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Sins of the Flesh: A Carmine Delmonico Novel Hardcover – November 12, 2013


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Sins of the Flesh: A Carmine Delmonico Novel + The Prodigal Son: A Carmine Delmonico Novel (Carmine Delmonico Novels) + Naked Cruelty: A Carmine Delmonico Novel (Carmine Delmonico Novels)
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Product Details

  • Series: Carmine Delmonico
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (November 12, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1476735336
  • ISBN-13: 978-1476735337
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #979,527 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

August 1969. A serial killer is operating in and around Holloman, a Connecticut college town, killing people in an especially slow and gruesome manner. Carmine Delmonico, the homicide cop who’s featured in a handful of excellent crime thrillers (beginning with 2006’s On, Off), is stymied. Suspects begin to emerge, but just as Carmine thinks he might be getting somewhere, something happens that takes him right back to square one. Of its many virtues (strong characters, realistic dialogue, smartly constructed stories), the Delmonico series’ foremost selling point is its time and place: a small Connecticut town in the 1960s, well before modern-day, high-tech forensic investigative techniques existed. The book offers readers the chance to observe a murder investigation done the old-school way, without all the modern technological bells and whistles. Reading the book from our modern-day perspective, we think that if only Carmine could do this, or if only he had access to that, and that juxtaposition of contemporary crime-solving methods against the techniques of an earlier era proves to be a brilliant way of involving the reader in the story. A fine mystery. --David Pitt

Review

"Will be welcomed by readers who just love that creepy feeling....there's plenty of criminal insanity to go around." (Publishers Weekly)

"Mind-boggling, murderous plots." (Kirkus Reviews)

More About the Author

Colleen McCullough was born in Australia. A neuropathologist, she established the department of neurophysiology at the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney before working as a researcher and teacher at Yale Medical School for ten years. Her writing career began with the publication of Tim, followed by The Thorn Birds, a record-breaking international bestseller. She lives on Norfolk Island in the South Pacific with her husband, Ric Robinson.

Customer Reviews

It is a good mystery, very descriptive but without over the top bloodletting.
the GreatReads!
Had the writing style (and particularly the dialog) been less irritating, this would have been a better book.
TChris
Her Carmine Delmonico detective series rates in my top ten best of any of that genre I've read.
The English Touch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By L. .G. avid reader on April 28, 2014
Format: Hardcover
This is the first book I have read in the series and had no problems following the characters... so this makes it a good stand alone book. The story takes place in 1969 - so there are no cell phones, computers or dna
Delia is an unusually dressed police officer who meets a couple of ladies on the beach trying to rescue a kitten - and the 3 become good friends. One of the ladies is Jess, a neuruscietist who works at a Hospital and penitentiary for the criminally insane where she operated on the brain of Walter a serial killer - to make him more docile. The other lady, Ivy, works for her step-brother Rha who has a wedding dress store - well known and worth millions
Delia is currently working a case where 6 women have disappeared. Her partner Abe is working a case where several men have been found starved and with their testicles removed
The stories and the people all come together in a very entertaining story
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sheila Omecene on March 11, 2014
Format: Hardcover
This book was most unrealistic. First, it is set in a small town in which not one, but two possible serial killers exist. So much of the "intrigue" happens right under everyone's nose. The solution to the first set of murders was abrupt and wrapped up too neatly with very little reason for the murderers actions. The characters were stereotypical, offensively so, the exceedingly fey gay men and the jivin' hooker and her pimp. I forced myself to finish this book, hoping it would redeem itself, but it did not.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By The English Touch on April 7, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
McCullough has written anything I haven't liked and respected for it's characters and story. Her Carmine Delmonico detective series rates in my top ten best of any of that genre I've read. Her writing has never devolved into a rehash of the same ole' thing and she never insults my intelligence. You will be engrossed in this one just as you will in any of her books whether set in a teeming American city or Ceasar"s brutally raw Rome (her Roman historical fiction series). Not the very best of her books, but her second best will grab you and put you in a story you never want to put it down. She's one of those who's new books I'd never miss, particularly a Carmine Delmonico one.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By TChris TOP 100 REVIEWER on November 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover
A serial killer starves his victims before removing their testicles. Police Lieutenant Abe Goldberg's search for the killer takes him to the world of small town theater (which, in the Holloman, Connecticut of 1969, is surprisingly elaborate). Meanwhile, Sergeant Delia Carstairs is occupied with the Shadow Women, six missing women -- one disappearance each year for six years -- who rented apartments around the first of the year, lived isolated lives, then disappeared in late June, leaving behind a few articles of cheap clothing and a studio portrait. That investigation segues into the department's oldest open missing persons investigation (involving a female doctor who disappeared in 1925), which the star of the series, Carmine Delmonico, undertakes to solve.

Delia's new friends, Ivy Ramsbottom and Jessica Wainfleet, are given starring roles. Jessica is the director of an institute for the criminally insane who is famed for curing the raging psychopath Walter Jenkins. As an author should, Colleen McCullough devotes considerable time to character development. While Delia tends to be stuffy, judgmental, pretentious and dull, Carmine and Jessica are just pretentious and Abe is just dull. Fortunately, some of the supporting characters are more colorful. Nearly all of the characters, however, are so eloquent in their conversations (even when talking to themselves) as to detract from the novel's credibility. The characters are not necessarily inauthentic, but the dialog is. They speak with the same voice ... an annoying voice that often borders on the ridiculous. They are so determinedly chipper and witty and chummy and erudite that I wanted to strangle them every time they spoke -- and they are a loquacious bunch.
Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Geraldine J. Layne on April 1, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very engrossing plot. Less character development for some of the characters than others, but the new ones more than make up for it! Carmine and his crew are, as always, believable as people as well as cops. McCullough is superlative at getting into the minds of her villains
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Roscoe on February 9, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I love Colleen McCullough, however I have honestly been struggling with the last couple of books in the Carmine Delmonico series. Given the authors background in neuroscience it is no surprise really that her books come across as being written by someone highly educated, particularly this story. The interaction and dialogue between characters can sometimes be very clunky & not at all what I would consider realistic. In some places it is highly appropriate - for example Dr Jess Wainfleet talking to colleagues, in others it is not. I could not pretend to understand some of the things bought up in the book(and I have a biomedical background) so I fail to see how other characters would instantly grasp what is going on when they have, in some cases no education related to the subject matter.
The mystery component of this book was excellent with a couple of twists that the reader won't see coming. If you can look past some of the clunky dialogue, then this is still another good addition to the Carmine Delmonico series and worth the read.
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