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Sings Heartache Numbers


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Audio CD, September 13, 2005
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 13, 2005)
  • Original Release Date: 2005
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Goofin'
  • ASIN: B000A2ESF6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #339,467 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. 1 Way Ticket To The Blues
2. Alone At A Table For 2
3. 3 Hearts Later
4. 4 Walls
5. 5 Fingers To Spare
6. Whiskey 6 Years Old
7. 7 Lonely Days
8. 8 Weeks In A Barroom
9. Apartment No.9
10. 10 Minutes Till Heartaches
11. A-11
12. The 12th Of Never
13. 13 Steps Away
14. Bonus Track 1

Editorial Reviews

Between the rockabilly of "Three Hearts Later" and the Patsy Cline-flavored "Four Walls," Marti Brom is a proud throwback to yesterday. She doesn't so much embrace the image of "old-style" country singer as flaunt it. The cover of Sings Heartache Numbers shows a big-eyed, bejeweled Brom, her hands and head resting on a whisky bottle that says "Marti." Brom is joined by a handful of fine musicians, including guitarist Levi Mullen and steel guitarist Dickie Overby, for a traditional country set. "Traditional" in this case means a hardcore country sound complete with whining steel and a waltz beat, and old songs like "Apartment #9" and "A-11." There's an enjoyable, melancholic take on "Eight Weeks in a Barroom," a song that traces the dissolution of one poor heartbroken soul. By the end of the song the poor sot has drunk herself into mental instability and lost her home (though it's possible the big car in the driveway is a hearse). Brom's vocal here is quite lovely. There's also a nice take on "The Twelfth of Never" before the album closes with an extra, unlisted -- but obvious -- track, "Heartache by the Numbers." Sings Heartache Numbers is an enjoyable, well-executed album, offering a nice alternative to Faith and Shania. ~ Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., Rovi

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By George Johnson on October 25, 2005
Marti Brom has delivered an excellent set of old-style rockabilly and country covers, with a consistency that allows listeners to simply insert their disc and press "play," not just because this release contains no clunkers but because it's fun to hear the progression of her theme. As the title "Heartbreak Numbers" succinctly suggests, all these songs of loneliness are associated with a number, and have been placed in sequential order. "One-Way Ticket," "Four Walls," and Hank Cochran's comical jukebox lament "A-11" are stand-outs.

While the music proves faithfully and gratifyingly retro, the recordings benefit technically from a clear sound and a fine mix, with no element sticking out intrusively, thanks to the engineering efforts of Justin Trevino.

Fans of Patsy Cline and contemporary artists Neko Case and Big Sandy should enjoy "Heartbreak." For that matter, if you like this, you'd probably like Marti's other offerings, including the more upbeat "Wise to You."
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By G. Nicholas on May 8, 2006
I was really impressed with this cd. Marti has a real rich and full voice. In alot of the songs she sounds like a cross between Wanda Jackson and Patsy Cline. I usually rate my cds on how many of the songs are dancable. There several good swing tunes plus a couple of waltzes. Another part of the CD that I enjoyed was the rich steel sounds as well as the fiddle. Since it was a numbers game, I would have picked a couple of different songs to fill the list but all in all a very good cd. I will probably look real close a purchasing more of hers.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Costa Rican Big-butt on April 14, 2006
Brom's vocals are delishious and tempting, and the songs are tasty too. This is the finest rockabilly release in ages. This is how hillbilly jazz should always be sung & played!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. Zakaluk on January 17, 2009
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Marti Brom is an Austin-based rockabilly honey who really knows her way around a tune. Here are songs strung together by the clever connection of numbers in their titles, a mix of sonic pleasures.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dixie Diamond on June 26, 2007
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Marti has a terrific voice for this kind of music (well, OK; she has a terrific voice, period). I was less impressed with the songs themselves. There are some really good tracks--the covers of "Heartaches By The Number" and "Seven Lonely Days" are very good--but a lot of them sound a bit like they were written just to fill in the number requirement ("Uh, oh--we need a song about Eight. Quick, somebody write a song about Eight!"), and the lyrics were pretty weak. Musically, though, this is great.
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