. But things turn out to be not that easy. What follows is an interesting story with several different parties of power and interests, violence, a lot of backstabbing, loyalty and finally an interesting plot-twist.
In all honesty I think the original "Sin City", "A Dame to Kill For" and especially "That Yellow Bastard" are better books than this one, so if you haven't read all of those yet I think you'd rather read those first. With that I'm NOT saying this is a bad book because it isn't. In my opinion it's actually a very good tale which keeps interesting to the very end because of the different directions the story takes all the time. It's also carried by Frank Millers trademark (by now) art. This is really suitable for the story, it being a dark grimmy 'mad-cop' story, and of no less quality than you're used to if you've been a Sin City reader longer. I just don't think it's THE best Sin City story out there. Get the other ones I named first, than get this one and have yourself a good time with it.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on January 7, 2004
I've never written one of these reviews before, but I had to put in my two cents and say that yeah, "Big Fat Kill" is kind of slim in terms of a plot, but it's slim like a sharp-ass ninja sword - it sticks right through ya. I can't look at a single page of this book without starting over and reading it all the way through (and there's something excellent about the fact that it takes maybe half-an-hour to do that). Don't let these chuckleheads fool you - this book has the simplicity and power of fairy tales, dirty jokes, and (gasp!) crime stories and comic books. It's a bracing reminder that not every graphic novel needs to be freakin' "Watchmen"!
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on January 4, 2005
Like I said in my Sin City review, if you're buying this book this late in the Sin City game, it's probably because you've been intrigued by the terrific trailer of the Robert Rodriguez directed film. Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller have made what appears to be the most successfully adapted comic book movie of all time. If you buy this book, you will see DOZENS of scenes from the preview within the pages of "The Big Fat Kill" because Rodriguez and Miller stayed 100% true to the comic story. So with that said,congratulations! You've just stumbled across one of the best comic stories ever told.

Frank Miller tells a story unlike any other comic artist in the history of comics. The Big Fat Kill takes the story of Basin (Sin) City's prostitues and their power they have over Sin City's "old town" to a whole new level. Miller and the girls of his story make the reader care about filthy immoral prostitutes, murderers, mobsters, and dishonest police officers to a degree that they dnever thought possible. Miller's drawings, while vague, match the storytelling to a degree that is all too rare in comics today.

THe Big Fat Kill is a very well told story that is well worth the read to Sin CIty fans both new and old.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2005
Sin City: The Big Fat Kill is a direct sequel to Sin City: A Dame to Kill For. It picks up the story of that book's hero, Dwight, a few months later. Dwight has a weakness for rescuing "damsels in distress", which constantly puts his life in danger. I don't want to give away the plot, so that's all I will say about that. This is another beautifully drawn, black and white "noir" comic by Frank Miller. It has a lot of violence and nudity (although the nudity is mostly in the shadows). This is one of the stories that is being adapted into the Sin City motion picture. If you're curious, here is the cast list of who is playing the characters from this book:

Dwight - Clive Owen
Gail - Rosario Dawson
Miho - Devon Aoki
Shellie - Brittany Murphy
Becky - Alexis Bledel
Jack Rafferty - Benicio Del Toro
Manute - Michael Clarke Duncan
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A direct follow-up from what happened in "A Dame to Kill For," Dwight, with his new face, is now dating Shellie, one of the waitresses at Kadie's, the strip club, coming in between Shellie and her ex boyfriend Jackie Boy. When Jackie Boy and his gang roughs Shellie up at her apartment and heads into Old Town afterwards, Dwight trails Jackie Boy down, altering Gail and Miho of the approaching danger. Things get out of hand, and Miho slices everyone up. The big twist is when Dwight searches through Jackie Boy's wallet that he discovers he was a police officer, thus destroying the little "truce" the Old Town prostitutes have with the police force...unless Dwight can dispose of the body first, and then rescue Gail, who has been kidnapped by an angry, revenge-seeking Manute...

They often say three time's the charm, and that's the blunt truth with Frank Miller and his third installment in most likely the most artistically unique comic book series of all time, "The Big, Fat Kill." That spectacular style of exaggerated artwork and descriptive storytelling Miller is known for is still here, and it's never been better. Dwight McCarthy is back and Miller shows that he is still capable of what he can do, despite what Ava Lord did to him in "A Dame to Kill For." His relationship with Gail is also more focused on. Manute and, of course, Miho are back. Manute is even more sadistic and evil here, and Miho, as she did before, shows the killer born underneath her otherwise cute appearance. Speaking of which, I really like Miho. She just rocks. I've said before, I'll say it again: Miller is a genius. Strongly recommended, in addition to "The Hard Goodbye" and "A Dame to Kill For."
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on April 2, 2005
"The Big Fat Kill" is a fantastic tale, told in a classic "noir" style with the modern touch of Frank Miller.

My favorite character is a supporting one, Miho, a Crouching-Tiger-style martial arts expert. The main story is about Dwight and... well, I won't ruin the book by giving away the whole story. Just buy it, you won't be sorry.

