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I Sing the Body Electric

Weather ReportAudio CD
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)

Price: $20.00
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Amazon Price New from Used from
MP3 Music, 7 Songs, 1990 $6.99  
Audio CD, Import, 1991 $9.32  
Audio CD, 1990 $20.00  
Vinyl --  
Audio Cassette, 1990 --  

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Unknown Soldiers (Album Version) 7:57$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  2. The Moors 4:40$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Crystal (Album Version) 7:16$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Second Sunday In August (Album Version) 4:09$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Vertical Invader / T. H. / Dr. Honoris Causa (live)10:39Album Only
listen  6. Surucucu (Album Version) 7:41$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Directions (Album Version) 4:34$0.99  Buy MP3 


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I Sing the Body Electric + Weather Report + Sweetnighter
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 20, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B00000273B
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #112,984 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
40 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love this album...you might not March 4, 2006
Format:Audio CD
Wayne Shorter and Joe Zawinul were arguably the two geniuses most responsible for Miles Davis's development from the mid-sixties into his electric period that revolutionized jazz in the seventies. Shorter constantly pushed the music forward with his adventurous compositions for Davis's "second great quintet" (some fantastic music there) and participated in "In a Silent Way" and "Bitches Brew" which launched fusion. Zawinul was the mastermind behind many compositions in the electric Miles period and helped define the different sounds that were to come from keyboardists in this style. Then the two left Miles to do things their own way, and thus they started Weather Report. Their first album, self-titled, was filled with fascinating quick sketches of new musical ideas capitalizing on the new palette of sounds that came from electronics. This album continued those experiments, but in a more developed and profound way. "Unknown Soldier" in particular is a masterpiece in angular, unconventional composition that manages to be beautiful and very challenging. "The Moors" features an appearance by guitarist Ralph Towner who plays an improvised introduction filled with ideas and lines nobody had ever thought of before, while managing to be extremely funky in some spots. I read that Towner was practicing some ideas for his intro, and Zawinul was concerned that he would be overly self-conscious when actually being recorded, so they recorded Towner practicing for the intro without his knowledge. It was good enough that they actually used his run-through, and when he finally said "okay, I'm ready," they told him he was already done.

