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Since You Went Away Hardcover – 1944


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Hardcover, 1944
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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: The Sundial Press; Reprint edition (1944)
  • ASIN: B000HMNUEE
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,552,276 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By R. Deniston on November 21, 2008
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I heard that David O. Selznik gave "Since You Went Away" a major overhaul, but I didn't know how much until I read this book. They are almost nothing alike. Wilder's book is much quieter. Anne works at a newspaper instead of at a shipyard, Jane's name is Jan, and Colonel Smollett is simply, "the colonel." And that's only the beginning. A lot of the characters that had major roles in the movie, such as Tony and Bill, seem barely on the periphery. Especially Bill--he only makes one appearance in the book, so of course the romance between he and Jane (Jan) doesn't happen. The dad's going missing doesn't happen either--he goes to England and drops out of touch for awhile, that's all. I found a couple of sentences at the beginning of the novel that were used in the movie, but that's it. Clearly, Wilder's book was meant to be escapist rather than inspirational. Fans of the movie will find it interesting, but they will enjoy it more if they read it as an example of WWII-era literature and not think about the film version too much.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 16, 2012
Since this was a 40s book I thought that I'd be bored with the narrative, so I was pleasantly surprised that the book was interesting and put me right in the time. I wanted to find out more - did Mr. Pudding return unscathed from the War? Did the girls realize their dreams? What happened to the Colonel after Tim returned? Did they have to turn him out? The antics of the dogs and Fidelia had me laughing out loud. And, who has not had a friend like Emily? I thought it was extremely upbeat for the situation Anne found herself in. Money worries and the safety of her husband had to have meant tears in the pillow while she was writing letters to bolster Tim's spirits.
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