"Dame to Kill For," and "That Yellow Bastard" are also excellent. "The Hard Goodbye" was a little gory for my taste, so if ultra-violence isn't your bag, you could skip that one (it's a "stand-alone" story anyway).

"The Big Fat Kill" is represented in the movie with the Clive Owen/Rosario Dawson parts, about the middle third of the film.

This is one great book!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on May 15, 2005
So far this is one of my favorite sin city books. The story starts off at Dwights girlfriend Shellie's house. Jackie Boy (who is Shellie's previous lover) is outside her door and wont leave her alone and insists he comes in. So he comes in drunk with some friends. Dwight is at her house and is waiting for Jack in the bathroom. Jack hits Shellie and Dwight roughs him up a little bit and scares them off. Jack and his friends drive off to old town with Dwight following them. The girls of old town then gruesomely kill jack and his friends. They then find out something about jack that makes them wish they never killed him. From then on it turns into a bloodbath of revenge and murder as Dwight and the girls do there best to keep all of sin city from crashing down on them. This is a very well written and illustrated story. But keep the young kids away.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon December 13, 2005
"The Big Fat Kill" explores the vices and virtues of Sin City, getting caught up in the murky codes of honor and vengeance in Old Town.

While Sin City may be a den of vipers, Old Town occupies that dark space where few vipers dare to go, and even fewer return. For Old Town is the bastion of the Sin City hookers, a murderer's row of Miller's femme fatale archetype. If you have the cash and can play by the rules, these ladies of the night will give you the time of your life. If you don't have the money and you can play by the rules, you can safely satisfy yourself with some visual delights.

But if you don't play by the rules, it doesn't matter if you've got money or not. You're gonna pay, and pay through the nose (and the fingernails, and the forehead, and the . . .).

This dark, dark tale of Old Town strongly features two of Miller's great characters. The first is Dwight, whom we met in "A Dame to Kill for." Dwight is an interesting guy, quiet-yet-seething, barely able to keep a lid on the ferocious beast that rages inside him. The next character of note is the infamous Miho, the gorgeous martial arts expert. While none of the characters in "Big Fat Kill" may rise to the loathesome heights of Marv, the notorious anti-hero of "The Hard Goodbye," they are still characters to savour.

Without giving any spoilers, "Big Fat Kill" revolves around an abusive boyfriend getting lost in Old Town and running afoul of both Dwight and the girls. As Dwight says, sometimes these kinds of problems can only be solved by killing a lot of people.

Look for lots of bullets, broads, and blood in this thrilling graphic novel, and you sure won't be disappointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on June 2, 2005
Dwight just wants to keep the peace. When his girlfriend Shellie gets attacked by a pack of horney drunks, Dwight finds himself playing Lancelot. He follows the drunk idiots to Old Town, where prositutes rule the city and the police stay out. The girls of Old Town make short work of the intruders, but it turns out that one of them was wearing a badge! It's up to Dwight to stand up for his friends and prevent the girls from getting demolished by the Mob and the police.

Although a bit short on plot (but full of action) the 3rd Sin City book is a great read. Dwight, the star of "A Dame to Kill For" returns in this book and so do his friends Miho and Gale. Even his enemy Manute makes a comeback.

I think Big Fat Kill is where Frank Miller really hit his stride in terms of artwork. The drawings in this book are positively gorgeous! Every frame is inked down to perfection, just check out that page drawing of Dwight dunking Jackie boy's head in the toilet! Beautiful stuff!!!

The narration in Big Fat Kill is pretty near perfect, and many of the series most quotable lines come from this chapter. Out of all the Dwight stories however, I think that this one is the weakest. I much prefer the Family Values story, Dwight is more in control and stronger than represented here. Or if you want to see Dwight's tragic downfall, A Dame to Kill for is a good place to start. I can' say why I think these are better, but simply a personal preference. You can't go wrong with this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon July 23, 2007
After the strong start of the Sin City series of THE HARD GOODBYE and A DAME TO KILL FOR, the books take a bit of a dip with this third volume, THE BIG FAT KILL. It is not bad, but it lacks that stick-to-the-ribs impact of the first two, mostly due to characters that are not as interesting as others we have seen.

Dwight McCarthy is simply not as intriguing a character as Marv from Volume 1 (nor as interesting as John Hartigan in the volume that follows this). This was not a major liability in the second volume, A DAME TO KILL FOR, for the simple reason that Dwight was overshadowed by one of the most captivating characters in the series, the ultimate femme fatale of Ava Lord. But here, Dwight has to stand more on his own and, although certainly not a bad character, he also certainly is not strong enough to really hold the audience as much as we would like.

Yes, there are the girls of Old Town. But their appeal is diluted as no one character stands out. Miho is quite something, but the fact that she does not talk limits her development. And personally, I always thought Gail was just not up to snuff for the Sin City series.

The book is saved by the action. Miho taking care of business the hard way, the Irish mercenaries, the high body count, make THE BIG FAT KILL worthwhile. The weaker characters are a detriment but, fortunately, not a deal breaker.
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