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Sisterhood of Dune
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Showing 1-10 of 59 reviews(4 star)show all reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on January 12, 2014
If you like the Dune books this is worth the read. I read a few reviews that stated there were inconsistencies with the original Book but it has been so long since I read any other Dune books I did not notice. This book gives you the background of the Bene-Gesserit sisterhood. I like prequels, they explain things so I will read Mentats of Dune when it comes out.
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on June 29, 2015
Sisterhood of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson lives up to the expectations set by reading nine of the other novels they've contributed to Frank Herbert's Dune legacy.
Plenty of people are happy to dismiss these supplemental prequels, sequels, and gap-filler novels...but I'm not one of them. I won't deny it's an easy perspective to adopt, considering that neither Brian nor Kevin have the literary prowess Frank Herbert displayed...and the vision isn't quite there either, but expecting them to somehow match Herbert's writing would be absurd anyhow. There are plenty of people out there, like me, who feel the aching need to keep diving further into the universe that Dune created, otherwise there wouldn't have been bestsellers in what they've released...so I have plenty of company in still loving these books even with the faults and shortcomings.
This novel goes a step further than the trilogy that preceded it in delving into the development of the powerful organizations that later come to majorly influence the universe in which Dune takes place. In addition to providing intimate glimpses into the early stages of the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood, a good deal of the story focuses on the Suk medical practitioners, the Mentat schooling, the transportation company that later becomes the Spacing Guild, as well as a little bit more detail of the Swordmaster training program.
The overall theme of the narrative is dedicated to a conflict between unreasoning superstition and rational thought...which seems a bit on the nose as far as the political climate in America is concerned, but it wasn't handled so poorly as to be irritating.
I'm terribly biased where all things Dune are concerned...so I enjoyed the book. My judgment is questionable though, but that's probably always true.
It ends with an open-ended quality that makes it clearly pave the way for Mentats of Dune, which I haven't picked up yet, but plan to...and I must admit it would be nice to see how the Butlerian anti-technology fanatics get reigned in sufficiently that the technologically advanced planets of IX and Richese are able to flourish and become what they are by the time Dune and the immediately preceding trilogy come along. So, here's for hoping that these two authors follow up and add yet another volume to the expanding literary universe of Dune. I know that I'll read it.
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The Battle of Corrin is long over, and the Imperium is still in recovery mode. It's been 83 years since the last thinking machine was destroyed, and the Emperor is now Salvatore Corrino. The descents of Harkonnen are still seeking vengeance against the Atreides, as they live exiled and in disgrace. The schools of the Imperium are trying to make headway: the Mentats school, the Sisterhood and the Suks. With Manford Torondo leading the charge of the Butlerians and trying to find (and destroy) any last remains of technology, its a very fragile Imperium. A Imperium trying to recover and forge a new way for the future.

I want to start this review with a little disclaimer. I'm a fan of the original six Dune novels, but I was introduced to Dune, as an adult, with House Atreides. I devoured that trilogy and moved onto the original six novels and have loved the Duneverse ever since. That was 14 years ago and every year I either re-read several Dune novels or catch up on the latest release. I'm thankful for Kevin J Anderson and Brian Herbert carrying on this legacy. The additional novels will never be like the originals, but I appreciate them for what they are - a delightful continuation of the Dune saga.

I'm part of #TeamAtredies and #TeamSisterhood. Ever since House Atreides I've been fascinated by the history behind both of these parts of Imperium. In the trilogy set around the thinking machines we learn about how the feud between the Atreides and the Harkonnens began, and it is still in full force in Sisterhood of Dune. Griffen Harkonnen goes to find Vorian Atreides and to avenge his family. Meanwhile his sister, Valya, attends the Sisterhood to become a sister and discovers a very ailing school.

In Sisterhood of Dune I quickly got swept up in the action across the Imperium. I was fascinated by how many industries, that we take for granted in the later books, made their start in the recovering Imperium. Norma Cenva, who developed the fold space technology, is still alive and the Venport Holdings is trying to take over all of the space travel.

I listened to Sisterhood of Dune on audio and I enjoyed Scott Brick's interpretation of all the characters. While there is more of a full cast on the originals, Scott Brick does a great job of capturing the atmosphere of the troubling Imperium and it was a enjoyable listen.

Sisterhood of Dune was a re-read for me (first time listening on audio) and it was the perfect way to catch up before I start Mentats of Dune (which was released today). If you are new to the Duneverse, I recommend starting with the classic Dune.
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on June 26, 2015
I'm a Dune geek and will probably buy anything associated with it. These prequel books are always good in that they try to fill in the blanks hinted at in the canon Dune series. This book did not capture my imagination as well as I thought it would. While continuing to put into place the origins of many of the important elements in the canon books, I just found myself checking story points off. I was more interested in my own musing about what some of the plot points did for my thinking than what the story did. I also have to admit a petty annoyance at the cover art. That image is only valid at the conclusion of the book not the whole story at all.
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on August 5, 2015
Sisterhood of Dune tells the stories of Raquella starting up what will become the Bene Gesserit. The Machine War has been over for seventy years. Reverend Mother Superior Raquella has set up on the planet Rossak. She and other women are secretly using banned computers for their breeding programs, which will lead to their destruction if they are not very discrete and careful. But the unexpected happens and the weak Corrino emperor finds out, which changes the Sisterhood forever. Meanwhile, Josef Venport has become the most powerful and richest businessman in the universe. Manford Torondo and his Butlerian faithful, who are bitterly anti-technology, are steadily expanding their bloody and violent anti-computer crusade across the universe. Gilbertus Albans, the headmaster of the Mentat School, has his feet in both the progressive, pro-technology camp and the Butlerian's anti-technology camp. He also has Erasmus's gel circuit brain hidden in his office in the Mentat School. Sisterhood of Dune is the prelude to Mentat's of Dune. The two books should be considered halves of one epic story. I recommend you read Sisterhood of Dune before Mentat's of Dune. They will make more sense if you do.
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on March 9, 2013
I’m so glad I’m not a Dune purist. I just glanced over several reviews of Sisterhood and found that most people were in one of two camps. There are those who loved the original series and resent the backstories presented by Frank Herbert’s son and Mr. Anderson. Then, there are those like me, who loved the Dune series and want more.

When I picked up Sisterhood of Dune, I was hoping for an escape from the dark historical books I had been reading. I wanted entertainment and excitement, and that is exactly what Herbert and Anderson delivered.

One of my favorite story lines from the original Dune series was narratives about the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood. I was excited to see more info in this book regarding the continuation of the sorceresses into the sisterhood, their fascination with bloodlines and breeding, and the evolution of Reverend Mothers. Make no mistake, the book isn’t entirely about the Sisterhood (which did disappoint some reviewers), but this book has several other terrific plots and story lines, so I didn’t mind.

We also see the return of Erasmus, the evil robot – although he’s pretty much just limited to his memory core. It doesn’t bode well for the future of humanity. Also a danger to humanity are the negative forces at work: the Butlerians – who once freed humanity from the computers who would enslave them, now a right-wing faction bent on destroying all machines and the people who would promote them. Another positive turned negative: VenHold – home of the space Navigators, has turned into a ruthless organization, determined to establish power and superiority through monopoly.

Fast-paced and exciting, the authors deftly establish new Dune stories within the parameters of the old. Wonderful stuff!
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on February 25, 2014
....those that have read the other Dune books. It deals with the early history of the Imperium, Sisterhood, the Spacing Guild, the Suk school and the school for Mentats. The Butlerian movement and the early days of the feud between the Atreides and the Harkonnens are also explored.
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on April 12, 2014
Another pretty good story in the prequels to Dune. You learn more about the Sisters of Wallach 9 and a few other players in the series. The usual good writing, character development, storyline, etc. Obviously, Brian got his father's genes when it comes to writing.
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Ok not bad. The same as all the others. How much more dune can we take. These books all these books, by BHKJA are for dune fanatics only. Frank Herbert was a real genius. These are not on his level. But the books are ok. I'm happy to have them.
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on April 15, 2014
Another well written Dune sci-fi book. And I loved it. It could have used a better ending, though. Many of the different plot lines were left without resolution or any idea of what might happen next. Maybe in the next volume?
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