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The Siren Song (Cronus Chronicles, Book Two) Hardcover – June 5, 2007


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Frequently Bought Together

The Siren Song (Cronus Chronicles, Book Two) + The Immortal Fire (The Cronus Chronicles) + The Shadow Thieves (The Cronus Chronicles)
Price for all three: $43.73

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 970L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers (June 5, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416905898
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416905899
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 5.8 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,451,991 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Witty, well-paced, and fun." -- Kirkus

"Readers will root for [Charlotte] as she battles powerful Greek Gods and monsters." -- School Library Journal

"Charlotte and Zee make a great team - look forward to seeing more of them as the Cronus Chronicles continue." -- Horn Book

About the Author

Anne Ursu is the author of The Shadow Thieves, The Siren Song, and The Immortal Fire, all books in the Cronus Chronicles series. She has also written novels for adults. Anne teaches at Hamline University's Masters of Fine Arts in Writing for Children for Young Adults. She lives in Minneapolis with her son and cats.

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Customer Reviews

Ms. Ursu's writing is sharp and funny.
Angela Robinson
Ursu gives us his point of view about being defeated and wanting revenge.
Kate Coombs
It was a suspenseful book from the beginning.
Emily Cocea

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Pat Shand VINE VOICE on August 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
As the first book in Annie Ursu's "Cronus Chronicles" series "The Shadow Thieves" was one of my favorites of 2006, I highly anticipate buying my copy of the sequel, "The Siren Song" when it came out this summer. Though it wasn't quite as good as its predecessor, the writing still has that same quality. It reads like J. K. Rowling-lite with a bit of Lemony Snicket sprinkled throughout for flavor, with dialogue that snaps and zaps across the pages like a blast from Poseidon's trident.

While it lacks the sentimentality of the last book in some aspects (particularly the story arc of Zee's grandmother from "The Shadow Thieves") the sense of humor is certainly taken up a notch. Resident hero Charlotte Mealswetski deals with the repercussions of her actions in the first book, both from her parents (who've grounded her) and a few angry Greeks gods (who want nothing less than her untimely death). Without revealing the plot, I can say this: Unlike the first book in the series, this is much more of a solo adventure for Charlotte. Zee is... let's say incapacitated for the majority of the novel, which is good and bad. On the good side, we get to know Charlotte a lot better, as her character develops radically, but yet till subtly, throughout these four hundred and thirty pages. A negative about not having Zee around as much is that we don't get as much dialogue between the two of them as we did last time, which was always a treat. However, I daresay it was worth it to see Charlotte venturing bravely by herself into a new aquatic world to take on Poseidon and Philinecron (once again). The world Ursu shows us in this book is as quirky as the underworld from "The Shadow Thieves", but also as different from it as can possibly be.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bananas on June 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Everyone that I know who read Shadow Thieves absolutely loved it. Well, they'll love the second book in the series, too. I don't want to spoil any surprises, but rest assured that Charlotte and Zee are not satisfied with the way things ended at the end of book one...neither are their enemies.
I sure love these characters, I love Anne Ursu's humor, and I absolutely can't wait to see what happens next.
I highly recommend this book for male and female readers 8-14.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kate Coombs VINE VOICE on September 2, 2007
Format: Hardcover
A lot of writers TRY to be funny, but Anne Ursu actually pulls it off. You know you're in for a good time when the four parts of a fantasy book are titled "Fish," "Fishy," "Fishier," and "Fishiest." Ursu has a field day with the fact that a girl who disappeared one night (in the last book) to save the world did not get praised when she came home; instead she was grounded for life and sent to a therapist:

"After they call the police to tell them you have returned home safely, and then they hug you a lot and cry for a while, well--after that, they want to know where you've been. (And, for that matter, why you are covered in weird-looking slime, purple cobwebs, and Harpy poo, and why your cat's leg is broken.) And when you don't tell them, they tend to get pretty upset. And after a few days, when you still haven't told them, they stick you in therapy. They're going to give you speeches about how DISAPPOINTED they are in you and how family is all about TRUST and how you worried them to DEATH and you don't have the decency to explain where you WERE and they have to assume the worst--which is that you can't be trusted. And then they ground you. A lot. Charlotte Mielswetzski had once thought that she could talk her way out of any situation. This was before she came back from the Underworld."

That's just a small sampling of the tongue-in-cheek style, which supports the microscope Ursu turns on human nature even as she moves her adventure story along. Ursu is especially good at showing the basic disconnect between kids and grown-ups: adults say they want to hear what kids are thinking, but when the kids venture to share their true thoughts, they are met with disapproval or even punishment.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dean B. Thomson on July 31, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Well, we're all going to read the final Harry Potter book aren't we? But I just discovered another constellation in the firmament just as brilliant: Anne Ursu's second installment in her Chronos Chronicles trilogy, The Siren Song. My children, 17 and 13, and I were delighted by this book. The Greek gods with their laughably vain and all too human foibles again threaten to wreak havoc on the lives of the two teen protagonists. Fortunately, Zee and Charlotte again outwit the immortals but not before we're treated to captivating encounters with Poseidon and his aquatic circle of sycophants, clueless (but very recongnizable) parents, and the deliciously evil Philonecron. What separates this effort from the sea of other teen books is its inventiveness, wit, and comfortable intelligence. It's suffused with such easy charm that you're captured and carried along until the sea voyage ends all too soon. No better time can be spent than in the company of this author. Bon Voyage.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pop Bop TOP 500 REVIEWER on June 18, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a very big fan of the first book in this trilogy, ("The Shadow Thieves"). After a slow start it really moved into high gear and gave us two heroes who had a great dynamic, a strong plot, fascinating secondary characters and villains, and a very satisfying sense of humor and general good humor throughout the whole project.

This sequel falls below that standard in almost all respects. Almost nothing happens through the first quarter of the book. Zee pretty much doesn't exist as a character at all. The first half of the book is mostly griping by Charlotte about her parents and about how permanently grounded she has been because of her unexplained absences during the action from the first book. In fact, pretty much everything Charlotte does is complain and mope.

When the book does get going it consists mostly of cartoonish behavior by the few gods who make appearances. The first book had a lot of fun mythology and some very sly plotting. This one isn't even mythology-lite and once you learn Poseidon the Sea God is the number two Olympian after Zeus you've pretty much learned everything you're going to learn. There really is no actual plot until some action in the last fifty pages of the book.

There are some funny set scenes and some snappy dialogue, but just not enough to carry a whole book. I'd suggest reading "The Shadow Thieves", because it really is remarkably good. But this followup is for diehard fans only, and even they will probably be disappointed.
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