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Comment: Hardcover in black boards. No dust jacket. 8vo. Third printing, two months after the first printing. Book is solidly bound and has crisp, clean pages. Map endpapers and frontispiece photos. Foreword by Chester W. Nimitz. 416 pp. including index.
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Sink 'Em All: Submarine Warfare in the Pacific Hardcover – 1951

4.6 out of 5 stars 107 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: E. P. Dutton & Co.; First Edition edition (1951)
  • ASIN: B000R556CU
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 6 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (107 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,005,039 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Sink `Em All is the war memoir (first published 1951) of Admiral Charles Lockwood (1890-1967), who commanded the U.S. submarine force in the Pacific for most of WW2. He started out commanding the Southwest Pacific subs in Fremantle, Australia, after the Asiatic Fleet retreated from the Philippines, and went on to the command of Pacific subs at Pearl Harbor, after Admiral Robert English was killed in a plane crash in February, 1943.

For Pacific War enthusiasts who have already read Clay Blair's comprehensive history of U.S. submarine operations against Japan entitled, "Silent Victory" (published 1975), there will be few surprises in this book. The main benefit you will get is hearing the story "from the horse's mouth." Having known personally, and commanded all the people about whom he writes gives Lockwood's story an intimacy and immediacy impossible to achieve even by the most diligent historian/researcher creating a second-hand history of the topic. It will also give you a feel for what most concerned Lockwood and his staff as the war progressed. In the beginning, the most heated issue Lockwood relates is the performance of torpedoes and their magnetic exploders. He is almost silent, however, on that other most pressing issue early in the war that plagued the submarine service: the "skipper problem." The skipper problem concerned the peacetime skippers who turned out to be inadequate wartime skippers, or any skippers, for that matter, who lacked the combination of equanimity and aggressiveness that was essential to the success of a war patrol.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This book is V.Adm. Lockwood's narrative of his years in WW2. He was the Commander of the submarine group in Western Australia at the beginning of the Pacific War & then, later, the commander of all of the submarines in the Pacific. He gives the classic, cheery, narrative that you'd expect from an Admiral whose crews sank virtually the complete Japanese Merchant Fleet & a significant number of IJN warships during the war.

An added note is that this book gives a great view of the war from the perspective of an active fleet commander. Many other great books are out there, but they mostly focus on the activities of a specific submarine, or submarine commander. It's amazing to read about the activities that were performed in the background and behind the scenes to keep those boats out there hunting and sinking Japanese ships.

He goes over the difficulties: old S-boats; bad exploders in torpedoes; wear & tear on both ships and men with a light but extremely serious demeanor. And, he writes about each of the boats & their commanders with both praise for their victories & sorrow for their loss.

PS. It is a good idea to have a browser window open on your computer as you read this book because you will be compelled to go deeper into the history of both the men and the ships that he mentions in this book.

Disclaimer: This is a review of the third printing of the Hardcover Edition of the book as borrowed from the University of Minnesota Library through the Inter-Library Loan System.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The author Vice Admiral Charles A. Lockwood commanded the U.S. submarine force in the Pacific. This book examines how the strategy was formed ad implemented. He does this through his own diaries and by reports made by submarines. This book is an important document for anyone interested in how the submarine force won thier part of the Pacfic campaign.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a compelling “first person” narrative of the submarine war during World War II in the Pacific. Admiral Lockwood was the admiral in charge, and he must have been an amazing person, as he defined and defended the submarine strategy, implemented the tactics, worked closely with the surface fleet admirals, enjoyed the complete confidence of his CINC, Admiral Nimitz (aka “The Big Boss”) and he even enjoyed a cordial working relationship with the majestic and imperial minded General MacArthur. Lockwood also drove the submarine warfare technology, most notably in improving the quality and the “kill rate” of US torpedoes, which were notoriously unreliable at the start of the war.

The book was written in 1953 and focuses on Lockwood’s WWII experiences. There are no “boyhood home stories”. Lockwood is understandably coy about the new “secret weapons” such as mine detection sonar, electric torpedoes, and the introduction of electronics. He mentions the “secret weapon” the Torpedo Data Computer (TDC) only in passing, and he does not mention the electronic homing torpedo, and just refers to it as a “secret weapon”. Lockwood was a true believer in taking care of his men, by ensuring the best food, equipment and supplies, but also by building “rest camps” where crews on leave could rest and relax in beachside camps.

Lockwood was determined to shorten the war by sinking as many Japanese ships as possible. He was particularly proud of his strategy of focusing on Japanese tankers, as he understood that without oil the Japanese Navy could not function.

Lockwood has a pleasant writing style, and he provides a wonderful narrative from the insider at the top perspective. His predictions of nuclear powered and missile armed submarines were very accurate, as was his prediction of the growth of the Soviet Navy and its underwater fleet.

This is a “must read” for anyone with an interest in the Pacific War.
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