The second half of the album is edited down from a performance in Tokyo, and the energy of the band in a live setting is astounding.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Weather Report Sings The Body Electric. December 26, 2003
Format:Audio CD
Weather Report's second album "I Sing The Body Electric" is quite different from anything else the band released in their entire career. Released in 1972, the album is probably the most experimental and varied of all the Weather Report releases. The style is not neccesarily Jazz nor is it Fusion. It would even be a stretch to categorize it as a Rock album. Above all, "I Sing The Body Electric" is can definitely be categorized as a Music album for the album indeed contains some great music.
The first half of the album contains four studio pieces. "Unknown Soldier" (composed by keyboardist Joe Zawinul) opens the album with a haunting choir of vocalists and an eerie sci-fi-like theme performed by sax player Wayne Shorter and guests Hubert Laws on flute, Andrew White on English horn and Wilmer Wise on trumpet. The overall arrangement is similar to that of Big Band music only the feeling is definitely close to psychedelic with the addition of alien-like sounds coming from Zawinul's newly acquired ARP synthesizer.
"The Moors" (composed by saxophonist Wayne Shorter) once again features the talents of guest musicians. This time, it's from guitarist Ralph Towner from the band Oregon. The sound of the guitar is rare in Weather Report's music since the band itself did not have a guitarist. After a slightly blues-based intro from Towner, the music shifts gears with a pounding tribal drumbeat with a sax melody that is definitely Middle Eastern-influenced. There is also some great drum and percussion work from band members Eric Gravatt and Dom Um Romao here.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Half studio, half live, 100% awesome April 3, 2001
By G B
Format:Audio CD
The first half of this 1972 album consists of studio recordings that continue the collective approach of the self-titled debut, but the arrangements are better developed and the amount of loose collective improvisation is more restricted. Zawinul's genius as an arranger becomes more apparent on his compositions; he uses three vocalists and three additional horns on the ominous "Unknown Soldier" to brilliant effect. "Second Sunday in August" uses a more pared back arrangement but a memorable melody and driving rhythm make this one of their best early tunes. Wayne Shorter, not to be outdone, contributes "The Moors" -- a great eerie piece featuring Ralph Towner on 12 string guitar. (And his fierce tenor sax blowing on "Unknown Soldier" is outstanding -- he would never sound this good in Weather Report again.) The rhythm section of Gravatt/Vitous/Romao is incredible. The second half of the album features an edited 20 minute excerpt from Live in Tokyo; though the music is fantastic, you should try to pick up the imported, unedited copy. This is one of the group's best albums, though it may not be the Heavy Weather fan's cup of tea.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars WR Album as Fusion-Jazz Futurism! June 13, 2003
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
Weather Reports' "I Sing the Body Electric" (whose title was borrowed from sci-fi writer Ray Bradbury) was a telling snapshot of the shape of what fusion-jazz was to beome in the very near future. Unlike the group's later successes -- "Black Market" and "Heavy Weather" -- ISBE lacks the compositional structure and instrumental stylings that would eventually define the group's signature sound. One cannot help but discern, from the album's very outset, that it is a ponderous effort, searching, trying to find something that the group had yet to nail down. But the basic elements are there, albeit unrealized: Zawinul's keyboarding, Shorter's sax riffs, etc. This album can be forgiven for its lack of direction because it is, after all, an improvizational effort which is the hallmark of jazz. It is the work of several talented alums from the "Miles Davis School of Jazz Experimentation" leaving the nest, trying their own wings. For this reason too the "live" tracks on the album make sense: the club-like setting that lends itself to instrumental risk-taking is, again, a cornerstone of the jazz genre. In later albums the group would begin to jell, both as composers and as band members. Eventually, WE would come to stand at the top of a rarified heap of other j-fusion artists, having finely honed its sound with each subsequent recording. In the world of pop, the "Beatles" cut their musical teeth in Hamburg before they finally defined what would become the "Mersey Sound." Weather Report's "proving ground" was the grooves of this originally vinyl effort. As another reviewer here said, do not expect this album to be an early version of "Birdland" or anything that would come later. Read more ›
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars I think Walt Whitman would have loved these guys.
The penultimate group to bring jazz fusion to the forefront. These guys are WAY too good, and Zawinul should be deified like Santana, Beck and Clapton. Buy this and all the rest!
Published 3 months ago by Carl Baker
4.0 out of 5 stars Studio Abstractions and Killer Live Music
I find the studio recordings on Side A here to be at least slightly more interesting than the band's debut album was. There's a bit more theme and direction this time around. Read more
Published 20 months ago by Scott McFarland
3.0 out of 5 stars 2.5
2.5 not because it's a bad album, it's not - it's a very good album. For one thing, live and studio combo does not work for me - it destroys the continuity. Read more
Published on April 26, 2012 by E. Minkovitch
5.0 out of 5 stars Whatever They're Singing,I Like What Their Playing
Life is filled with many kinds of music. There's music to dance to. There's music to sing to. There's music to scream to. There's music to think about. Read more
Published on March 20, 2012 by Andre S. Grindle
5.0 out of 5 stars singing electrical bodies of genius
I Sing the Body Electric might be the Weather Report's finest hour (though honestly, that's a tough call with classics like Sweetnighter and Mysterious Traveller being among the... Read more
Published on December 19, 2010 by B. E Jackson
4.0 out of 5 stars Adventurous Fusion Jazz
Weather Report is basically a super group who isn't very basic at all. This is a group, through the exploration of jazz and off the beaten path nuances, which is fully capable of... Read more
Published on July 16, 2009 by Corey Turner
5.0 out of 5 stars Unique masterpiece rivaling the best of Miles, John and Ornette
Miles Davis' electric albums In a Silent Way, Bitches Brew and A Tribute to Jack Johnson stand in themselves as one of the finest canons in the history of modern music. Read more
Published on July 1, 2009 by mianfei
5.0 out of 5 stars A Powerful Statement in Sound
Showing an amazing commercial viability - the album peaked at #147 on the Billboard pop album chart - the second release by the band is accessible avant-garde at a time when such... Read more
Published on March 1, 2009 by Best Of All
5.0 out of 5 stars A beginning and an end
This is a truly historic album. It is both the culmination of 40 years of jazz world blues music (Coltrane, Sun Ra, Miles, etc) and the beginning of a new musical freedom that... Read more
Published on February 10, 2008 by John F. Richards
5.0 out of 5 stars This my favorite Weather Report Album
The truth is that Weather Report changed a bit with every album. I've been listening to all of thier albums recently because my son has been getting into this group heavy. Read more
Published on November 30, 2007 by J. Polak
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