Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.95
  • Save: $5.97 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Sister Ignatia: Angel of ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Go_Deals
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: No sign of writing, notes, or highlights in text. May have some shelf wear on corners
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sister Ignatia: Angel of Alcoholics Anonymous Paperback – August 31, 2001


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.98
$9.64 $7.99


Frequently Bought Together

Sister Ignatia: Angel of Alcoholics Anonymous + The Soul of Sponsorship: The Friendship of Fr. Ed Dowling, S.J. and Bill Wilson in Letters + Ebby: The Man Who Sponsored Bill W.
Price for all three: $32.35

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 394 pages
  • Publisher: Hazelden; Second Edition edition (August 31, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1568387466
  • ISBN-13: 978-1568387468
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #619,259 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Mary Darrah is a former addictions counselor and treatment program administrator who now specializes in national public policy issues related to alcohol or drugs.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By madhatter on June 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
Mary Darrah deserves credit for tackling the biography of a tremendously overlooked personality from AA's past. The story of the little Nun is covered in detail. Darrah does a good job of getting the facts down.

However, this book suffers from stilted language and poor organization. The narrative conveys no passion or excitment, something I'm sure the writer must have possesed in order to cover such an obscure figure as Sister Ignatia. The chapters are not organizaed well and do not flow evenly into each other.

IT almost has the feel of one of those bad textbooks you had in high school.

However, it's still worth laying out the money for this book if you're desiring a better understanding of AA history.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Grey on May 13, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a great history of the beginnings of A.A. and of the struggles of Dr. Bob to find a credible medical facility to help in the physical and spiritual recovery of alcoholics. Sr. Ignatia is one more non-alcoholic, like Dr. Silkworth and Fr. Ed Dowling, who serve at a pivotal point in the A.A. story. The author helps us see in Sr. Ignatia's own spiritual and personal biography how uniquely prepared and how providentially generous she was to be able to facilitate Dr. Bob's and A.A.'s program at St. Thomas Hospital in Akron, Ohio. I was intrigued with the seriousness that Sr. Ignatia, the doctors at St. Thomas and the Sisters of Charity in recognizing and attending to the underlying spiritual dimension of alcoholism. They were not the only ones to do this, as the book relates, but they helped bridge the moral/clinical gap that so many professionals and others, then as today, refuse(d) to accept.

I found Sr. Ignatia's life journey very instructive. She was a very diligent teacher of music, professional, and in a sense driven. She had her Waterloo experience in a near nervous breakdown. The doctor asked her if she wanted to be a dead music teacher or a live nun? Thence, began her service as Admissions Director at St. Thomas. She had learned first hand that living life involved ups and downs and that a "mysterious-to-us-at-times" Providence, Power Greater Than Ourselves, God would lead when we were ready to surrender. Living in that awareness allows one to take risks for the good. The story of Sr. Ignatia, Dr. Bob and early A.A. in Akron and Cleveland is a story of risk and fulfillment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 22, 1998
Format: Paperback
In the early days of Alcoholics Anonymous, the recovery rate was about seventy five per cent. Today, the recovery rate is less than one per cent. In the early days of AA, 1935 to 1945, the founders of AA (Bill Wilson, Dr. Bob Smith and Sister Ignatia) operated under the concept that alcoholism was the indication of a spiritual illness. You first took away the alcohol, let the patient go through the withdrawal, and then they trained the alcoholic to be a spiritual person, both by learning to pray, (any religion would do) and then to pass your victory on to other suffering alcoholics. As AA grew, it began to be accepted in government run hospitals. And anything to do with the government has to have nothing to do with religion. So they began to treat alcoholics with psychiatry and downplayed the religious angle, hence the much lower recovery rate. Groups that use religion to treat alcoholics, like Teen Challenge, have an 80% recovery rate. When Sister Ignatia was helping to steer the recovery boat, along with Bill Wilson, Dr. Bob and the assent to Grace, recovery from alcoholism was possible for the first time on this planet. The other influence working against AA's religious methods was the birth, in the late 50's, of political correctness which fears surrender to religion (of ALL kinds) Reading this book about Sr. Ignatia has strenghthened my spirituality in AA. I just celebrated fourteen years sober.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
Mary Darrah's book on Sr. Ignatia is an excellent historical document for all to read whether or not they are in recovery from alcohol or other drugs. This book is an accurate historical account of both the early days of Alcoholics Anonymous as well as the life of a compassionate yet tough woman.
This book is a must read for anyone interested in the truth about AA history. It is interesting, informative and enlightening.
Mitchell K. (Author of HOW IT WORKED, The Story of Clarence H. Snyder and the Early Days of Alcoholics Anonymous in Cleveland, Ohio)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mary Wether on February 4, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have read a number of articles on the history of AA over the years, since I work with some recovering alcoholics. Sister Ignatia who?? I had no idea that without her help and support, which included violating and circumventing hospital regulations for years, there would never have been a place for AA to get started. She was the admissions clerk for the hospital; and at that time, hospitals wanted nothing to do with treating drunks. And that was the least of what she did, and of the guidance and support she offered. Sister Ignatia was not even a nurse, she was an artist who had been reassigned to hospital duties.

You would think that at least AA feminists would have celebrated her memory, but she has gone down the memory hole. I'm glad this book was written to remember all she gave. It's well written, too, in a vivid and clear way. My copy was grabbed by a recovering woman in AA. definitely worth reading if you are interested in great women or in AA history and origins.

Also, to my shock, AA used to be vastly more effective that it is today. The book explains why.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews