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Sink the Bismarck Mass Market Paperback – August, 1979


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Bantam Books (Mm) (August 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553133519
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553133516
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,681,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Kevin M Quigg VINE VOICE on January 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is a quick easy read for those wanting to know about the end of the German super battleship. The book is from the fifies, but the recent reprint gives a fictionalized concept of what happened when the German super battleship ventured out into the North Atlantic and met its fate. Since there were few survivors from the ship and almost none from the Hood, C. S. Forester recreates what could have been said. For young adults, this is a good read. I read this almost thirty years ago, and decided to read this again.
For one needing more information, this is not the book. It reads like a novel, but gives an overview of the struggle for the Atlantic in World War II. This is an easy read though.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John P. Jones III TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 9, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
C. S. Forester is most famous as the author of the "Hornblower" naval series, for example Hornblower : Beat to Quarters. The books glorified the exploits of the British navy, during the era of "Rule Britannia," and dashing Admiral Horatio Hornblower had few flaws. So, it is perhaps only naturally that he should be the author of a reasonably accurate historical recreation of one of the finest British victories at sea during the Second World War. "Their finest hour" was Churchill's apt expression for the exploits of the Royal Air Force in the summer and fall of 1940, when they broke the back of the Luftwaffe's air assault of Britain. Less than a year later, the Royal Navy had its finest hour at sea.

The Bismarck, along with its sister ship, The Tirpitz, (which was eventually sunk by the RAF in a fjord in Norway in 1944) were the largest "dreadnoughts" that Germany built for the war. The "dreadnought" was a British expression originating from before World War I, and designated large ships with large caliber guns, and which the Americans normally referred to as battleships. In May, 1941, the Bismarck broke out of its base in Norway, with the intention of disrupting supply convoys from the United States, which was not yet at war. It would have been easy for a ship the size of the Bismarck to have sunk an entire convoy, with its destroyer escorts, and thus it was absolutely essential for the British war effort that the Bismarck be found, and sunk.

It took nine days to accomplish this objective, but in the process the British battle cruiser, HMS Hood was sunk; there were only three survivors.
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Format: Paperback
The Last Nine Days of the Bismarck

C. S. Forester wrote many novels about a fictional character “Horatio Hornblower”, a sailor who lived in the late 18th century and took part in the Napoleonic Wars. This 1958 book is a fictionalized history about the sinking of that great German battleship in May 1941. It was the world’s largest and most dangerous warship, a threat to commercial shipping and the British Navy. Forester spent weeks with official records and interviewed many who were involved with the action. This book presents a dramatized version of what likely happened. Its 138 pages has maps, but no pictures or Index. The greatest battleship was sunk by torpedoes launched from biplanes (that came from an aircraft carrier), ending the long reign of battleships.

Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany and her allies after the fall of France in 1940. The ‘Bismarck’ was supplied with food and arms while in the port of Gdynia in preparation for her mission to attack British shipping and its Navy. The ‘Bismarck’ was faster than the fastest British liners and battleships, and more powerful than any one ship in the British Navy. Its departure was noticed and a message was sent to London. The British had to find and sink the ‘Bismarck’. The ‘Hood’ was blown-up, the ‘Prince of Wales’ hit and it retreated. The ‘Bismarck’ was hit in an oil tank and leaked a visible trail. Later nine ‘Swordfish’ torpedo planes appeared, one torpedo hit the starboard bow. Night and fog hid the ‘Bismarck’. The British sent every available ship to hunt the ‘Bismarck’. A Cataline sea plane sighted her and sent a message.

The crew of the ‘Bismarck’ were sleepy after continual action. The ‘Ark Royal’ launched her ‘Swordfish’ torpedo bombers. British ships were low on fuel.
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