Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This copy shows very minor wear. Free State Books. Never settle for less.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sister to the Wolf Hardcover – August 1, 2004


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$121.38 $0.01

Summertime is Book Time
Discover our hand-selected picks of the best books for kids of all ages. Browse by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12.

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-8–This engaging piece of historical fiction begins in Québec in 1703. Witnessing the branding of a Pawnee "indien" slave, Cécile Chesne buys the young man to save him from further abuse and to ensure his freedom. Deeply indebted, Lesharo accompanies the teen and her father, a coureur de bois, on their journey to Détroit. On the road, the travelers are on equal footing and forge a friendship based on mutual respect. However, when they arrive at the fort, it is clear that its residents expect Lesharo to assume a subservient role. A violent confrontation forces Cécile and her father to make a painful decision. In addition to providing a rich historical background and vividly re-creating the sense of wilderness, Trottier has drawn her characters and their relationships in a fully satisfying manner. There is plenty of action and a sweet romance in the mix as well.–Elizabeth Fernandez, Brunswick Middle School, Greenwich, CT
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Gr. 6-9. Cecile, who lives in Quebec in the early 1700s, sees a Lesharo, "an indien slave," being branded by his master. She buys Lesharo and frees him, and their paths become further intertwined when he accompanies Cecile and her father to Fort Detroit. They explore each other's cultures while growing to trust one other. Cecile, an independent young woman with a surprisingly forward-thinking father, makes a sympathetic heroine. Several historical people and events are woven into the story, but more memorable are the fictional characters at the forefront, their trials, and their relationships. Trottier, a Canadian writer whose ancestral tree includes branches at Fort Detroit, tells a memorable story without the sentimentality that often results when romance meets historical fiction. Carolyn Phelan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Kids Can Press (August 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 155337519X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1553375197
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,428,225 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 7, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Maxine Trottier demonstrates her talents yet again in this wonderful book! Cecile is a French-Canadian girl, trying to find her way through life, with the help of Lesharo and Papa, of course. Through trial and happiness, this is an awsome story and there NEEDS to be a sequel!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ruth Jean Shaw on December 7, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is a French-Canadian story of a fifteen-year-old girl and the journey of self-discovery as she travels through the wilderness in the early 1700s. Her grandmother expects her to behave like a proper French lady. Story conveys conflict between white invaders and native Indians. Interesting historical fiction.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Maggie T on May 12, 2014
Format: Paperback
The story is quite compelling and the characters are realistic and likable, and it's a good look at a very interesting time in history. However, if the author had glossed any harder over negative aspects of various native cultures, the book would reflect like a mirror. A great deal of time is spent dwelling on the evils of 'white' society-- bigotry, shallowness, slavery, dishonesty, etc, while native american culture is portrayed as being more inclusive and genuine. Less-than-savory aspects of native cultures, like extreme misogyny, slavery (both sides did it), endless bloody wars and raids, and freaking HUMAN SACRIFICE are not entirely ignored, but are barely given a one-sentence, highly sanitized mention. I have no problem confronting the evils done by colonists to natives and to each other, but please let go of the whole 'noble savage' myth. It's not doing anyone any good.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again